Cerro Gordo County

Lt. Lyle W. Crook

 

 

 

WITH GLIDER INFANTRY

Lyle W. Crook, 1st lieutenant, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Crook, 620 Harrison ave., N. W., is now stationed at Fort Bragg, N. Car., with the glider infantry. Lieutenant Crook was one of the national guardsmen from the area who entrained for Camp Claiborne, La., early in 1941. He had been employed at the Jacob E. Decker and Sons packing plant.

Source: The Globe-Gazette, Mason City, Iowa, Wednesday, October 13, 1943, Page 10 (photo included)

Missing in Action

First Lt. Lyle Crook, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Crook, 620 Harrison, N. W., has been missing in action since Aug. 28, according to a telegram received here Tuesday.

Lt. Crook was named in an Associated Press story sent from the American forces on the southern France Beachhead on Aug. 15, as a member of a troop of Americans who took part in the invasion of southern France and in a short time had penetrated 3 miles inland with little opposition. He left Mason City with the national guard in 1941. He is a former Decker employe (sic).

Source: The Globe-Gazette, Mason City, Iowa, Monday, September 21, 1944, Page 7

Lt. Crook Killed in Action
Previously Reported Missing

Lost Life on August 28 Presumably
in France in Southern Invasion

First Lt. Lyle W. Crook, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Crook, 620 Harrison, N. W., who was previously reported missing in action on Aug. 28, was killed in action on that date, according to a telegram received by his parents.

No particulars as to his death have been received but it was known that he took part in the invasion of southern France. At that time, Aug. 15, an Associated Press story received here told of his being a member of a troop that had penetrated inland in France with little opposition. He was with the glider infantry.

Lt. Crook’s wife and baby daughter live with her parents in Louisiana. A daughter, Carol Jean, lives in Mason City.

Lt. Crook left Mason City with the national guard in 1941. As a civilian he worked at Decker’s.

Source: The Globe-Gazette, Mason City, Iowa, Monday, October 02, 1944, Page 13

Lt. Crook Memorial Services
at Grace Evangelical Sunday

Was Killed in Action in
European Theater on Last August 28

Memorial services for First Lt. Lyle W. Crook will be held at the Grace Evangelical church Sunday morning in connection with the morning service worship at 11 o’clock, with the Rev. G. H. Bamford in charge. The gold star for Lt. Crook will be the 6th added to the service flag of the church, which now bears the names of 78 men and 2 women.

Lt. Crook was killed in action in the European theater of operations on Aug. 28. He was with the glider infantry and though no particulars as to his death have been received, it was known that he took part in the invasion of southern France. Before entering service with the national guard in 1941, Lt. Crook was employed at Decker’s.

Lt. Crook is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Crook, 620 Harrison N. W.; his wife and baby daughter, who live with her parents in Louisiana, and another daughter in Mason City; also 2 sisters, Mrs. Florence Peterson, 628 Van Buren, and Ilene at home. A brother, Harold, also lives at home.

Source: The Globe-Gazette, Mason City, Iowa, Friday, December 01, 1944, Page 13

Honor Memory of Lt. Crook

Pastor Speaks on Triumphant Fait

Memorial service for Lt. Lyle W. Crook was held in connection with the morning service of worship at Grace Evangelical church on Sunday morning. The gold star was placed over the blue on the service flag of the church by Mrs. O. E. Moon. The church choir sang “Beyond The Sunset” by Brock.

The Rev. G. H. Bamford, pastor of the church, speaking on “A Triumphant Faith,” said, “It has been true in every generation that great souls have not been exempt from life’s problems, difficulties and disappointments, nor even from what has been considered as life’s tragedies. Their greatness of soul has been evidenced by the fact that they have not acknowledged defeat in the face of any opposing circumstance, but have gone on to live triumphantly.

“Faith is the hand which we lift up to God that we may receive thereby the spiritual blessing He is always seeking to bestow upon us. Faith is certain that the purposes of God cannot be defeated by any hostile circumstances, even though the purposes of men may fail. And so the faith that is triumphant does not base its hope primarily on men, the purposes of men, nor on human resources, but on God and His eternal, unchanging purposes of good will toward all mankind. . . .And we are sure that eventually this spirit shall prevail over all opposing forces.

“As today we pay our tribute to one who gave his all, even life itself, to a cause in which he believed, in what spirit shall we face the future? If this and other sacrifices like it are in any measure to be justified, it must be that we unitedly purpose that she shall do all we can to establish a relationship among men and nations that shall make possible the speedy realization of this unchanging purpose of God for ‘peace on earth, goodwill to men.’”

Source: The Globe-Gazette, Mason City, Iowa, Monday, December 04, 1944, Page 11

Awarded Silver Star Posthumously

The silver star has been awarded posthumously to First Lt. Lyle Crook, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Crook, 620 Harrison, N. W., who was killed in action last August 28 in France.

“For gallantry in action on Aug. 28, 1944, in France,” read the citation received here. “Lt. Crook ordered to clean out a town of enemy troops, led his company to the north edge of the village, where he and his men encountered heavy enemy artillery, mortar and machine gun fire.

“When he had halted the advance and directed his men to the most advantageous positions, he determined to contact the company on his left flank in order to co-ordinate his future movement. Rather than ask one of his men to undertake the hazardous mission, he made the trip himself, moving over open ground covered y direct machine gun and sniper fire.

“When he reached a point only a few yards from the company, he was killed by fire from an enemy sniper. Although he did not reach his objective, his movement was observed and his company’s position located, thereby facilitating co-ordination between the 2 units. His gallant action reflects great credit upon himself and the armed forces of the United States.”

The decoration will be forwarded to the commanding general, who will select an officer to make the presentation. Lt. Crook had also been awarded the purple heart.

Source: The Globe-Gazette, Mason City, Iowa, Tuesday, February 05, 1945, Page 14