Black Hawk County

Pfc. Clem Stocks

 

 

 

3 WATERLOO MEN KILLED IN ACTION

[Among] Waterloo men Friday were added to the list of those killed in action Pfc. Clem Stocks.

Private Stocks, 27, son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Stocks, 604 Rhey street, was reported killed in action Dec. 31, 1944, in Belgium, in a telegram received by his wife, Fonda, who with her three daughters, Judith, Jacquline and Jane, resides in Lilydale acres.

He entered service in March, 1944, trained at Camp Hood, Tex., and went overseas in September. He had seen service in France and Germany.

Born Oct. 13, 1917, in Raymond, Ia., he attended school there and moved to Waterloo with his parents in 1932. On Nov. 5, 1939, he married Fonda Nicholson, of Waterloo, and was employed by the Rath Packing Co. prior to entering service.

Surviving besides his parents, wife and three daughters are two brothers, Roy, Lilydale aces, and Carl, at home; also seven sisters, Mrs. Arthur Thompson, Lakeland, Fla., and Mrs. Leonard Bahl, Dora, Della, Myrle, Helen and Mathilda, all at home.

Source: Waterloo Daily Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, Friday, January 19, 1945, Page 1 (photo included)

 

Pfc. Clem Stocks, formerly of Route 6, and husband of Mrs. Fonda Stocks, has been posthumously awarded the Bronze Star for “heroic achievement in connection with military operations against the enemy in Belgium Dec. 31, 1944.”

Source: Waterloo Daily Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, Tuesday, September 18, 1945, Page 3

Three Bodies of War Dead Due Today

The bodies of three Waterloo boys will be among the 15 northeast Iowa veterans aboard the United States army transport Robert Burns which is scheduled to dock at New York City today, it was learned here yesterday.

[Among] the Waterloo veterans:

Pfc. Clem Stocks, next of kin, Mrs. Fonda Mae Stocks of 520 Rhey street.

The majority of these dead are being returned from Henri Chapelle military cemetery at Eupen, Belgium. Some are from the cemetery at St. Laurent-sur-Mer, 10 miles west of Bayeux, France. Included in the group are many men who fell on the furious D-Day assault on Omaha beach.

The dead will be buried in private or national cemeteries according to the wishes of next-of-kin.

Source: Waterloo Daily Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, Sunday, November 23, 1947, Page 11