Cerro Gordo County

S/Sgt. Robert E. Schinnow

 

 

WHEREABOUTS

Mrs. Robert Schinnow, 812 11th N.E., has just received word that her husband, stationed somewhere in New Guinea, had been promoted to the rank of staff sergeant. Sgt. Schinnow is the son of Mrs. Bertha Smith, 1643 Delaware N.E., and Emil Schinnow, 409 ½ North Federal. Sgt. Schinnow has been in the New Guinea area since last May.

Source: Mason City Globe-Gazette, February 16, 1944

Sgt. Schinnow Died Nov. 9, New Guinea

Staff Sgt. Robert E. Schinnow died in Hollandia, Dutch New Guinea, on Nov. 9, according to a telegram received by his wife at 812 11th N.E., Saturday morning. No details as to how he died were given, but it was stated that a letter would follow.

S/Sgt. Schinnow went overseas a year ago last May and had been stationed in Australia. Before entering the service in December 1942, he was employed at Decker’s.

Besides his wife, S/Sgt. Schinnow is survived by his 3 children; his mother, Mrs. Bertha Smith, 1643 Delaware N.E.; and his father, Emil Schinnow, 409 ½ North Federal.

Source: Mason City Globe-Gazette, November 18, 1944

Letter Day Before He Died: "Everything Going Swell"

Sgt. Schinnow Wrote His Associates in Packinghouse Union

On the day before he met his death in Dutch New Guinea on Nov. 9, Staff Sgt. Robert E. Schinnow wrote a letter to his former associates at Local 38 of the United Packinghouse Workers at Decker's, in which he expressed the hope that all its members would soon be back again

"Everything is going swell over here," Sgt Schinnow had written, "So I hope it won't be too long until all members who are absent are home again. The things I miss most over here are those weekly hour guarantees.

"My duties call for 24 hours a day but no difference in pay; it's always the same. Oh well, c'est la guerre. Well, keep up the good work at home and we will try to do the same over here. Until I see you again good luck and say hello to all the gang at Walt's," concluded Sgt. Schinnow.

No details of Schinnow's death have been received by his family at 812 11th N.E., other than stating that he had died on Nov. 9 --

Source: Mason City Globe-Gazette, November 22, 1944 (photo included)

Sgt. Schinnow Memorial Services Held Here Sunday
“Increased Vigilance Our Part,” Says Rogness in Sermon at Trinity


Memorial services were conducted in the Trinity Lutheran Church Sunday afternoon for Staff Sgt. Robert E. Schinnow, with the Rev. Alvin N. Rogness, pastor, officiating.

Mr. Rogness in his sermon stated that although non of these men who are in the war chose it—it came as a great whirlpool and drew them all in—yet it is for us to believe that those who lose their lives do not lose them in vain.

“God in His infinite wisdom will see to it that real fruits are accomplished and it is for us to make sure by increased vigilance over these things for which we are fighting that they did not die in vain,” said Mr. Rogness.

Miss Marian Johnson sang “Beautiful Saviour” and “My Faith Looks Up to Thee” with Miss Beatrice Lysne at the organ.

Sgt. Schinnow died in Hollandia, Dutch New Guinea, of a skull fracture on Nov. 9. He is survived by his wife and 3 children; his mother, Mrs. Bertha Smith; his father, Emil Schinnow, all of Mason City; also a brother, Emmett, of Mason City, and another brother, Herbert, of Vancouver, Wash.

Source: Mason City Globe-Gazette, December 18, 1944 (photo included)

Source: Mason City Globe-Gazette, November 8, 1947

BODIES OF IOWA VETS RETURNED
North Iowans Among Yanks on Transport


Remains of 4,459 Americans who lost their lives during World War II are being returned to San Francisco from Manila aboard the United States Army Transport Lt. George W. G. Boyce, the department of the army announced Monday.

Armed forces dead originally interred in temporary military cemeteries in New Guinea and the Philippine Islands are among those being brought to this country.

A total of 110 remains are being returned upon instructions of next of kin residing in Iowa.

North Iowans in the list include the following:
S. Sgt. Robert E. Schinnow, Mason City.

Source: Mason City Globe-Gazette, June 1, 1948

S/Sgt. Robert Schinnow Rites To Be Held Monday

The body of Staff Sgt. Robert E. Schinnow, who died in New Guinea, Nov. 9, 1944, will be returned to Mason City Monday at 10 a.m. via the Rock Island Lines.

Services will be conducted at 2 p.m. Monday at the Major Memorial chapel, with the Rev. Alvin N. Rogness, pastor of the Trinity Lutheran Church, officiating.

Sgt. Schinnow was born Sept. 15, 1913, in Mason City. He entered the service in December, 1942, and went overseas May, 1943, and was first stationed in Australia. As a civilian, he was employed at the Jacob E. Decker and Sons packing plant.

Surviving are his wife and 3 children, his mother, Mrs. Bertha Smith, and his father, Emil Schinnow, all of Mason City, and 2 brothers, Emmett Schinnow, Mason City, and Herbert Schinnow, Nora Springs.

Burial will be at Memorial Park cemetery. The Major funeral home in charge.

Source: Mason City Globe-Gazette, June 28, 1948 (photo included)

R. E. Schinnow Services Held
Rites Conducted at Local Funeral Home


Funeral services for Staff Sgt. Robert E. Schinnow, who died in New Guinea Nov. 9, 1944, were conducted at the Major Memorial chapel Monday afternoon, with the Rev. Alvin N. Rogness, pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church, officiating.

Mrs. Roy Servison played obsequial music on the organ.

Mrs. Clifford Dehnert and Mrs. John Brown were in charge of flowers.

Military services were conducted by the American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars, with John G. Brown, Legion commander and Robert Platts, acting commander of the V.F.W., W. D. Thrams was chaplain and John Pinta, bugler.

At Memorial Park cemetery the color guard consisted of Art McCoid of the V. F. W. and John A. Brown, American Legion. Color Bearers of the American Legion were Don Lattimer and Oscar Jewell and Mrs. J. H. Sprau.

V. F. W. Color Bearers were John Pinta and Nick Degen. V. F. W. Auxiliary Color Bearers were Mrs. John Pinta and Mrs. Otto Englebretson.

Pallbearers were Richard Wills, James Sheehy, Elmer Wodarcak, Richard Scholl, Ed Johnson and Robert Platts. The fire squad was from Co. H. of the 133rd Infantry. S/Sgt. Max Morphew was the escort and with Comdr. Brown folded the flag and present it to the family.

Meeting the train in the morning, the American Legion color guard consisted of Oscar Jewell and John A. Brown; the American Legion color bearers were W. D. Lattimer and John G. Brown. The American Legion Auxiliary color bearers were Mrs. Hershel Gore and Mrs. Fred Heddens.

The V. F. W. color bearers was Tyler Stewart. The V. F. W. Auxiliary color bearers were Mrs. Grace Jensen and Mrs. Otto Englebretsen.

Pallbearers at the train were Richard Wills, James Sheehy, Elmer Wodarcak, Terrill Tilton, Robert Platts, and Richard Scholl.

Burial was at Memorial Park cemetery. The Major funeral home in charge.

Source: Mason City Globe-Gazette, June 30, 1948