Adams County

S/Sgt. Virgil W. Goodvin

 

News About Adams County
Men and Women in the Service

Sgt. Virgil W. Goodvin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Goodvin, writes from Hawaii that he has recently received an addition stripe on his sleeve, and is now a Staff Sergeant.

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, January 13, 1944, Page 1

 Mail To Virgil Goodvin Marked “Deceased”

The uncertainty concerning the status of S. Sgt. Virgil W. Goodvin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Goodvin of Corning, was further intensified this week when there were returned to his parents two letters which they had written to him on January 3 and January 15. The company commander had marked “Deceased” on the face of the enveloped. However, since the letters did not reach the hospital where Virgil was presumably cared for, there is still the possibility the information at his company headquarters could be wrong.

 February 22 [?] the War Department notified Mr. and Mrs. Goodvin that Virgil had been seriously wounded in the fighting on Luzon January 25, 1945, and no other direct word has since been received by the Goodvins. The long period of anxiety has been very trying for Mr. and Mrs. Goodvin and it is hoped more favorable news will be received, although the circumstances do not appear encouraging. Every effort has been made through the Red Cross and other channels to secure further information about Virgil, but so far the efforts have been without results. Army records at Washington, checked by persons in authority, give no indication that Virgil is deceased.

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, May 17, 1945, Page 1

Report Virgil Goodvin
Died On January 25th

After many weeks of anxious waiting for some definite word from their son, Sgt. Virgil Goodvin, reported seriously wounded in action on Luzon January 25, 1945, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Goodvin of Corning, were further saddened last Friday, when a telegram from the War Department informed them that Virgil died January 25, the same date as he was listed as wounded. But there seems to still remain an unusual circumstance in connection with the case.

A letter written by Sgt. Ernest Cross to Bud Staples in Corning and dated at Luzon April 15, stated that a member of his outfit had been to the hospital where Virgil was being cared for and that he (Virgil) was making recovery. However, other indications point to the belief that the War Department announcement is correct. Letters written to Virgil have been returned marked “deceased.”

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, May 24, 1945, Page 2

Goodvin Died On Luzon

Awarded Bronze Star For Bravery

Further official information on the death of Sgt. Virgil Goodvin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Goodvin of Corning, has been received and corroborates the information telling of his death from wounds on Luzon January 25, 1945. After receiving official notice that Virgil had been wounded, his parents had no further word for a period of over three months, although every effort was made to trace rumors that he had died and other rumors that he was recovering. Official notice of his death was not received until last week.

Memorial services for Sgt. Goodvin will be held at the Baptist church in Corning next Sunday, June 3 at 2 p. m. The service will be in charge of the Pastor, Rev. A. R. Staley and the American Legion.

Last week Mr. and Mrs. Goodvin received a very comforting letter from Lt. Curtis E. Johnsey, commanding Co. “H” of the First Infantry on Luzon. The letter, dated February 13, 1945, reads as follows:

“Prior to the arrival of this letter you will, no doubt, have been notified by the War Department of the death of your beloved son. I fully realize that mere words cannot compensate for the great loss you have sustained, yet I hope you will not deem this an intrusion on your bereavement.

“In the action in which your son so bravely met his death, he was attached to Co. “I” s a forward observer for his mortar section, and was engaged in adjusting fire on strongly fortified enemy positions in the Cabaruan Hills sector. Virgil was wounded by shell fragments from an enemy artillery barrage, and was immediately evacuated to a hospital. The best of medical attention proved to be of no avail, and he passed away the same day, January 25th, 1945.

“Virgil was one of the outstanding soldiers of our company. His excellent judgment and his coolness and bravery under the most difficult combat conditions had won him the most profound respect of his Officers and fellow soldiers. His loss is a very personal one to all members of this company, and we wish to tender you our deepest and most heartfelt sympathy.

“Virgil’s last rites were solemnized by our Chaplain with full military honors in the service of his religious faith. He lies buried in the United States Armed Forces Cemetery No. 1, at Binalonon, Luzon, Philippine Islands.”

The Free Press has received a brief news release from the Public Relations of the Sixth Infantry Division, which states Sgt. Goodvin was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal. The news release is as follows:

With Sixth Infantry Division On Luzon

Staff Sergeant Virgil W. Goodvin of Corning, Iowa, has been awarded the Bronze Star Medal posthumously by the commanding general of the Sixth Infantry Division for “heroic achievement in connection with military operations against the Japanese” near Minten, Luzon on January 13.

According to the citation, Goodvin, who was acting as forward mortar observer, coolly and effectively adjusted his mortars on enemy positions while his company was pinned to the ground by intense machine gun and 37mm fire. His cool thinking and display of courage while under intense enemy fire undoubtedly save the lives of many men and permitted his company to maneuver to a position from which its mission was accomplished.

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, May 31, 1945, Page 6

Obituaries

S.SGT. VIRGIL W. GOODVIN

An impressive Memorial Service was held at the Corning Baptist Church last Sunday afternoon at 2 p. m., honoring the memory of S. Sgt. Virgil W. Goodvin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Goodvin of Corning. Sgt. Goodvin was killed on Luzon January 25, 2945, while acting as an advance lookout for an artillery unit. He has been awarded the Purple Heart and Bronze Star, the former for wounds and the latter for courage and bravery. Kenneth Routh, Don Routh and Albert Mack composed the male trio which furnished music for the Memorial Sunday, with Mrs. Don Routh accompanying at the piano. Rev. A. R. Staley and the American Legion had charge of the Memorial program.

Staff Sergeant Virgil W. Goodvin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry D. Goodvin, was born in Lincoln Township, Adams County, Iowa on April 19, 1921 and died in the Philippine Islands on Jan. 25, 1945 as a result of wounds received on that date. Age 23, years, 9 months and 6 days.

Virgil volunteered in the service of his country on Feb. 3, 1941. After much training in different camps in this country he spent about a year an a half in active duty over seas; at Pearl Harbor, New Guinea and in the Philippines.

According to word received by his parents from Rev. Paul F. Sharp, the Chaplain of Virgil’s regiment, he was given the fullest military funeral possible and was buried in a beautiful little cemetery in the Philippines which will always be neatly cared for. He lies with others who paid the supreme price.

Chaplain Sharp also writes, “May you find comfort in the assurance of Life beyond this life and in the knowing that nothing, not even death can remove God’s children from His Eternal Love.”

In addition to his father and mother, Virgil leaves to mourn his going, three brothers who are also engaged in over seas duty, Tech. Sgt. Vernon R. Goodvin in Italy; Pfc. Harry D. Goodvin in Germany; Sgt. Elvin J. Goodvin in the Philippines; also many other relatives and a host of friends.

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, June 07, 1945, Page 8

Return Soldier Dead From Battle Fields

The body of Staff Sergeant Virgil W. Goodvin was due to arrive in San Francisco this week and will later be returned to Corning for burial. Virgil is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Goodvin and was killed on the Pacific theatre of war.

[NOTE: Portions of this article regarding MM 1/C Edgar LeRoy Coons and CM Lawrence Ivan Weckman have been omitted but appear on their individual webpages within this site.]

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, July 01, 1948, Page 1

Sgt. Goodvin Service
Friday Afternoon At 2

The body of Sgt. Virgil Goodvin, who died January 25, 1945, from wounds received in the fighting on the island of Luzon, arrived in Corning Wednesday. Funeral services will be held from the Baptist church in Corning, Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Burial will be in the Quincy cemetery.

Virgil is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Goodvin of Corning and joined the armed forces February 3, 1941.

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, August 26, 1948, Page 1

Obituaries

S. SGT. VIRGIL W. GOODVIN

S. Sgt. Virgil W. Goodvin was killed on Luzon January 25, 1945, while acting as an advance lookout for an Artillery unit. He has been awarded the Purple Heart and Bronze Star, the former for wounds and the latter for courage and bravery.

Staff Sergeant Virgil W. Goodvin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry D. Goodvin, was born in Lincoln Township, Adams County, Iowa on April 19, 1921 and died in the Philippine Islands on Jan. 25, 1945 as a result of wounds received on that date. Age 23, years, 9 months and 6 days.

Virgil volunteered in the service of his country on Feb. 3, 1941. After much training in different camps in this country he spent about a year an a half in active duty over seas; at Pearl Harbor, New Guinea and in the Philippines.

Virgil leaves to mourn his going, his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Goodvin, three brothers: Vernon and Donald of Corning and Elvin Dutch of Cedar Falls; also many other relatives and a host of friends.

Peaceful be thy sleep, dear Virgil,
It is sweet to breathe thy name:
In life we loved you dearly,
In death we do the same.
Oft we think of you, dear Virgil,
And our hearts are sad with pain,
Oh, this would be a Heaven
Could we hear your voice again.
You are gone but not forgotten,
Never shall your memory fade,
Sweetest thoughts shall ever linger
God grant some day we’ll meet again.
He died as brave men have a chance to die.
Fighting to save a world’s morality.
He died the noblest death that man might die,
Fighting for God, and right, and liberty
Just when his days seemed brightest.
Just when his hopes seemed best.
God called him from amongst us
To his eternal rest.
Sadly missed, but God knows best.

Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock, August 27, from the Baptist church in Corning. Rev. Stuart C. Davis was in charge. Interment was in Quincy cemetery. Music was by Warren Routh, Don Routh and Albert Mack, with Mrs. Velma Routh, pianist. Pall bearers were Dale Gaskill, Harold Rundlett, Clinton Cooper, Harry McMorran, Charlie Lawrence, Wm. H. Harringer.

Among those from a distance attending the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. John M. Kunath and son Lyle, and Frank Kunath, all of LeMars, Iowa; Harold and Rex Goodvin of Maryville, Mo.; Mr. and Mrs. Forrest Cochran and family of Scottsbluff, Nebraska.

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, September 02, 1948, Page 14