Dickinson County

Mervin Thompson

 

 

Name Iowa Men Held Prisoners

Navy, Was Department List Men of City and the Area

Washington -- The navy department announced Thursday the names of 1,044 United States Navy personnel, including six Iowans, held as prisoners of war by the Japanese, mostly in the Philippine Islands.

Iowans listed were:

LeRoy F. Barber, gunner’s mate, son of Mrs. Nora Barber, 920 Wright Avenue, Sioux City;
Milford Nielsen, yeoman, son of Mrs. Hattie Westphalen, Hartley;
John W. Reimer, Jr. aviation chief metalsmith, son of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Reimer, Sr., Havelock;
Steve M. Sorensen, chief boatswain’s mate, brother of Hans K. Sorensen, 123 S. Davidson Street, Sioux City;
Rudolph P. Steck, chief commissary steward, son of Mr. Carrie Garber, 416 S. Lafayette Street, Sioux City;
William B. Westerberg, boilermaker, son of John A. ; Westerberg, Hinton.

Washington
– The war department has announced the following Iowas as being held prisoners of war by Italy:

Private Milford W. Beldt, son of Mrs. Albona Beldt, route 1, Sheldon;
Corporal Arthur P. Clemitson, son of Halvor A. Clemitson, route 2, Graettinger;
Private Marion DeVries, son of Mrs. Jennie DeVries, route 2, Orange City;
Private Delbert J. Beirne, son of Mrs. Bright A. Beirne, Denison;
Corporal Richard A. Lavrenz, son of Fred W. Lavrenz, Burt;
Private Mervin L. Thompson, son of Lewis Thompson, Okoboji.

Source: The Sioux City Journal, May 14, 1943

THREE OKOBOJI VETERANS RETURN HOME

Okoboji residents celebrated an impromptu Old Home Week recently when numerous service men arrived home, some of them from German prisoner of war camps. Others are expected to arrive home soon. Three youths arrived from the west coast on Friday and T-Sgt. Ernest K. Harker arrived that day from two years in a prison camp. On Tuesday S-Sgt. Scott Menefee arrived home after a year’s absence, five months of it in a German prison camp. Jack Gipner’s arrival from England where he was with the air force, is expected daily. First home was Mervin Thompson, who had been a prisoner since the African fighting. Also among the first home was Lt. William Metz, a Sioux City youth, whose parents live near The Inn each season.

Source: The Milford Mail, Milford, Iowa, Thursday, June 28, 1945, Pages 1 & 8