Woodbury County

Lt. John K. (“Jack”) Irvine

 

LT. J. K. IRVINE MISSING, REPORT  
Aunt, Uncle Informed Sioux Cityan Took Part in Belgium Battle

Lt. John K. (“Jack”) Irvine was reported missing in action December 19 in Belgium according to a telegram received from the War Department by his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph A. Gaynor, 2900 Jones street.  He was a member of the 90th Cavalry Reconnaissance squadron of the 10th Armored division under Gen. Patton.

Lt. Irvine, formerly employed by Gaynor-Bagstad Co., entered the Army in March, 1942.  He was stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga., for nearly a year before going overseas last September. He attended the University of South Dakota and was graduated from Central high school.

Source: The Sioux City Journal, January 16, 1945 (photo included)

“JACK” IRVINE IS WAR VICTIM
Sioux City Lieutenant Killed in Belgium

Hope that Lt. John K. (“Jack”) Irvine, already officially reported missing in action, might still be alive, were dispelled Wednesday by a telegram from the office of the United States adjutant general in Washington, to Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Gaynor, 2900 Jones street, stating definitely that Lt. Irvine had been killed in action in Belgium December 19.

Young Irvine was a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Irvine.  His father was secretary of the Knapp and Spencer Hardware company; his mother (Elsie Gordon), a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Gordon.  After the death of both parents, Jack grew up in the Gordon home and later in the Gaynor home, Mrs. Gaynor being his aunt. Before joining the Army in 1942, he was a traveling salesman for the Gaynor-Bagstad Co.

Lt. Irvine was stationed at Camp Gordon a year before going overseas last September.  His last visit home was just previous to his being sent across.  He belonged to the 90th Cavalry reconnaissance squadron of the 10th armored division under Gen. Patton.

He was a Central high school graduate and attended the University of South Dakota.

Survivors include an only sister, Betty (Mrs. Ben Bullock) at Manchester, Mass.

Source: The Sioux City Journal, January 31, 1945