Ringgold County

Charles Francis Foster

 

Foster, Ambulance Driver,
Reported "Missing in Action"

Charles Francis Foster, one of Uncle Sam's ambulance drivers in the African war area, has been reported missing in action since February 17. That information was conveyed in a telegram received Saturday morning by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh A. [Lena (Walters)] Foster, of Mount Ayr.

The last letter received by Mr. and Mrs. Foster was dated January 26.

Charles entered the service of his country April 22, 1941, and received his basic training at Camp Claiborne, La. He had been stationed in Northern Ireland from March 2, 1942, until he and others of the invasion force left for Africa where they landed the eighth day of November.

Charles is the sixth member of the armed forces from Ringgold county reported missing in action. Other are J. F. Athey, Milo Robison, Ernest Sherman Livesay, John N. Morris, Jr., and Vernon Kaster.

Source: Mount Ayr Record News, Mount Ayr, Ringgold County, Iowa, February, 1943
Submission by Theola Weeda collection

Foster, Prisoner of War for Two Years, Released

The hearts of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Foster were gladdened Monday when they received a V-mail letter from their son, Pfc. Charles F. Foster, who for over two years had been a prisoner of war. It was the first word they had received from their son since December, 1944.

The letter, dated May 15 and written from somewhere in France, reads as follows:

"Dear Folks, Believe it or not, I am on my way home. We were liberated last month by the Russians before the war was over. If everything goes right I should be home within the next six months or so for a 60-day furlough. There is no reason to worry about me now. I am in the very best of health and living good now. Army chow sure does good and I am gaining weight again. There is no need of writing to me for we have no address. This is the last time I'll write until I hit the U. S. A., and then I'll send you a telegram. Tell everyone 'Hello' and I'll see you soon."

Charles entered service April 23, 1941. He was stationed in North Ireland from March 2, 1942, until he and others of the invasion force left for Africa where they landed November 8. He was reported missing in action February 17, 1943, at the time he was serving as one of Uncle Sam's ambulance drivers in the African war area.

Mr. and Mrs. Foster were notified in May, 1943, that Charles was being held as an Italian prisoner of war. They later received notification that he had been transferred to the German prison camp, Stalag 3B, where he was imprisoned until liberated in April.

Source: Mount Ayr Record News, Mount Ayr, Ringgold County, Iowa, February, 1943 (photo included)


NOTE: Stalag 3B, located at Furstenberg, Germany, was liberated in April of 1945. Charles Foster arrived back in Mount Ayr in June of 1945. On September 3, 1945, Charles and Cleone Rummage were married.