Adams County

Pfc. Emil Eugene Bauer

Born 20 May 1924
Died 20 Dec 1944
 

 

LOCALS

Mrs. Fred Bauer, Jr., has word from her son, Gene, that his is located at Ft. Stil (sic). Mrs. Bauer spent the week in Des Moines prior to Gene’s departure, and was able to spend the evenings with him. While there she was a gust in the home of her niece, Mrs. Don Stillwell.

Service Slants
News About Adams County Men and Women in the Service

Pvt. Gene Bauer has enjoyed a furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bauer, at the same time his brother, S. Sgt. Fred Bauer was home from Fort Belvoir, Virginia. Fred returned to camp Monday, and Gene will leave Friday to report back to cargo at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo.

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, June 10, 1943, Page 4

SUNDAY GUESTS

Mr. and Mrs. Mart Miller had a dinner Sunday in honor of S. Sgt Fred L. Bauer Jr. who is stationed at Fort Belvoir, Va., and Pvt. Gene Bauer who is stationed at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. Those present besides the honored guests were: Mr. and Mrs. Fred. Bauer, Mrs. Cecil Coetin, Mr. and Mrs. August Bauer, and Mary Alice.

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, January 06, 1944, Page 4

Additional Locals

Pvt. Gene Bauer, recently on maneuvers out of Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri, is now stationed at Camp Breckenridge, Kentucky

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, April 13, 1944, Page 3

Service Slants
News About Adams County Men and Women in the Service

Pvt. Gene Bauer who is in the U. S. Army, located at Camp Breckinridge, Kentucky, has been promoted to Private First Class.

Service Slants
News About Adams County Men and Women in the Service

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bauer have received word from their son, Pfc. Gene Bauer, telling of his safe arrival in England.

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, May 11, 1944, Pages 3 & 5

COUNTY’S CASULATY LIST GROWS;
Pfc. Bauer, Lt. McElroy Killed

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FLASH!
Shortly before our press hour Wednesday, a telegram from the War Department, to Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Odell of Brooks, announced the death of their son, Cpl. Roy E. Odell, killed in action in Belgium, January 7, 1945.
THE TOLL
With the death of Cpl. Odell, the number of Adams County boys to give their lives in World War II, was raised to 29. In addition to the 29 killed, nine are missing in action and 12 are prisoners of war.
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[NOTE: Portions of this article regarding Cpl. Odell and Lt. McElroy have been omitted but appear on their individual webpages within this site.]

KILLED Dec. 20 ON WEST FRONT
Message Received Last Wednesday Evening

Sudden and heartbreaking news in the form of a message from the War Department to Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bauer, of Corning, ended the anxious weeks of waiting for word from their youngest son, Pfc. Gene Bauer. The message came Wednesday evening, January 17th, with the brief information that Gene had met death while in action, December 20th, in Belgium.

Pfc. Eugene Bauer was born May 20, 1924, in Corning, Iowa, the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bauer. He attended the Corning schools, and graduated with the class of 1942. After his graduation, he assisted his father in the garage, until he entered military training, May 18, 1943. He received his basic training in Field Artillery, at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and went overseas June, 1944. He was transferred to the Infantry, and after arriving in England, joined the paratroopers, receiving his “Wings and Boots,” on
October 28, 1944.

Killed December 20

The message which notified his parents of his death came Wednesday evening, January 17th, 1945, stating he was killed on December 20th, in Belgium, fighting with the 82nd Paratroop Infantry, In Belgium. Further details would follow by letter.

Gene’s sister, Mrs. Cecil Costin, had received a letter from him, written on December 16th, from which they concluded he was killed on his first trip to the front lines.

Gene is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bauer, two brothers, August of Corning, and Fred with the Army overseas; two sisters, Mr. Martin Miller and Mrs. Cecil Costin, both of Corning, one niece, Mary Alice [illegible], two brother-in-law, Martin Miller and Cecil Costin, now on active duty in the Navy; and two sisters-in-law, Mrs. August Bauer of Corning and Mrs. Fred Bauer of Baltimore, Maryland, and a number of other relatives and a host of friends.

He was affiliated with the Federated Church in Corning.

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, January 25, 1945, Page 1 (photograph included)

Memorial Service For Pfc. Gene Bauer Sunday

A memorial service will be held next Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the Federated Church in memory of Pfc. E. Eugene Bauer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bauer of Corning, killed in action in Belgium on December 20, 1944. He was with the 82nd Paratroop Infantry and entered military service May, 16, 1943, and went overseas last June.

The Memorial Service will be in charge of Rev. A. E. Nelson, pastor of the Federated Church, and the local American Legion. The public is invited to attend the service.

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, February 01, 1945, Page 1

Memorial For Eugene Bauer

Was Killed In Belgium December 20, 1944

A beautiful and impressive memorial service was held at the Federated church Sunday afternoon, Feb. 4, at 2:30 o’clock, in memory of Pfc. Emil Eugene Bauer, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bauer, of Corning. In spite of bad roads and unpleasant weather conditions, a large crowd gathered to pay final tribute to one more of Corning’s finest boys who was called to make the supreme sacrifice. Gene was a member of the 82nd Airborne Infantry, and gave his life in the service of his country, on December 20th, in Belgium, at the age of 20 years an seven months.

Two recent pictures of Gene, in military uniform, were prominently placed, one on white draped stand in the vestibule, flanked by two white candles and baskets of mixed flowers, roses, pink carnations and snapdragons. The other picture was placed similarly beneath the pulpit with two large bouquets of red roses, the family offering, and white tapers in crystal holders flanking the stand. Other flower including a bouquet of jonquils and pink carnations, a gift of his High School class, decorated the piano and the honor roll. Military guard of honor, Max McConnell and William Wheatley, stood at attending beside the picture during the service.

Organ Prelude

Entering the church to the solemn strains of the organ Prelude, the family, preceded by Rev. A. E. Nelson, the pastor, were conducted to their places, while the audience stood. The pastor gave the call to worship, which was immediately followed by the vocal solo, “The City Four Square,” sung by John Riegel, accompanied at the organ by Mary masker. Selected scriptural reading of comfort and consolation were then read by the pastor, followed with prayer and reading of the obituary of Pfc. Bauer. The sermon theme was taken from St. John chapter 15, verses 13 and 14: “Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.”

The story of the Man of Galilee and his great sacrifice for humanity and humanity’s ingratitude was told and all were urged to carry the torch thrown from fallen hands, that the light of Christian faith and principles should endure, and that all might better appreciate the sacrifice by living better lives.

Legion Ritual

Following the benediction, the Legion Chaplain, Fred Parcher, read the ritualistic salutation to the family and presented the flag to the mother of the deceased. The customary gun salute and taps were given. The national colors were retired followed by the Legion members. Rev. Nelson conducted the family and relatives from the church and stood at the memorial picture in the vestibule as the audience left the church.

A number of relatives from Des Moines were present for the services, including Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Johnson, Florence and Donald; Mrs. Lawrence Davis; Mrs. Joe Leo; Mr. and Mrs. John Johnson, Helen, Betty and Jack; Mr. and Mrs. Donald Sillwell and Donnie; Mr. and Mrs. Ed Mattis and Emil Johnson, the last, the uncle for whom Gene was named.

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, February 08, 1945, Page 1

News About Adams County Men and Women in the Service

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bauer have received the Purple Heart Award for their son, Gene, which was issued February 23rd 1945.

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, April 19, 1945, Page 6

FIRST RETURNED WAR DEAD

Bauer Rites Here Friday

Military Services To Be Conducted
American Legion, Guard Assist

Corning will play tribute to its first returned dead of World War II here Friday afternoon.

Military funeral services will be conducted at the Federate Church for Pfc. E. Eugene Bauer, 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bauer, Sr., of Corning, beginning at 2:30 o’clock.

Pfc. Bauer was killed in action in Belgium, December 20, 1944, while serving with the famous 82nd Airborne Division. He was buried at Henri Chapelle, Belgium. His body was returned to Corning Wednesday.

Services will be conducted by the Rev. Lawrence Murphy and the Rev. V. A. Bloomquist, assisted by Ouren Post 117 of the American Legion and Headquarters and Headquarters Company, National Guard unit.

Pfc. Bauer was graduated from the Corning High school in 1942. He enlisted in the army May 18, 1943 and entered training at Ft. Sill, Oklahoma, in the field artillery. He was transferred to the infantry in England and in October 1944 joined the Paratrooper, receiving his “Wings and Boots” October 28, 1944.

All Corning stores will be closed Friday afternoon, from 2:15 p. m. to 3:30 p. m.

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, December 11, 1947, Page 1

Obituaries

EUGENE BAUER

Private First Class Eugene Bauer was born May 20, 1924 in Corning, Iowa, the youngest son of Fred and Ellen Bauer. He attended the Corning Schools and graduated with the class of 1942. After his graduation, he assisted his father in the garage until he entered military training in Field Artillery at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, May 18, 1943.

He went overseas in June 1944. He was transferred to the Infantry after arriving in England and joined the Paratroopers, receiving his “Wings and Boots” on October 28, 1944. On Dec. 20, 1944 he was killed “at the Front” and buried at Henry Chapelle Cemetery in Belgium at the age of 20 years and 7 months. On December 10, 1947 his body was returned to his home town of Corning for final burial.

Gene is survived by his parents; two brothers, August of Corning and Fred of Baltimore, Maryland; two sisters, Catherine and Chestine, both of Corning; two brothers-in-law, Martin Miller and Cecil Costin, both of Corning; two sisters-in-law, Mrs. August Bauer of Corning and Mrs. Fred Bauer of Baltimore, Maryland; three nieces, Mary Alice, Jean and Kathleen; three nephews, Bruce, Bobby and Johnnie; one grandmother, Mrs. Elizabeth Bauer of Corning, and a number of other relatives and a host of friends.

Funeral services were held from the Federated Church in Corning, Friday, December 12, 1947 at 2:30 p. m., in charge of Rev. Lawrence Murphy and Rev. V. A. Bloomquist. Full military rites were observed and in charge of Ouren Post American Legion and Headquarters Co., National Guard. Corning stores closed during the services.

John Riegel furnished music for the service, with Mary Masker at the organ. Pall bearers were Edward Lauvstad, Walter Lauvstad, Dean McGaffin, Darwin Marlatt, Theodore Johnson and Raymond Gauthier. Burial was in Walnut Grove Cemetery.  

Source: Adams County Free Press, Corning, Iowa, Thursday, December 18, 1947, Page 7