Muscatine County

Pfc. Richard Schreurs

 

 

MISSING IN ACTION—Pfc. Richard Schreurs, serving with an infantry division of the Third army, was reported missing in action in Germany, Nov. 24. He is the son of Mrs. Anna Schreurs, 1172 New Hampshire street, and the husband of Mrs. Arlene Schreurs, now living in Lancaster, Wis.

Pfc. Schreurs was slightly wounded by a German sniper in France in July. His wife has received the Purple Heart awarded him for his wounds and also the Combat Infantryman Badge he received for service in France.

Source: Muscatine Journal and News-Tribune, December 15, 1944 (photo included)

LIST OF MISSING IN ACTION GREW IN 1944
Among those from this area who have been listed as missing in action in official dispatches to next of kin, and upon casualty lists of the armed services, are:

PFC. RICHARD SCHREURS
—Serving in the infantry of the U. S. Third army, Pfc. Richard Schreurs, son of Mrs. Anna Schreurs, 1172 New Hampshire street, was reported missing in action in Germany since Nov. 24, 1944. He was previously reported slightly wounded by a German sniper in France in July 1944. His wife is living in Lancaster, Wis.

Source: Muscatine Journal and News-Tribune, Friday, December 29, 1944

Richard Schreurs Nazi Prisoner, Message States

Pfc. Richard Schreurs, son of Mrs. Anna Schreurs, 1172 New Hampshire street, is a prisoner of Germany, according to word received here Saturday. The message was sent to his wife, Mrs. Arlene Schruers, who resides at Lancaster, Wis., and was relayed here.

Serving with an infantry division in the Third army, he was listed as missing in action on Nov. 24, in a message which came to relatives on Dec. 13, 1944. Earlier, in July, he was hospitalized for a time suffering from a wound in the left arm inflicted by a German sniper while in action in France.

Pfc. Schreurs had been overseas for about eight months. He had trained at North Camp Hood, Tex., and at Camp Butner, N.C.

Source: Muscatine Journal and News-Tribune, February 12, 1945

WAR END NEWS PROVIDES HAPPINESS FOR FAMILIES OF NAZI WAR PRISONERS

News of victory in Europe had special significance in many Muscatine homes where relatives have “sweated it through” for months and, in some cases, years with their husbands, son and brothers who were being held in prisoner of war camps in Germany.

In Other Camps.
Pfc. Richard Schreurs, 1172 New Hampshire street;

Source: Muscatine Journal and News-Tribune, Monday May 7, 1945

Richard Schreurs, Held Prisoner, Safe and Well

Word that PFC Richard Schreurs, army infantryman who had been a prisoner of war in Germany for about six months, has been freed was received Thursday by his mother, Mrs. Anna Schreurs, 1172 New Hampshire street.

Information of her son’s liberation came in a letter from an Army chaplain in Germany with whom PFC. Schreurs had visited. The letter stated that the liberated soldier was safe and well and in good spirits.

PFC. Schreurs was listed as missing in action in Germany on Nov. 24, 1944, in a message received on Dec. 13, by his wife, Mrs. Arlene Schreurs. Word that he was a prisoner of the Germans was received here on Feb. 10, of this year.

PFC. Schreurs had been hospitalized for a short time in England in July for wounds in the left arm inflicted by a German sniper. He has been in service for about two years, and holds the Combat Infantryman’s Badge for service in France.

His brother, Staff Sgt. Robert Schreurs, who has been serving in the Mediterranean theater of war for the past 32 months, is in the United States en route home.

Source: Muscatine Journal and News-Tribune, May 18, 1945 (photo included)

Richard Schreurs, Held Prisoner, Back in States

PFC. Richard Schreurs, army infantryman released from a German prison camp where he was held for six months, has returned to the United States and is expected home shortly, according to his mother, Mrs. Anna Schreurs, 1172 New Hampshire street. PFC. Schreurs was reported missing in action in Germany on Nov. 24, 1944, and word that he was a prisoner of war came to his wife, Mrs. Arlene Schreurs, on Feb. 10, of this year.

Source: Muscatine Journal and News-Tribune, June 14, 1945