Plymouth County

Pvt. Robert F. Crowe

 

PVT. R. CROWE IS WOUNDED
War Dept. Informs Parents Son Was Injured Sept. 26

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Crowe were informed yesterday by the War Department that their son, Pvt. Robert Francis Crowe, was slightly wounded while fighting in France on September 26.
The Crowes formerly lived in Stanton township and moved to LeMars a short time ago. They make their home at the extreme south end of Central Avenue and Mr. and Mrs. Crowe are both employed by Wind-King Company at Merrill.

Source: LeMars Globe-Post, October 12, 1944



WOUNDS FATAL TO R. F. CROWE
LeMars Private Hit During Action in France

LeMars, Ia.—Special: Pvt. Robert F. Crowe, 23, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Crowe, died of wounds received in action in France on September 26, 1944, according to word received by his parents from the War Department.

He was in the infantry and had been in service for two years and overseas since February, 1944. He had been in France nearly a month. His last letter to his parents was written in September. On October 11, a telegram informed them that he had been slightly wounded. Then they received no word until the telegram received January 16.

He attended St. Joseph’s school in LeMars and public school at Merrill. Before entering service he was employed by the Clark Construction company at Merrill. He is survived by his parents.

Source: The Sioux City Journal, January 17, 1945 (photo included)



WAR DEPARTMENT FORGOT TO INFORM PARENTS OF PRIVATE BOB CROWE’S DEATH IN ACTION Been Reported “Slight-Wounded” In France, Sept. 26

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Crowe, living in Wernli addition, received a telegram Tuesday from the War Department which states:
It is with deep distress that we must inform you a report has now been received, which states that your son, Pvt. Robert F. Crowe, died Sept. 26 in France as the result of wounds received in action. The Secretary of War asks that I express my deep sympathies to you in your terrible loss, which has been made doubly hard to bear through unavoidable delay in reporting it from the theater of operations. Permit me to add my own personal expression of condolence. Concluding letter follows immediately. ~Dunlap, acting the Adjutant General

This telegram came as the climax to a period of great uneasiness which began October 11, received a telegram stated:
Regret to inform you your son Pvt. Robert F. Crowe was slightly wounded in action Sept. 26 in France. You will be advised when reports of condition are received. ~J. A. Ulio, the Adjutant General

The confusion in the War Department evidently caused the report of Pvt. Crowe’s death to have been overlooked, and the telegram stated that he was slightly wounded was put out instead. As a result, the primary letter, which would have been sent out a few days later, which would have corrected the error, was never sent.

The last letter received from Pvt. Crowe was dated Sept. 19, and in this he wrote to his parents:
Dear Folks: Will drop a few lines to let you know that I am getting along o. k. I guess it has been some time since I got to write. I have had a heck of a time trying to keep up with my address. The one I have now I know will be changed again one of these days. But I am used to that now. The last time I got a letter from you was July 7, so it has been a long time no mail.

HOPED FOR QUIET.
I saw Stub just before I left England. (This was Merton Jessen, of Merrill. They were drafted for the war at the same time, and left together.) It sure seemed good to see some one a fellow knows. Stub and I will probably end up in Berlin the next time we meet—but I hope in Merrill, and soon. Some place where it is rather quiet. [end of letter quote]
Pvt. Crow was in a replacement pool as he wrote that letter, and must have been sent to the front lines very shortly afterward.

Pvt. Crowe was born at Merrill, Aug. 1, 1921, one of twins. The other twin died at the age of 9 days, and Robert was the only child Mr. & Mrs. Crowe had.

He attended elementary school at St. Joseph’s in LeMars, and later attended school at Merrill. He was employed by the Clarke Construction Co., at the time he was drafted. He also had worked at the Sioux City air base, at the bomber base at Ft. Meade, Neb., and on government jobs in Texas.
The War Department’s reply acknowledging an error had been made in reporting Pvt. Crowe killed came after Mr. Crowe had written and asked for some word of his son. Mr. and Mrs. Crowe had been expecting to hear from him daily, as they presumed he was recovering in a hospital from his “slight wounds.” When no letter came, they began to worry, and the government eventually confirmed their worst fears.

Source: LeMars Globe-Post, January 18, 1945



PARENTS NOTIFIED OF DEATH OF SON, ROBERT F. CROWE Killed During Action In France, September 21

Pvt. Robert F. Crowe, 23, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Crowe, died of wounds received in action in France on September 26, 1944, according to word received by his parents from the War Department on Tuesday.

He was in the infantry and had been in service for two years. He received his training at Camp Cooke, Calif., a camp in Tennessee, Pine Camp, New York, and in Pennsylvania. He was home on his last furlough in December, 1943. He went overseas in February, 1944, and had been in France about a month. His last letter to his parents was written in September.

Mr. and Mrs. Crowe received a telegram from the War Department October 11 informing them that their son had been slightly wounded on September 26. They received no word until the telegram Tuesday, January 16. The telegram read as follows: “It is with deep distress, I must inform you a report has just been received which states your son, Private Robert F. Crowe, died September 26, in France as a result of wounds received in action. The Secretary of War asks that I express his deep sympathy to you in your terrible loss, which has been made doubly hard to bear through unavoidable delay in reporting it from the theatre of operations. Permit me to add my own personal expression of condolence. Confirming letter follows immediately.” ~Signed, Dunlap, Acting Adjutant General.

Robert Crowe attended public school at Merrill and St. Joseph’s school in LeMars. The Crowe family lived on a farm near Merrill and moved to LeMars about a year ago. Before entering the service, Robert was employed by the Clark Construction company at Merrill. He is survived by his parents.

Plans are being made for a memorial service to be held in Merrill next week.

Source: LeMars Sentinel, January 19, 1945

Memorial Rites at Merrill Today for Pvt. R. Crowe

Merrill, Ia.—Special:  Memorial services were conducted Saturday morning at 9:30 o’clock in the Catholic church in Merrill for Pvt. Robert Crowe, who died in France September 26, as the result of wounds received in action.  Rev. Zeno Reising officiated.  The American Legion had charge of the services.

Pvt. Crowe is the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Crowe and was slightly wounded, according to a telegram sent the parents last October.  Last Tuesday they received another wire announcing his death.

Source: The Sioux City Journal, January 27, 1945


MEMORIAL SERVICES FOR ROBERT CROWE HELD AT MERRILL CHURCH LAST SATURDAY
Died From Wounds Received In Action In France

Memorial services were held at the Church of the Assumption, Merrill on Saturday morning for Pvt. Robert Crowe, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Crowe of LeMars. Rey. Zeno Reising read the mass and the church choir furnished the music.

Pvt. Crowe died of wounds received in action, September 26, 1944, but his parents were not notified of his death until January 16.

Members of the American Legion Olson and Halweg Post, No. 125, of Merrill, conducted the military services. Dr. W. A. Aitken is the chaplain of the post and the honorary pallbearers were Caspar Brunstadt, Chester Woodley, Oliver Albright, Floyd Funk, Jack Petersen and John Taylor. Oliver Albright and Jack N. Petersen folded the flag and presented it to Mrs. Crowe.

Out of town relatives who attended the memorial services were Mr. and Mrs. John Fox of Colman, S. D.; Mr. and Mrs. George Fox of Wayne, Neb.; Mr. and Mrs. Ray Crowe and Mrs. Hodgen of Jackson, Neb., and Mrs. John Kramer of South Sioux City.

Source: LeMars Semi-Weekly Sentinel, February 2, 1945