Hamilton County

T/Sgt. Arthur Philbrook

 

 

1922-2014

 

TWO MORE ING MEN MISSING

T. Sgt. Philbrook, Pvt. Myrl Ray Reported Lost Oct. 18.

Relatives of two more Iowa National Guardsmen from Webster City received notices over the weekend that the soldiers were missing in action in Italy, it was disclosed Monday, bringing to three the number of 34th infantry members lost in action on Oct. 18.

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Philbrook, living southeast of this city, have received a war department telegram that their son, Tech Sgt. Arthur C. Philbrook ha been missing in action since Oct. 18.

Was Section Leader

Sergeant Philbrook served as a section leader with the ING company and had participated in some of the bitterest fighting in the Italian campaign during which the 34th infantry or “Red Bull” division, made a name for itself as one of the outstanding units of the American Fifth army. He was last heard from in a letter written Oct. 10.

Third Casualty

Previously reported missing in action Oct. 18, was Staff Sgt. Alvin Fisher, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Fisher of this city.

All three of the missing men were members of the company which left Webster City in February, 1941 for training at Camp Claiborne, La. In January, 1942, the company was transferred overseas among the first American soldiers to be convoyed across the Atlantic.

Source: Daily Freeman Journal, November 6, 1944


Fifth ING Casualty Lost in Action in Italian Sector

Staff Sgt. Robert Simpson, son of George and Mary Simpson of this city, is missing in action in Italy according to the War Department message received by his parents.

Missing since Oct. 18, Sergeant Simpson was a section leader with the Iowa National Guard unit from this city attached to the 34th “Red Bull” infantry division.

This makes the fifth Hamilton county serviceman to be reported missing in action in the Italian zone since Oct. 16.  All were members of the National Guard unit, which left Webster City in February, 1941, and trained at Camp Claiborne, La., before being convoyed overseas in January, 1942.

In addition to Sergeant Simpson, the following men have been reported missing in telegrams received here since last weekend:
Staff Sgt. Alvin Fisher, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Fisher, Webster City;
T. Sgt. Arthur Philbrook, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Philbrook, Webster City;
Pvt. Myrl Ray, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ray, Webster City;
Pfc. Robert Read, brother of Hadley Reed, Stanhope.

Source: Daily Freeman Journal, November 8, 1944

2 MORE MEN NOW CAPTIVES
T. Sgt. Philbrook and Pfc. Dilley Had Been Missing 

Two more Webster City soldiers, previously reported missing in action in Germany and Italy, have been reported prisoners of war in messages received here by relatives.

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Philbrook have been notified by the War Department that their son, T. Sgt. Arthur C. Philbrook, a member of the 34th Infantry, was a captive of the nazis after having been reported missing since Oct. 18, in Italy.

This makes the third out of four Webster City Iowa National Guardsmen to be listed as prisoners after being announced as missing since mid-October.  Staff Sgt. Robert Simpson and Staff Sgt. Alvin Fisher were announced Tuesday to be prisoners of war. Official word on the whereabouts of Pvt. Myrl Ray, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ray, has not yet been received.

Mrs. Lawrence Dilley received word Wednesday that her husband, Private First Class Dilley, missing since Oct. 4., in Germany, is now a nazi prisoner.

Private Dilley, who has been overseas since August, was wounded in action Sept. 16, while serving with his infantry unit.  He reported back for duty at the front Sept. 20, and then was listed as missing Oct. 4. The Webster City serviceman has been in the Army since December, 1943.

Source:  Daily Freeman Journal, January 3, 1945

NOTES:

Arthur Clarence Philbrook was born June 24, 1922, to Albert Clarence and Eunice Irene Cornett-Coslow Philbrook. He died Dec. 27, 2014, and is buried in Graceland Cemetery, Webster City, IA.

Sgt. Philbrook was a section leader in the “Red Bull” division. Arthur served in North Ireland Scotland, England, North Africa and participated in fighting in Italy through the Anzio beachhead. He was reported missing in 1944. He became a prisoner of the Germans near the Po River Valley (Bologna) Oct. 17, 1944 and interned at Stalag 7A near Moosburg, Germany.

Arthur was a 70-year member and Past Commander of American Legion Post #191, D.A.V. Chapter 29, Mid Iowa Chapter of American Ex-Prisoners of War, where he was a Past Commander and the Co. E 133rd Infantry 34th Division Association.

Sources:

Daily Freeman Journal and ancestry.com
WW2pow.info
World War II Memorial

Obituary:

Arthur Philbrook, 92, of Webster City, died Saturday, December 27, 2014, at the Van Diest Medical Center. Funeral services will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, December 30, 2014, at Asbury Methodist Church with Pastor Jeff Flagg, officiating. Following the services burial will be held at Graceland Cemetery with full military rites conducted by the American Legion Post #191. Visitation will be held from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Monday at the Foster Funeral and Cremation Center.
Arthur Clarence Philbrook was born June 24, 1922, on a farm between Webster City and Kamrar, the son of Albert C. and Eunice Irene Cornett-Coslow Philbrook. He started school at the Woodleaf rural school and later attended White Fox rural school before moving to Bancroft with his parents, where he graduated in 1940.
He then returned to Hamilton County with his family and enlisted in the Webster City, Iowa National Guard (Co. E. 133rd infantry, 34th Div.). On February 10th, 1941, that company was federalized into the U.S. Army and on February 28, 1941, they began their training at Camp Claiborne, LA. On New Year's Day, 1942 they were sent to Fort Dix N.J. after getting passports, physicals, etc. they were put on the ship USS Barnett and traveled to Northern Ireland (Belfast).
Arthur served in the European Theatre in North Ireland, Scotland, England, North Africa and participated in some of the bitterest fighting in Italy through the Anzio Beachhead. He was taken prisoner by the German Forces near the Po River Valley (Bologna) on October 17, 1944. They were transported into Germany in box cars and interned at Stalag VIIA near Moosburg, Germany where he spent the last six and a half months of the war. He was liberated on April 29, 1945, and flown to Camp Lucky Strike in France and then traveled by ship back to New York.
Arthur married Barbara Jean Crane on January 4, 1947, at the Little Brown Church in Nashua. He is survived by his wife Barbara, son Mark (Laura) Philbrook of Littleton, CO, daughters, Rebecca (Dennis) McCollough of Luzerne, IA and Virginia (Eric) Eade of Holmen, WI; sisters, Ellen Hall of Portola, CA, Kathleen Hemmen of Webster City; brother, Richard Philbrook of Wamego, KS; three grandsons; six granddaughters and three great-grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by his parents, son, Steven; brothers, Roy Coslow, John Philbrook, Bob Philbrook and a brother in infancy, Cyrus William Philbrook.
Arthur was a member of the Asbury United Methodist Church, the American Legion Post #191 where he was a 70 year member and Past Commander, the D.A.V. Chapter 29, the Mid Iowa Chapter of American Ex-Prisoners of War, where he was a Past Commander and the Co. E 133rd Infantry 34th Division Association.
Arthur was employed with Maudlin Construction Company for 40 years and with Becker Construction for 18 years. He was very proud of the fact that he worked until age 80. He loved his big garden and was known for growing the best tomatoes. He especially enjoyed sharing the produce and handing out advice. Art loved God, his family, his country and never took his freedom for granted.

Source: Foster Funeral Home, Webster City, Iowa.