Plymouth County

Kenneth R. Paulin

 

18 KNOWN DEAD FROM PLYMOUTH  
Speaking at the city cemetery Decoration Day, Morse Hoorneman gave the names of 18 Plymouth countyans reported killed in action, or died in line of duty in the present war.

No complete record has been compiled of Plymouth County wounded and prisoners of war.  Those listed as dead are those whose bodies have actually been recovered, or those missing in action under circumstances which preclude the possibility that they may be alive as prisoners. The dead are:
KENNETH PAULIN, of LeMars.
EARL JEFFERS, of LeMars.
GLEN K. COLLINS, whose parents live in Akron and who worked in Plymouth County before he went into the service, and who was a member of K Company.
HAROLD MACK, of LeMars, who is reported missing, for whom hope has, I believe, been given up.
DONALD LANGENDORFER, of LeMars.
DONALD BEY, of Akron.
JOSEPH KONZ, who was formerly from Remsen.
JAMES MONTAGNE, of Akron.
DONALD HARNACK, of Remsen.
EILERT W. SEGGERMAN, of Remsen.
HERMAN STOOS, of LeMars.
WILLIAM ROSENOW, of Merrill.
LEO ROHLFS, of Craig.
RONALD CAREY, of LeMars.
WALTER REICH, of Struble.
ROY McCARTHY, Westfield.
CLYDE PELTON, missing in action.

Mr. Hoorneman quoted from a letter received a few weeks ago by The Globe-Post from members of K Company, then already in action in Tunisia, in which they made it clear that fighting forces in the field rely upon, and need all of the support they can get from home.

“This letter,” he said, “in which are included the thoughts of boys we all knew—some of whom are no dead—and others wounded—is flecked with mud—Tunisian mud.  It is the very soil in which many Americans, who have paid the supreme sacrifice, now lie buried. When I read over these lines, which convey clearly that our boys out there—and on many another front—often feel that we have forgotten them—I experience a feeling of poignant regret.”

But, the speaker added, the opportunity to make our fighting forces feel that we appreciate their sacrifices and are with them heart and soul, is a continuing opportunity. He urged that more and caring letters by written to men in the fighting services.

Previously to the ceremony at the city cemetery, a program was given at St. Joseph cemetery and the speaker there was Rev. Bauer, of St. James parish.

Fr. Bauer’s theme was the eroding and negative effect of the red. He pointed out that a hatred does not win wars and does not build enduring peace, but hatred is a handicap, rather than an asset, in any war effort.  He warned that hatreds now during the present war may be carried over into the ensuing negotiations, and sow the seeds for future wars.

Source: LeMars Globe-Post, May 31, 1943

IOWA HONOR ROLL

These Iowans, like those pictured in this section in previous weeks, have given their lives for their country. All have been killed in combat or have died in prison camps. The fourth line under each name shows where the man last served.

Source: The  Des Moines Register, Sunday, April 30, 1944  (photo included)

PLYMOUTH COUNTY MEN WHO DIED IN WORLD WAR II
Compiled by War Records Division of State Department of History


46. Paulin, Kenneth R.

LeMars

Killed at Corregidor

Source: LeMars Sentinel, June 15, 1945