Muscatine County

Pfc. Clarence Criger

 

IN TEXAS CAMP
Pfc. Clarence Criger who left for the Army in December, has the present address: Co. K., Barracks 147, Mormoyle Ordnance Department, San Antonio, Tes. He is the son of Mrs. Mary Criger, 305 Liberty street.

Source: Muscatine Journal and News-Tribune, March 15, 1943 (photo included)

IN ENGLAND—Mrs. Mary Criger, 305 Liberty street, has just received a letter from her son, PFC Clarence Criger, who is located somewhere in England. He is attached to an engineering unit.

Source: Muscatine Journal and News-Tribune, June 26, 1943

Pfc. C. Criger Missing War Message Says

Pfc. Clarence Criger, 37, of Muscatine has been missing in action in Belgium since Dec. 18, according to information from the War Department received by his mother, Mrs. Mary Criger, 305 Liberty street.

Pfc. Criger entered service Dec. 18, 1942, and served at several camps before going overseas in May 1944. Prior to entering service he had been employed by the Roach and Musser Co. He was stationed in England for a time after going overseas.

A letter written Nov. 6 was the last word from Pfc. Criger.

Source: Muscatine Journal and News-Tribune, January 8, 1945 (photo included)

LETTER REVEALS PFC. ROBERT MUSSER AND PFC. CLARENCE CRIGER LIBERATED

Word of the release of these two men, the first from Muscatine to be liberated in the Allied drive through Germany, came from Major John Trygg, of McGregor, Ia., stationed at headquarters of the Seventh Army in charge of prisoners liberated by the Army.

RECEIVED MESSAGES.

Pfc. Criger, whose mother, Mrs. Mary Criger, resides at 305 Liberty street, was reported missing in action in Belgium on Dec. 18 and on March 6, his mother learned that he had been taken a prisoner. Two messages, a letter of Jan. 6 and a card dated Feb. 6, have been received by Mrs. Criger from her son since he was captured by the Germans.

Pfc. Criger has been in service since Dec. 18, 1942, and went overseas in May of 1943.

Source: Muscatine Journal and News-Tribune, Friday, April 13, 1945 (photo included)

Letters Come From 2 Liberated From Nazi Camp

Pfc. Robert Musser and Pfc. Clarence Criger were liberated by the Seventh Army from a prisoner of war camp in Germany early Monday morning, April 2, according to letters written by them and received by relatives here this week.

Earlier announcement of their liberation was received in a message sent by Major John Trygg stationed at headquarters of the Seventh Army in charge of prisoners liberated by the Army.

The letter from Pfc. Criger was written to his mother, Mrs. Mary Criger, 305 Liberty street.

Both men were reported missing in action and a later message stated that Pfc. Criger was a prisoner of war. News that Pfc Musser was taken prisoner was not received until it was learned that he had been liberated.

Source: Muscatine Journal and News-Tribune, April 21, 1945

Pfc. Clarence Criger, son of Mrs. Mary Criger, 305 Liberty street, held at Stalag 9B and liberated at the same time as Pfc. Robert Musser, arrived in Muscatine last week.

Source: Muscatine Journal and News-Tribune, May 10, 1945

WAR END NEWS PROVIDES HAPPINESS FOR FAMILIES OF NAZI WAR PRISONERS

News of victory in Europe had special significance in many Muscatine home where relatives have “sweated it through” for months and, in some cases, years with their husbands, sons and brothers who were being held in prisoner of war camps in Germany.

Others Are Home;

Pfc. Clarence Criger returned to his home at 506 Liberty street on May 2, after 105 days in a German prison camp prior to his liberation by the U. S. Seventh Army on April 2.

Source: Muscatine Journal and News-Tribune, Monday, May 7, 1945