Muscatine County

Sgt. Walter Sammons

 

 

 

MEDALS, CITATIONS AWARDED TO MEN FROM THIS LOCALITY

Ribbons, crosses and emblems earned for heroism while serving a nation at war will adorn the uniform of many a warrior from Muscatine and community when he returns from battle in World War No. 2.

For this area’s fighting sons have already earned a distinguished collection of awards. News stories from war centers have told of the acts of these men who have won distinction in battles—on the land, on the sea, and in the air.

From the most remote battle areas and from the most active theaters of war have come news stories of citations bestowed for heroism, for acts “beyond the call of duty,” and other commendable performances of young men who have gone forth from this community.

Many will be wearers of the “Purple Heart,” an award made for injuries suffered while on duty.

For some, the actions which merited official recognition, brought physical injuries—injuries so serious they meant the end of the war insofar as the individual hero was concerned.

Others, who suffered wounds of a lesser degree, recovered sufficiently at hospitals abroad to permit their re-entry into actual combat duty. For sulfa drugs, blood plasma and penicillin have spelled the difference between life and death, between slow and rapid recovery to many who were injured.

Some of the wounded from this area have returned to hospitals in this country to undergo further treatment and the possibility of return to war theaters or final discharge from the service.

The list of those who have suffered injuries or incurred ailments while in training in this country has added to the numbers of Muscatine service men who have already received honorable discharges or are scheduled for release from military service.

A partial list of those who suffered injuries while in active service abroad or while on duty in camps of this country, gathered from information supplied to the Journal are listed here:

Sgt. Walter Sammons, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Sammons of Mt. Pleasant, was wounded in action on Jan. 6, and was hospitalized in England before being returned to the United States in July.

He came to Muscatine in August for a 30-day furlough from the O’Reilly General Hospital at Springfield, Mo. His wounds consisted of five perforations of the intestines from an airplane bomb in the Tunisian campaign.

Source: Muscatine Journal and News-Tribune, Annual Edition, December 30, 1943