Woodbury County

Cpl. Ronald F. Carey

Born 02 Dec 1913
Died 08 Apr 1943

Plymouth County

 

SIOUX CITYAN DIES IN ACTION
Corporal Ronald Carey, Formerly of LeMars, Killed in Africa

Corporal Technician Ronald F. Carey, son of Mrs. Mary A. Carey, 416 16th Street, was killed in action in the North African area April 8, [1943] according to word received from the war department in Washington by his mother.

Corporal Carey was born December 2, 1913, at Marcus, Ia., and attended the Marcus parochial school. In 1925 the family moved to LeMars where he graduated from St. Joseph’s high school. After graduation, he moved to Sioux City and was employed by the Gifford Oil Company and the Powers Collection Service. He enlisted in the army in February 1941.

Corporal Carey is survived by his mother; a brother, Wilfred J., San Antonio, Tex.; three sisters, Mrs. Edith Meinen and Bernice McCarville, both of Sioux City, and Sister De Chantal of New Orleans, La.

Source: very likely The Sioux City Journal

RONALD F. CAREY, LE MARS YOUTH, DIES IN ACTION
Killed While Fighting On Battle Field In Tunisia

Relatives in LeMars were notified Friday of the death of Ronald Carey, well known LeMars young man, who fell in battle, fighting for this country, April 8 [1943], in North Africa. The news came to LeMars to Mr. and Mrs. John Schneider, 234 First Avenue SE, and was conveyed by his mother, Mrs. Mary Carey, now living in Sioux City. Mrs. Schneider is the mother of Mary Carey.

Corporal Technician Ronald F. Carey, son of Mrs. Mary A. Carey, 416 16th Street, was killed in action in the North African area April 8, [1943] according to word received from the war department in Washington by his mother.

Ronald Carey was a member of Company K at the outbreak of the war and was among the first to go on service in foreign lands. He was stationed with the American troops in Ireland and England before going to Africa.

Ronald Carey was born December 2, 1913, at Marcus, Ia., and attended the Marcus parochial school. In 1925 the family moved to LeMars where he graduated from St. Joseph’s high school.

While still a school boy he worked in the Beachler store for several years. Later he engaged in the oil business and conducted the D-X Station on Plymouth street.
At the time of his entrance into the service he was in the employ of the Powers Collection service.

Corporal Carey is survived by his mother; a brother, Wilfred J., San Antonio, Tex.; three sisters, Mrs. Edith Meinen and Bernice McCarville, both of Sioux City, and Sister De Chantal of New Orleans, La.

Only last week a letter was received in LeMars from Corporal Carey which he wrote glowingly of his experiences and of being among old comrades, saying “the old gang are now on Tunisian battle front and LeMars can well be proud of this gang. I am in Staff Sergeant Burns’ platoon.”

Source: LeMars Sentinel, April 27, 1943

Posthumous Award of Purple Heart to Soldier’s Mother  

Mrs. Mary A. Carey, 416 14th street, has received the Purple Heart medal, awarded posthumously to her son, Corporal Technician Ronald F. Carey, who died April 8, of wounds suffered in the north Africa area.

The medal was accompanied by a certificate stating that Corporal Carey was wounded in action early in April and that he died in a hospital.  Corporal Carey was a graduate of St. Joseph’s high school, LeMars.  He was employed here by the Gifford Oil company and the Powers collection service.  He enlisted in the Army in February, 1941.  He was 29 years old.

Source:  The Sioux City Journal, June 16, 1943 (photograph included)

Ray McNamara of K. Company Tells of Hot Fights
Wounded in No. Africa
Were Within 25 Feet Of Ronald Carey When He Was Killed

Ray M. McNamara, of Kingsley, home on a furlough with his mother, Sarah McNamara is the first of men from this vicinity involved in the North African campaign to return home. He was guest of honor at an open-house party given at Kingsley by his friends, and was interviewed Tuesday by a Globe-Post reporter.

Pvt. McNamara was about 25 feet from Corporal Ronald Carey when the latter was killed, early in the Tunisian fighting. Although Carey was a little fellow, he was one of the coolest and best thinking under that the company had.

“Roddy Steers (of Kingsley) and I were about 25 feet from Corporal Carey when he was killed by a mortar shell.”

“Corporal Carey was in charge of a walkie-talkie outfit (portable radio.) Roddy and I were talking to him, when mortar shells started to land near us, and we decided to spread out and drop down. Corporal Carey, of course, was delayed by his radio equipment, and couldn’t get down so quick. He was knocked down by a shell fragment. But other men have been knocked out, and we didn’t think Ron was badly hurt. A MOMENT LATER, however, ANOTHER MORTAR SHELL LANDED RIGHT BESIDE HIM, and that did the business. He wasn’t badly messed up, but it was enough.”

Source: LeMars Globe-Post, Thursday, July 29, 1943 (photo of Ronald Carey included)

IOWA HONOR ROLL

These Iowans, like those pictured here on previous Sundays, have given their lives for their country. They are men who have died in actual combat or in prison camps. The fourth line under each name designates the theatre of war in which they were serving. Other pictures will be published later.

Source: The DesMoines Register, Sunday, February 13, 1944  (photo included)