Woodbury County

T/Sgt. William Carl Knaack Jr.

 

 

Correctionville, Ia.—Mr. and Mrs. William Knaack, sr., received a telegram from the War Department that their son, T. Sgt. William Knaack, jr., of the Sixth division of the 20th infantry in the Philippines, was killed in action on Luzon January 29. They had previously been notified that he had been seriously wounded on January 18.

He entered the Army February 3, 1941, and received his training at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., Fort Warren, Wyo., Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., and Camp San Luis Obispo, Cal., leaving from the latter for overseas in the early fall of 1943. He was stationed at Hawaii, New Guinea and the Philippines. 

Sgt. Knaack was born June 2, 1916, at Correctionville and was graduated from Correctionville high school. He then engaged in farming with his father from that time until he entered the Army. He is survived by his stepmother, father, three sisters and two brothers. One of the brothers, Sgt. Luverne Knaack, is now serving in the signal corps somewhere in France.

Source: The Sioux City Journal, unknown date of publication (photo included)

MEMORIAL SERVICES FOR CORRECTIONVILLE SERGEANT ON SUNDAY

Correctionville, Ia.—Special:  Memorial services will be held at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at the Salem Lutheran Church at Rock Branch for T. Sgt. William Carl Knaack, jr., of Correctionville who was wounded in action on Luzon island January 18 and died January 29.  Rev. S. J. Meyer, former pastor and now of Strawberry Point, Ia., will officiate.  The American Legion will have charge of the service.

Sgt. Knaack was the son of William Knaack, a farmer here for many years.  Sgt. Knaack was born June 2, 1915, and grew to manhood on the home farm.  He entered service February 3, 1941.

Surviving are the father and stepmother; three sisters, Mrs. Elmer Timmerman of Holstein and Mrs. Adolph Herbolt and Miss Dorothy Knaack of Correctionville; two brothers, Henry of Correctionville and Sgt. Luverne in France, and his grandmother, Mrs. Henry Bauer of Pierson.

Source:  The Sioux City Journal, April 5, 1945