Cerro Gordo County

Capt. Lawrence K. Meade

 

 

MEADE CADET AT WEST POINT

Takes Up Life at Military Academy
With Drills and Other Training.

Lawrence K. Meade, son of Dr. C. L. Meade, 1010 West State street,  has been admitted to the U. S. Military academy at West Point to the Fifth company, in orders issued by Major General William R. Smith, superintendent, according to word received here. Mr. Meade was appointed to West Point from the national guard of Mason City.

Mr. Meade’s day starts at 5:50 a. m. each morning with first call for reveille. His day is almost entirely taken up with military drills, lectures, calisthenics and athletics. Guard duty, rifle marksmanship and bayonet training as well as infantry close order drill are all included in the schedule of the first month prescribed by General Smith.

On August 4 Mr. Meade, in company with approximately 325 other plebes or freshman will be assigned to regular companies in the Corps of Cadets and participate in all the parades reviews and other ceremonies. During this month his schedule of instruction will include swimming and dancing, each cadet being required to be proficient in both of these subjects.

General Smith has also directed that on August 19 the plebe class take a five day hike. On this march Mr. Meade will live in a "pup" tent and get his meals from a rolling kitchen. Instruction in march discipline, camping, field cooking, camp sanitation, care of the feet and equipment will be emphasized.

Academic studies will start on Sept. 3, instruction starting at 8 a. m. and closing at 3 p. m. Mr. Meade’s class will be divided into sections of 12 cadets, in accordance with the usual system of academic instruction. This insures each cadet receiving individual attention in each subject.

Source:  The Globe Gazette, Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, July 14, 1930, Page 14 (photo included)

BITS ABOUT 'EM

Lieut. Lawrence K. Meade has left for Fort Sheridan, Ill., to take up his work with the third field artillery after spending the summer with his parents, Dr. and Mrs. C. L. Meade, 630 Eighth street northeast. He was graduated from the United States Military academy in June.

Source: The Globe Gazette, Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, September 12, 1934, Page 8

CAPTAIN LAWRENCE MEADE of MASON CITY BATTLES JAPS

Local Man Believed Among U. S. Forces Now at Corregidor

Capt. Lawrence Meade, 29, son of Dr. and Mrs. C. L. Meade, 504 Ninth street southeast, was believed to be among the valiant band of American fighting off Japanese attacks on Corregidor fortress in Manila bay Saturday.

Mrs. Meade received a radiogram dated Dec. 26 from her husband in Manila, stating: "All's well. Letter on way, Merry Christmas."

Captain Meade embarked from San Francisco, Cal., on Nov. 1 for the Philippines and his parents have received a letter from him Nov. 22 from Corregidor. His wife, who with their son lives at Redwood City, Cal., also heard from him about that time, and in that letter Captain Meade said that he might be moved up to Fort Wimp, on the west coast of Luzon, since then scene of some of the heaviest fighting in the Battle of the Pacific.

It's known that he has probably been in the thick of the fighting, for he is stationed with the coast artillery, in an anti-aircraft division. He had been an instructor in anti-aircraft.

Captain Meade was graduated from the United States military academy at West Point in 1934. He has served at Pearl Harbor base, in Texas, at Fort Sill, and other military points. He was formerly in the field artillery, later requesting a transfer to the coast artillery.

He visited with his parents here last October, just before leaving for the Philippines. At that time he expressed the opinion that war with Japan was imminent.

Source: The Globe Gazette, Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, Saturday, January 03, 1942, Page 14 (photo included)

CAPT. LAWRENCE MEADE, MASON CITY,
in BATAAN BATTLE LINE

Says 'Hello' to Tojo With Shells
From Big Guns in Philippines

At least on Mason Cityan is in the thick of the fighting on the Bataan peninsula in Luzon, Philippine islands, it was revealed Thursday in a dispatch written Monday by Clarke Lee, Associated Press correspondent with USAFFE.

The Mason City man is Capt. Lawrence Meade, son of Dr. and Mrs. C. L. Meade, 805 Ninth street southeast. He is commander of one of the artillery batteries which have been so successful in repulsing attempted break-throughs by superior Japanese forces striving to get to the shore nearest the entrance to Manila bay.

The A. P. correspondent told in his dispatch of visiting the artillery positions. "These are to say 'hello' to Tojo," he quoted Captain Meade as saying when a battery of big guns blasted away at the Japanese. The dispatch continued:
"Tojo, however, talked back a few minutes later with a series of rounds from 75s and 105s which spattered our fox holes with shrapnel and made more deep bomb shell holes all around the guns, but caused no damage or casualties.
"The Japanese fired twice the number of shells we had sent over, and Col. Alexander Quintard, regimental commander, explained, 'that's what we call retaliatory fire. It looks like Tojo got a little riled, which means we probably got our target. We like it when we make him waste so many shells.'"

Colonel Quintard praised highly the conduct of American officers and Filipino troops.

"All are taking it and handing back in fine style, although our work would be more effective with assistance of a little aerial spotting of targets and observation of results," he said.

Throughout the Japanese shelling the Filipino troops calmly stuck to their telephones and lookout stations, noting results. After 30 minutes other United States batteries opened fire and "neutralized" Japanese guns, which meant they either hit the guns or made the gunners seek shelter.
While the Japanese were firing, Colonel Quintart kept track of the shells, calling "here they come" as the whistle was heard, followed shortly by the explosion, the whine of shrapnel, and then the distant boom of guns.

"When the shooting stopped we brushed the dirt away, but discovered no one was hurt."

Quintard quoted the old gag about the futility of ducking, since if a shell has your name on it, it will get you.

Source: The Globe Gazette, Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, Thursday, January 22, 1942, Page 8

MASON CITYAN SERIOUSLY WOUNDED in BATAAN ACTION

Capt. Lawrence Meade Hurt Fighting With MacArthur Forces

Capt. Lawrence K. Meade of Mason City was seriously wounded while in action with Gen. Douglas MacArthur's forces on Bataan peninsula in the Philippine islands, his parents revealed Sunday.

Capt. Meade’s wife, who resides at Redwood City, Cal., was notified by the war department her husband was wounded on Feb. 26 and immediately sent word to the local man's parents, Dr. and Mrs. C. L. Meade, 501 Ninth street southeast.

The war department message read: "Deeply regret to inform you that your husband, Capt. L. K. Meade, was seriously wounded in action in the Philippine islands on Feb. 26. Progress reports will be forwarded as received."

Captain Meade is commander of one of the field artillery batteries which have successfully repulsed attempted break-throughs by Japanese forces seeking to get to the shore nearest the American forts controlling the entrance to Manila bay.

He cabled Christmas greetings from Manila on Dec. 26. After the fall of Manila he was believed to be with the anti-aircraft in the Corregidor fortress. Later, however, through Associated Press dispatches, it was learned he was on Bataan peninsula with MacArthur.

He embarked from San Francisco, Cal., last Nov. 1 for the Philippines and a letter was received from him on Nov. 22 from Corregidor, where he was an instructor in anti-aircraft gunnery.

Captain Meade is a graduate of the United States military academy at West Point. He has served at Pearl Harbor and many other bases since his graduation in 1934.

He visited here with his parents last October, just before leaving for the Philippines.

Source: The Globe Gazette, Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, Thursday, January 22, 1942, Page 8

JAPS TAKE BATAAN

CORREGIDOR STANDS; FEAR U. S. LOSSES ARE NEARLY 36,853

WASHINGTON, (AP) - Secretary of War Stimson reported Thursday that Lieut. Gen Jonathan Wainwrith's force on the Philippine's Bataan peninsula numbered 36,853 effective troops when their resistance apparently collapsed. The secretary indicated at a press conference that the bulk of this force had been either killed or captured.

President Roosevelt has authorized the Philippine commander to make any decision he deemed necessary in light of events, Stimson said. . .

Mason Cityans on Bataan

Captain Lawrence Meade, son of Dr. and Mrs. C. L. Meade, 504 Ninth street southeast, and Pvt. Thomas Boyle, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Boyle, 1424 East State street, were among the Americans fighting on Bataan peninsula in the Philippine islands when the Japs overwhelmed the Yankees Thursday.
Last word heard from Captain Meade, an officer in anti-aircraft artillery was on Feb. 26, when his wife in Redwood City, Cal., was notified that he was seriously wounded in action on Bataan, while fighting under Gen. Douglas MacArthur, who was there heading the forces in the Philippines.

Private Boyle, who was a mechanic in the army air corps, was last heard from in a letter received by his parents recently, which was dated Jan. 14.

Source: The Globe Gazette, Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, Thursday, April 09, 1942, Page 1

Daughter Is Born To Lawrence Meades

A 7 pound daughter was born June 5 to Mrs. Lawrence Meade at Letterman hospital in San Francisco, Cal., it was learned here Friday. Her husband, a captain in the field artillery, was with Gen. Douglas MacArthur's forces in the Philippines and is now believed to be held prisoner by the Japanese.

In a recent letter to Captain Meade’s father, Dr. C. L. Meade of Mason City, the officer's wife wrote: "When Corregidor fell I lost control for a few minutes when Joe (their first son) was near. He wanted to know if I was crying about daddy. When I nodded yes, he put his arms around me and said, 'Don't cry, Mommie; he'll come back and I won't ever leave you.' It almost broke my heart, but he was so sweet. He keeps talking about the things we four will do when daddy comes home."

Captain Meade’s wife has a brother, Frank, also last reported on Bataan peninsula, and two other brothers in the navy.
* * * *

THEY FOUGHT ON BATAAN 

Victory Edition, Page 39
The fate of three Mason Cityans remained a mystery, a mystery on which Tokio (sic) has failed to cast any light, as the local men were believed taken prisoners with the fall of Bataan, and later, the fortress of Corregidor, in the Philippines on May 6. Thought held as prisoners of war were Capt. Lawrence Meade, son of Dr. and Mrs. C. L. Meade, 504 Ninth street, and Pvt. John Cannella of the United States marine corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cannella, 415 Sixth street southwest.

Captain Meade, who fought under Gen. Douglas MacArthur with a field aircraft unit on Bataan, was seriously wounded on Feb. 26. A cable March 29 notified his wife he had recovered.

Private Thomas Boyle, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Boyle, 1424 East State street, an airplane mechanic stationed at Clark field, moved to Bataan when the Japs took Clark, and the last word from him was a letter he wrote in January.

Private Cannella was with the Leathernecks in Shanghai when war broke out and he and the other marines were sent to Bataan the following day. When Corregidor fell it was known he was at that fortress, but the fate of he and the other two Mason Cityans in the Philippines is still known.

Source: The Globe Gazette, Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, Friday, June 12, 1942, Page 12

LAST REPORTED IN PHILIPPINES

No word has been received from three Mason Cityans who are presumed to be prisoner of the Japanese since the battles of Bataan and Corregidor. Last word from Capt. Lawrence Meade, son of Dr. and Mrs. C. L. Meade, 504 Ninth street southeast, was received in March, when it was reported he had recovered from wounds received on Bataan in February. Last work from Pvt. Thomas Boyle, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Boyle, 1424 East State street, was a letter written in January, when he had been moved to Bataan. Pvt. John Cannella, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cannella, 415 Sixth street southwest, was known to be at Corregidor when it fell.

Source: The Globe Gazette, Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, Friday, October 30, 1942, Page 20

CAPT. LAWRENCE MEADE DIES in JAPANESE PRISON CAMP

Is Son of Dr. Meade;
Wife and Children Live in California

Capt. Lawrence Meade has been reported as dead on the Philippines, a prisoner of the Japanese. He is the son of Dr. and Mrs. C. L. Meade, 504 Ninth street southeast, and his wife and two children make their home in San Diego, Cal.

Captain Meade’s military career began in the national guard here. He continued it at West Point military academy from which he was graduated in 1934. His first assignment was to Fort Sheridan, Ill, where he remained for two years.

During that time, he married Miss Betsy Isabel Burgess, the daughter of Maj. and Mrs. Lloyd Burgess of Fort Sheridan.
His next base was in Hawaii for two years, after which he returned to the states to Fort Sill, Okla. After a year there, he went for a time to Fort Crockett, Tex. It was at this time that he transferred from the field artillery into the coastal artillery and he was sent to the Philippines as an instructor in anti-aircraft Nov. 1, 1941.

Previous to that, he had a short leave which he spent here in October. He arrived in the Philippines exactly 20 days after he left the states, and was there at the time of the Pearl Harbor bombing.

When Captain Meade was last heard from, he was on the Bataan peninsula with a Filipino outfit. He was seriously wounded in action Feb. 26, 1942, and nothing has been heard of him since. However, a prisoner list from the Philippines listed him as a Japanese prisoner.

Captain Meade has one sister, Mrs. E. B. Eggers of Minneapolis. His children are Lawrence Kent Meade II, 5 years old, and Lloyd Ellen Meade, one year old.

Source: The Globe Gazette, Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, Tuesday, June 22, 1943, Page 7

 

MEMORIAL SERVICE HELD FOR
LAWRENCE MEADE AT CHURCH

Gold Star Placed on
First Congregational Church Service Flag

The first gold star was placed on the war service flag of the Congregational church Sunday morning in connection with the regular worship service. The impressive memorial observance was held by the pastor and congregation for Capt. Lawrence Meade, who was reported to have died in a Japanese prison camp on the Philippine Islands.

Captain Meade, son of Dr. C. L. Meade, is the first one of the war service roll, numbering 70 for the local church, to have lost his life in the present war.

While the congregation stood in solemn resignation, Mrs. Raymond Meyer, chairman of the service committee of the Women's Guild, placed the gold star on the large service flag following a brief statement of explanation by the pastor.

"Some would say we must resign ourselves to the will of God as our brave young men are giving their lives on the altar of war," said the Rev. Roy C. Helfenstein, pastor, "but it is impossible for some of us to feel that way about it.
"It was not God's will that Lawrence Meade should have lost his life in war. It is not God’s will that there should ever be any occasion for war. It is not God's will that any of the fine young men of our nation or of any nations should lose their lives in war. It is God's will that they should live. He is the God of life and not a God of death.

"It is more in keeping with fact for us to say, as we place the first gold star on our service flag, that we must resign ourselves to the fate of war instead of saying that we must resign ourselves to the will of God.

"The only thing that makes life worth living is the fact that there are some things worth dying for. A nation's honor is one of those things. So in resignation to the fate of war we place the first gold star on our service flag."

Source: The Globe Gazette, Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa, Monday, June 28, 1943, Page 5

NOTE: Dr. Chester L. Meade married Mabel McQuatters in 1924. He was a dentist in Mason City. ~ Globe-Gazette, October 03, 1934, Page 21

35 Cerro Gordo Men Killed in Action in 2 ½ Years of War

Memorial Day this year marks almost 2 ½ years since the United States entered World War II.  Of the more than 11 million men serving with the U.S. armed forces at home and overseas, it is estimated that Cerro Gordo county has contributed 4,100 men.

Died in prison camp:
Capt. Lawrence Meade, prisoner of Japs, June 22, 1943.

Source: Mason City Globe-Gazette, May 30, 1944