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CHAPTER IX

WEBSTER IN THE CIVIL WAR


COMPANY '1" THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT 
IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

On the 9th day of July, 1862, Samuel J. Kirkwood, governor of Iowa, issued 
the following proclamation : 

I have this day received from the secretary of war a telegram, requesting 
me to raise as soon as practicable, for the United States service, for three 
years or during the war, five regiments of volunteer infantry, being a part of 
the quota of this state, under the late call of the president for 300,000 men. The 
preservation of the Union, the perpetuity of our government, the honor of our 
state, demand that this requisition shall be promptly met. Our harvest is upon 
us, and we have feared a lack of force to secure it. But we must imitate our 
brave Iowa boys in the field, meet new emergencies with jiew exertions. Our 
old men and our boys unfit for war, if need be, our women, must help to 
gather harvest, while those able to bear arms go forth to aid their brave brethren 
in the field. The necessity is urgent. Our national existence is at stake. The 
more promptly the president is furnished the needed troops, the more speedily 
will this unholy rebellion be crushed, and the blessings of peace again visit our 
land. Until then we men must expect the hardships and privations of war. The 
time has come when men must make  as many have already made  sacrifices 
of ease, comfort and business, for the cause of the country. The enemy, by 
a sweeping conscription, have forced into their ranks all men capable of bearing 
arms. Our government has, as yet, relied upon the voluntary action of our citi- 
zens. But, if need be, the same energies must be exerted to preserve our govern- 
ment that traitors are using to destroy it. * * * 

Iowa City, July 9, 1862. Samuel J. Kirkwood. 

The patriotic sons of Iowa promptly responded to this earnest appeal of tiie 
governor. The Thirty-second Infantry was one of the five regiments that were 
organized and sent ,.to the field in compliance with this call of the president. 
Recruiting began as soon as the governor's proclamation was published. Camp 
Franklin, near Dubuque, Iowa, was designated by the governor as the rendezvous 
of the regiment. The ten companies were ordered into quarters as fast as their 
organizations were completed. It would appear, from the wide discrepancy in 
dates upon which the orders were given, that some of the companies had been 
partially, if not wholly, organized in anticipation of the call, as the dates of the 

93 



94 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

orders ranged from July 3 to September 8, 1862. Upon the latter date the 
companies had all assembled at Camp Franklin, and, on the 6th day of October, 
1862, they were there mustered into the service of the United States, by Captain 
George S. Pierce, of the regular army, and the organization of the regiment was 
completed by the muster in of the field and staff officers on the same date. 

Colonel John Scott had resigned the office of Lieutenant Colonel of the 
Third Iowa Infantry, upon being tendered the appointment, by Governor Kirk- 
wood, of the office of colonel of the Thirty-second Infantry. Upon the recom- 
mendation of Colonel Scott, the governor appointed Edward H. Mix, lieutenant 
colonel, and Gustavus A. Eberhart, major, of the regiment. These officers had 
all had the benefit of experience as soldiers in one of the first regiments that 
the state had sent into the field (the Third Iowa Infantry), and had fully demon- 
strated their fitness and capacity to properly discharge the duties of their respec- 
tive offices. The staff officers were all men of high character and ability, and 
the regiment was fortunate in their selection. The same may be said of the 
company officers. An examination of the roster of the Thirty-second Iowa will 
show that the average age of both officers and men was greater than that of 
the earlier regiments, and there was a proportionately larger number of married 
men among them. The records show that there was an aggregate number of 
925 men and officers in the regiment, at the date of its muster into the service. 
During its stay at Camp Franklin, the time was utilized to the best advantage, 
and, when the regiment left the state, it had probably acquired a better general 
knowledge of the duties it would be called upon to perform, than most of the 
regiments which preceded it had been able to obtain, prior to leaving their 
rendezvous. 

On November 16, 1862, the regiment embarked on transports and was con- 
veyed to St. Louis, Missouri, and went into quarters at Benton Barracks. On 
November 25th, by order of Major General Curtis, commanding department of 
Missouri, Companies B, C, E, H, I and K, with the regimental headquarters, left 
St. Louis and were conveyed to New Madrid, Missouri, and, on the next day, 
Companies A, D, F and G, under command of Major Eberhart, were conveyed to 
Cape Girardeau, Missouri. From this time until March 4, 1864, the operations 
of the detachment of the four companies under Major Eberhart and the six com- 
panies under Colonel Scott were distinct, separate and independent of each other. 

Upon arriving at New Madrid with the six companies of his regiment. Colonel 
Scott, in accordance with his instructions, assumed command of the post. It did 
not take him long to discover that, prior to his arrival, disloyal men had been 
favored and protected; that large amounts of merchandise of all descriptions 
had been distributed from New Madrid and had gone beyond the Union lines, 
into the possession of those who were engaged in armed rebellion. Negroes, who 
had escaped and sought protection of the Union soldiers, had been returned to 
slavery. Colonel Scott did not believe in the policy of conciliating those who 
were in full sympathy with the rebellion and who were active in their efforts 
to furnish aid and comfort to the enemy. The most active of those rebel 
sympathizers was a man who was not a naturalized citizen of the United States, 
and who claimed the protection of the British government. The general in 
command of the department listened to the protests of those who wanted to
94 
images
Hon. George W. Bassett                                            Captain J.A.O. Yeoman
Promoter of Fort Dodge and Fort Ridgley Railroad
 OF WEBSTER COUNTY                                               95 

have Colonel Scott removed from the command of the post and strange as it may 
appear, seemed inclined to grant their request. 

On the 17th of December, a detachment from Colonel Scott's command, com- 
posed of Companies C and I, under command of Captain Peebles, made a recon- 
noissance into the country west of New Madrid. The detachment was absent five 
days, marched about one hundred miles, and captured eight prisoners and a 
quantity of arms and stock. It discovered no considerable force of the enemy, 
and showed that the report that a large rebel force was moving against New 
Madrid was without foundation. On December 23d Colonel Scott, with a 
detachment from his command, embarked on the steamer "Davenport" and pro- 
ceeded on a tour of examination of the points along the river at which illicit trade 
(or smuggling goods into the enemy's lines) was being carried on, with the view 
to prevent same, as far as it was possible to do so with the resources at his 
command. On his return from this trip. Colonel Scott reported to General 
Thomas A. Davies, at Columbus, Kentucky, who had command of the military 
district of Columbus, and who claimed that the post of New Madrid was included 
in his district, and was supported in that statement by General Fisk, who was 
present and who had just returned from the headquarters of General Curtis in St. 
Louis. Up to that time Colonel Scott had received his orders direct from 
General Curtis. General Davies stated that it was necessary that Colonel Scott 
should at once abandon the post at New Madrid, and proceed with his com- 
mand to Fort Pillow, which was in danger of being captured by the enemy. 
Feeling that the abandonment of New Madrid was unwise, but recognizing the 
fact that General Davies was his superior officer. Colonel Scott took the precau- 
tion to request a written order, which was given, as follows : 

Columbus, December 27, 1862. 
Colonel Scott, Commanding Thirty-second Iowa, New Madrid : 

You will immediately proceed to New Madrid, burn the gun carriages and 
wooden platforms, and spike the guns and destroy the ammunition totally. Take 
the same boat and proceed to Fort Pillow, under convoy of gunboat, and 
report to Colonel Wolfe, commanding at that place. 

Thomas A. Davies, Brigadier General. 

Colonel Scott, having made personal protest against the necessity for this 
order, proceeded to obey it, and carried out his instructions to the letter. He 
proceeded with his command to Fort Pillow and reported to the commander. 
Colonel Wolfe, for duty. General Curtis censured Colonel Scott for obeying the 
order of General Davies, and a military commission was appointed to investigate 
the matter and report its findings to General Curtis. After a full and complete 
investigation, the commission found that Colonel Scott did right in obeying the 
order, that he simply performed his duty, and was honorably acquitted of all 
blame. The report was signed by Brigadier General William K. Strong, presi- 
dent, and Colonel Albert G. Bracket, recorder, of the commission, and the find- 
ings were approved by General Curtis, and thus Colonel Scott was completely 
vindicated from the unjust censure, not only by the commission, but by General 
Curtis himself. It is the first duty of the soldier to obey orders, otherwise it 
would be impossible to maintain discipline. There were many instances in which 
                                                                               


96 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

subordinate officers yielded prompt obedience to orders which as subsequent 
events proved, were unwise and should not have been given, but the officer in 
authority had the right to demand obedience, and those under his command were 
bound to obey, no matter what their opinion might be as to the wisdom or unwis- 
dom of the order. It will, therefore, be seen that Colonel Scott simply acted the 
part of a true soldier, and gave a good example to the officers and men of his own 
regiment, who like himself, could not see the necessity for abandoning the post. 

The headquarters of the regiment remained at Fort Pillow until June i8, 
1863. During a part of this time Company B, with Capt. A. B. Miller in com- 
mand, occupied the post at Fulton, Tennessee, three miles below Fort Pillow. 
Detachments were sent on scouts in the vicinity of the fort, from time to 
time, acting in conjunction with the Second Illinois Cavalry, and occasionally 
these scouting parties came into contact with the enemy, but the fighting which 
took place mainly devolved upon the cavalry which proceeded in advance, the 
infantry following as a support in case the enemy were found in considerable 
force, which was seldom the case. Garrison duty and daily drill was the 
principal duty of the troops at Fort Pillow. On the 17th and iSth of June, 
1863, the six companies of the Thirty-second Iowa embarked on transports and 
were conveyed to Columbus, Kentucky, at which place they went into camp and 
remained until January 21, 1864. 

On July 10, 1863, Union City was captured by a force of rebels. This place 
was twenty-six miles south of Columbus, on the Mobile & Ohio Railroad. 
Colonel Scott received orders to proceed with his command by rail to Union 
City, which order was promptly obeyed, but the enemy abandoned the place and 
retreated rapidly before Colonel Scott's command arrived and, in ol)edience to 
orders from General Asboth, the colonel returned with his troops to Columbus. 
On July II, 1863, Colonel Scott succeeded to the command of the post of Colum- 
bus. At this time Company C, Captain Peebles commanding, was mounted and 
attached to the Fourth Missouri Cavalry, for scouting duty. Company E, under 
Captain Jones, was sent to Fort Quimby, near Columbus, and Companies H 
and K, under Captain Benson, were sent to Island Number Ten. This left only 
Companies B and I on duty at regimental headquarters, with Captain A. B. 
Miller in command, Lieutenant Colonel Mix being absent at that time, as presi- 
dent of a court-martial at Cairo, 111. The service performed by Company C, 
with the Fourth ^Missouri Cavalry, was arduous and important. That regiment 
was constantly in pursuit of roving bands of the enemy, engaged in securing and 
forwarding conscripts to the rebel army, and in committing depredations upon 
the property of loyal citizens in the surrounding regions of Kentucky and 
Tennessee. These expeditions extended, over hundreds of miles and involved 
much hardship to the troops engaged in them. The two companies at Island 
Number Ten also made frequent expeditions upon both sides of the river, in one 
of which John D. Baker, of Company H, was killed. 

On January 20, 1864, Colonel Scott received orders to assemble the six 
companies of his regiment at Columbus, where they shortly afterwards embarked 
and were conveyed to Vicksburg, ]\Iississippi, where they disembarked and went 
into camp. General Sherman was just then completing his preparations for that 
remarkal)le expedition which penetrated into the heart of the state of Mississippi 
and inflicted a telling blow to the rebellion, in that portion of the south, from

images
Scenes in Fort Dodge in 1863
First schoolhouse, Bird's-eye view of the city, Webster County courthouse,
Commercial National Bank corner, Central Avenue, looking west, Catholic Church, site of Corpus Christi

HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 97 

which it never fully recovered. Colonel Scott's detachment of the Thirty-second 
Iowa was assigned to the Second Brigade of the Third Division of the Sixteenth 
Army Corps ; Col. William T. Shaw of the Fourteenth Iowa Infantry was in 
command of the brigade ; Brigadier General A. J. Smith commanded the division, 
and Maj. Gen. S. A. Hurlbut was in command of the corps. The army left 
Vicksburg on the 3d day of February, and returned to that place on March 4, 

1864, having marched 328 miles. The troops had been supplied with but ten 
days' rations when the march began, and, after that supply was exhausted, lived 
upon such food as could be obtained in the country through which they 
passed. This involved the necessity of sending out forage trains every day, 
with large details to guard them, as the enemy's cavalry in large force hovered 
in front and upon either flank of General Sherman's army, which was composed 
of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Corps and one division of cavalry. There was 
more or less fighting every day. mainly done by the cavalry which led the advance 
and by the infantry which constituted the guard to forage trains. The troops had 
no tents while on this expedition and suffered much from the inclemency of the 
weather. The six companies of the Thirty-second Iowa, under command of 
Colonel Scott, performed their share of duty upon this long and arduous march, 
but they did not come into contact with any considerable body of the enemy. The 
only casualties reported were : George A. Todd, of Company I, captured, and 
Edward Flood, of Company C, killed, while engaged in guarding forage train. 
At the close of his official report. Colonel Scott says : "The labors and privations 
of this expedition were borne alike, by officers and men, with great cheerfulness, 
and a capacity for enduring , fatigue and exposure both gratifying and 
astonishing." 

The six companies of the regiment arrived at Vicksburg, on their return 
from the Meridian Expedition, on March 4, 1864, and were there joined by the 
other four companies from whom they had been so long separated. 

ROSTER COMPANY I THIRTY-SECOND REGIMENT IOWA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

Jonathan Hutchinson, captain ; Amos S. Collins, first lieutenant ; Alexander 
Dowd, second lieutenant. 

Allison, Alexander D., age eighteen; residence, Dayton; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted, February 28, 1864; mustered, February 28, 1864; transferred to Com- 
pany A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Andrews, Celestius B., age twenty-six; residence, Otho; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted, August 16, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 24, 

1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Auyer, Cyrus D., age nineteen ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity. New York ; 
enlisted. August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, June 2, 1865, 
]\Iemphis, Tennessee. 

Baldridge, Isaac N., age eighteen; residence, Webster county; nativity, New 
York; enlisted, February 29, 1864; mustered, February 29, 1864; transferred 
to Company A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Baldridge, James, age twenty-two; residence, Webster county; nativity, Illi- 
nois; enlisted, August 12, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; wounded; discharged 
for disability, May 20, 1865, Davenport, Iowa. 



98 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

Baldridge, Samuel, age thirty-two ; residence, Dayton ; nativity. Illinois ; 
enlisted, August 12, 1862; mustered, December 24, 1862; died of disease, June 
12, 1863, Fort Pillow, Tennessee; buried in Mississippi River National Cemetery, 
jMemphis, Tennessee, section i, grave 106. 

Baldridge, Thomas ]., age twenty-five ; residence, Webster county ; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted, February 29, 1864; mustered, February 29, 1864; transferred 
to Company A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Baldwin, Philander R., age twenty-five ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted, August 20, 1862, as first corporal; mustered, October 7, 1862; 
promoted fifth sergeant, October 6, 1862; fourth sergeant. May 30, 1864; third 
sergeant, July 4, 1864; mustered out, August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Barnes, John F. ; rejected, August 22, 1862, by mustering officer. 

Beach, Alexander, age twenty-five; residence, Fort Dodge; nativity. Ohio; 
enlisted, January 4, 1864; mustered, January 4, 1864; transferred to Company 
A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Binkley, Perry, age eighteen; residence, Webster county; nativity. Iowa; 
enlisted, January 14, 1865 ; mustered, January 14, 1865 ; transferred to Com- 
pany A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Birchard, Abner T., age twenty-seven; residence, Boonsborough : nativity, 
Pennsylvania; enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; promoted, 
quartermaster sergeant, November 8, 1862; mustered out. May 12. 1865, St. 
Louis, Missouri. 

Blackman, Henry, enlisted, Alay i, 1863, as under cook; mustered, June 30, 
1863 ; no further record found. 

Blain, George, age eighteen ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; 
enlisted, August 13, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; died of disease. July 19, 

1864, Memphis, Tennessee; buried in Mississippi River National Cemetery, 
Memphis, Tennessee, section i, grave 310. 

Bond, Judson A., age eighteen; residence, Crawford county; nativity, ]\Iassa- 
chusetts; enlisted, December 25, 1863; mustered, December 25, 1863; transferred 
to Company A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Booth, Ambrose, age thirty-nine ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, England ; 
enlisted, August 19, 1862, as fifth sergeant; mustered, October 7, 1862; promoted 
first sergeant, October 6, 1862; second lieutenant, April ir, 1864; first lieutenant, 
October 14, 1864; mustered out, i\ugust 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Booth, Henry, age eighteen ; residence, Webster county ; nativity. England ; 
enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 2, 1864; transferred to Company A, 
Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. (Henry B. Booth.) 

Boyle, Richard; enlisted, June 30, 1863, as under cook; mustered, June 30, 
1863; no further record found. 

Brewer, Oliver, age eighteen ; residence, Webster county ; nativity. New York ; 
enlisted, January 30, 1865 ; mustered, January 30, 1865 ; transferred to Company 
A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. (Oliver A. Brewer.) 

Brown, Charles R., age twenty-two; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity. Illinois; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 24, 

1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Byrne, James, age twenty-three ; residence, Dayton ; nativity. Illinois ; 
enlisted, August 12, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 24, 
1865. Clinton, Iowa. 



HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 99 

Byrne, John, age twenty-one ; residence, Dayton ; nativity, Illinois ; enlisted, 
/agust 15, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 24, 1865, 
''Clinton, Iowa. 

Carey, James, age twenty-eight; residence, Fort Dodge; nativity, Ireland; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 24, 
1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Cass, George T., age thirty ; residence, Dakotah ; nativity. New Hampshire ; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862, as second corporal; mustered, October 7, 1862; pro- 
moted first corporal, October 6, 1862; discharged for disability, December 19, 
1863, Columbus, Kentucky. 

Chandler, Robert, age twenty-one ; residence, Hardin county ; nativity, Ten- 
nessee; enlisted, November 16, 1863; deserted, January 25, 1864, ^Memphis, 
Tennessee. 

Claflin, Cornelius, age thirty-nine; residence, Otho; nativity, New York; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; discharged for promotion 
as first lieutenant Fiftieth, United States Colored Infantry, December 30, 1863. 

Clark, John H., age eighteen; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Iowa; enlisted, 
January 4, 1864; mustered, January 4, 1864; transferred to Company A, Eighth 
Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Coffin, Lorenzo S., age thirty-eight; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity. New 
Hampshire; enlisted, August 22, 1862, as first sergeant; mustered October 7, 
1862; promoted quartermaster sergeant, October 6, 1862. 

Collins, Amos S., age thirty ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; 
appointed first lieutenant, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; resigned 
for promotion in Veteran Reserve Corps, October 13, 1864. Company D, 
Sixteenth Infantry. (James S. Collins.) 

Conlee, Horace D., age twenty-two ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, Illinois ; 
enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 2, 1864; transferred to Company 
A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Conlee, Smith T., age twenty-one; residence, Webster county; nativity, Illi- 
nois; enlisted, January 11, 1865; mustered, January 11, 1865; transferred to 
Company A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Crosby, Charles T., age twenty-seven ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity. New 
York; enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 2, 1864; transferred to Com- 
pany A, Eighth Infantry, 1865. 

Crosby, George H., age twenty-three; residence, Kossuth county: nativity, 
New York; enlisted, January 25, 1865; mustered, January 25, 1865; transferred 
to Company A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Crosby, William H., age sixteen; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity. New York; 
enlisted, July 28, 1863 ; mustered, July 28, 1863 ; promoted musician ; transferred 
to Company A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Cusey, Henry C, age eighteen ; residence, Dakotah ; nativity, Illinois ; enlisted, 
August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 24. 1865, 
Clinton, Iowa. 

Davis, Albert, age thirty-five ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, Nova Scotia ; 
enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 2, 1864; transferred to Company 
A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

De Witt, Francis M., age twenty-seven ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity. Ken- 



100 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

tucky; enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; transferred to 
Veteran Reserve Corps, July 30, 1864; discharged for disability, February 25, 
1865. 

De Witt, George W., age eighteen; enlisted, January 30, 1865; mustered, Jan- 
uary 30, 1865 ; transferred to Company A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

De Witt, Simon J., age twenty-one ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, Ken- 
tucky; enlisted, November 21, 1863; mustered, November 21, 1863; died of 
disease, March 14, 1864, Memphis, Tennessee; buried in Mississippi River 
National Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee, section i, grave 212. 

Dowd, Alexander, age thirty-three; residence, Dayton; nativity, Ohio; 
appointed second lieutenant, August 12, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; pro- 
moted captain, April 10, 1864; mustered out, August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Dwyer, Michael, age twenty- four ; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Ireland; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; discharged for disability, 
May 29, 1863, Fort Pillow, Tennessee. 

Edson. William, age twenty-eight; residence, Otho; nativity, ^Massachusetts ; 
enlisted, August 16, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, June 17, 
1865, Chicago, Illinois. 

Ewing, James R., age twenty-two; residence, Border Plains; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; promoted eighth 
corporal, October 10, 1864; fifth corporal, December 5, 1864; mustered out, 
August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Fagan, Michael, age eighteen ; residence, Palo Alto county ; nativity, Ire- 
land; enlisted, January 4, 1863; mustered, January 4, 1863; died, February 25, 
1864, Cairo, Illinois ; buried in National Cemetery, Mound City, Illinois. 

Flaherty, Edward, age twenty-four ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity-, Mary- 
land; enlisted, August 20, 1862, as eighth corporal; mustered, October 3, 1862; 
promoted, seventh corporal, October 6, 1862; sixth corporal, December 2^,, 
1863; fifth corporal, May 30, 1864; third corporal, July 4, 1864; second cor- 
poral, December 5, 1864; mustered out, August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Fogarty, Edward, age thirty-six ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, Ireland ; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 21, 1862; wounded. May 18, 
1864, Yellow Bayou, Louisiana; mustered out, August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Ford, John H., age twenty-five ; residence, Dakotah ; nativity, Ohio ; enlisted, 
August 22, 1862, as second sergeant; mustered, October 7, 1862; promoted first 
lieutenant of Company A, March i, 1864. 

Foster, Jeremiah, age thirty ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, Kentucky ; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 
24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Frahm, Joachim, age twenty-four ; residence, Dayton ; nativity, Germany ; 
enlisted, August 15, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 
24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Franks, Henry H., age twenty-three; residence, Crawford county, nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted, December 25, 1863; mustered, December 25, 1863; discharged 
for disability, September 13, 1864, Jefiferson Barracks (St. Louis), Alissouri. 

Fuller, Clark, age thirty; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Ohio; enlisted, 
August 12, 1862; mustered, October 31, 1862; promoted commissary sergeant, 
March 14, 1864; reduced to ranks at his own request, January 15, 1865; mus- 
tered out, August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa.

Fort Dodge
Fort Dodge in 1869
From lithograph of drawing by Bill R.D.T. Davis
HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 101 

Gardner, Charles W., age nineteen; residence, Webster county; nativity,. 
Ohio; enhsted, January lO, 1865; mustered, January 10, 1865; transferred to 
Company A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Gardner, Peyton R., age twenty-one; residence, Eort Dodge; nativity, New 
Hampshire; enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered 
out, August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Gardner, Wallace P., age nineteen; residence, Dayton; nativity, Illinois; en- 
listed. August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; died of disease, June 5, 
1863. Fort Pillow, Tennessee; buried in Mississippi River National Cemetery, 
Memphis, Tennessee, section i, grave 63. 

Gatchel, Uriah D., age twenty-two ; residence, Border Plains ; nativity, Ohio ; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered October 7, 1862; died of disease, December 
18, 1864, Keokuk, Iowa; buried in Oakland Cemetery, Keokuk, Iowa. 

Gilday. Francis M., age eighteen; residence, Webster county; nativity. New 
York: enlisted, January 11, 1865; mustered, January 11, 1865; transferred to 
Company A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Goodrich, Benjamin B., age twenty-five; residence, Border Plains; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted. August 13, 1862, as fourth sergeant; mustered, October 7, 1862; 
promoted third sergeant, May 30, 1864; first sergeant, July 4, 1864; mustered 
out, August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Goodrich, Ezekiel L., age twenty-three ; residence, Webster county ; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted, August 15, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, 
August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Gwinn, Rol^ert M.; residence, Boonesborough ; nativity, Pennsylvania; en- 
listed, August II, 1862, as fifer; mustered, -October 7, 1862; reduced to ranks 
at his own request, March 20, 1863 ; mustered out, August 24. 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Haines, George W. ; enlisted, June 30, 1863, as under cook; mustered, June 
30, 1863; transferred to Second Tennessee Heavy Artillery. 

Hanchett, George W., age thirty-eight; residence, Humboldt county; 
nativity. New York; enlisted, August 22, 1862, as sixth corporal; mustered, 
October 7, 1862; promoted fifth corporal. October 6, 1862; fourth corporal, 
December 23, 1863; third corporal. May 30, 1864; first corporal, July 4, 1864; 
mustered out, August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Hancock, Walter R. W., age twenty-five; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, 
Kentucky; enlisted, August 20, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, 
August 24. 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Hart, George D., age twenty-seven; residence, Otho; nativity, Illinois; 
enlisted, August 16, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; transferred to Veteran 
Reserve Corps, March 18, 1865; discharged for disability, July i, 1865, Jeffer- 
son Barracks (St. Louis), Missouri. 

Hart, Sherman, age thirty-three; residence, Border Plains; nativity, Con- 
necticut; enlisted, August 14, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; died of dis- 
ease, September 19, 1863, Island No. 10, Tennessee; buried in Mississippi River 
National Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee. 

Haskins, Alfred T., age thirty-two; residence, Webster county; nativity, 
New York; enlisted, January 18, 1865; mustered, January 18, 1865; trans- 
ferred to Company B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Hefley, John M., age thirty-seven; residence, Webster county; nativity, 



102 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

Pennsylvania; enlisted, January lo, 1865; mustered, January 10, 1865; trans- 
ferred to Company B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. (John M. Heffley.) 

Hightree, John, age thirty ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, Holland ; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; died, disease. Fort Dodge, 
Iowa, September 10, 1863. 

Howell, Daniel T., age thirty-two; residence, Fort Dodge; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 
24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Hulsizer, Benjamin, age twenty-four; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity. New 
Jersey; enlisted, August 20, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, 
August 24, 1865. Clinton, Iowa. 

Hulsizer, Hiram, age thirty-six; residence, Fort Dodge; nativity. New Jer- 
sey; enlisted, August 20, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; promoted eighth 
corporal, October 6, 1862; reduced to ranks at his own request, February 4, 
1863; wounded severely, April 9, 1864, Pleasant Flill, Louisiana; discharged for 
disability, June 2, 1865, Keokuk, Iowa. 

Hurlburt, Elmore, age sixteen; enlisted, December 19, 1864; mustered, 
December 19, 1864; transferred to Company B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 
Company A, Forty-eighth Infantry. ^ 

Hutchison, John; rejected, August 22, 1862, by mustering officer. 

Hutchison, Jonathan, age forty-two; residence, Fort Dodge; nativity, Ohio; 
appointed captain, August 20, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; promoted 
major, April 10, 1864; lieutenant colonel, August 23, 1865, not mustered; brevet 
lieutenant colonel of United States Volunteers, 1865 ; mustered out, August 
24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Hutchison, Matthias, age eighteen ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, Ohio ; 
enlisted, August 20, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; killed in action, April 
9, 1864, Pleasant Hill, Louisiana. 

Huxford, Morton V., age twenty-one; residence, Boonesborough ; na.tivity, 
Indiana; enlisted, August 11, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, 
August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Jenkins, Andrew K., age twenty-five; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted, June 2, 1864; mustered, June 2, 1864; transferred to Com- 
pany B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. (xA.ndrew R. Jenkins.) 

Jenkins, James S., age twenty-one; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 2, 1864; transferred to 
Company B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Jenkins, John S., age twenty-seven ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 2, 1864; transferred to 
Company B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Jones, George W., age thirty-two; residence, Fort Dodge; nativity. New 
York; enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 2, 1864; transferred to Com- 
pany B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Karcher, Philip, age thirty ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out. August 
24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Keates, John, age thirty-nine; residence, Webster county; nativity. England; 



HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 103 

enlisted, January lo, 1865; mustered, January 10, 1865; transferred to Com- 
pany B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Kellogg, Elias D., age twenty-four; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity. New 
York; enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; promoted eighth 
corporal, February 4, 1863; seventh corporal, December 23, 1863; sixth cor- 
poral. May 30, 1864; fourth corporal, December 4, 1864; wounded; mustered out, 
May 10, 1865. Company F, Second Cavalry. 

Kinning, Henry J., age twenty-nine ; residence, .Monona county ; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 2, 1864; died, September 
13, 1864, Jefiferson Barracks, -Missouri; buried in National Cemetery, Jefferson 
Barracks (St. Louis), Missouri, section 31, grave 142. 

Kramer, Augustus, age twenty-one; residence, Dayton; nativity, Germany; 
enlisted, August 15, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 
24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Lynn, James, age thirty-seven; residence, Fort Dodge; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania ; enlisted, August 22, 1862, as fourth corporal ; mustered, October 7, 
1862; promoted third corporal, October 6, 1862; second corporal, December 23, 
1863; first corporal, ]\Iay 30, 1864; fifth sergeant, July 4, 1864; second lieuten- 
ant, October 14, 1864; mustered out, August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Lyons, I^atrick, age twenty-eight; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Ireland; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 
24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

jMcCauley, Robert, age thirty-two; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity. New 
York; enlisted, August 20, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, 
August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

INIcCauley, William, age twenty-five; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Can- 
ada; enlisted, August 15, 1862, as wagoner; mustered, August 7, 1862; mustered 
out, August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

McHenry, Isaac, age twenty-three ; residence, Dakotah ; nativity, Ohio ; 
enlisted, August 16, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 24, 
1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

McHenry, John N., age twenty-five; residence, Dakotah; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted, August 16, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 
24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

McKitrick, John, age thirty-five; residence, Humboldt county; nativity, 
Scotland; enlisted, January 4, 1864; mustered, January 4, 1864; discharged for 
disability, June 21, 1865, Montgomery, Alabama. 

McLean, Alexander, age forty-three; residence, Humboldt county; nativity, 
Scotland; enlisted, January 4, 1864; mustered, January 4, 1864; transferred 
to Company B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Maher, j\Iichael, age twenty-four; residence, Fort Dodge; nativity, Ire- 
land; enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; promoted sixth 
corporal, July 4, 1864; mustered out, August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Maloy, David, age twenty-five ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, Ireland ; 
enlisted, August 21, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 24, 
1865, Clinton. Iowa. 

']\Iarsh, John, age eighteen; residence, Webster county; nativity, England; 
enlisted. February 29, 1864; mustered, February 29, 1864; transferred to Com- 
pany B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 



104 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

Manpin, John C, age twenty-eight ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, Illinois ; 
enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 2, 1864; transferred to Company 
B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Mayberry, John R., age eighteen; residence, Webster county; nativity, Illi- 
nois; enlisted, January 5, 1864; mustered, January 5, 1864; wounded and 
taken prisoner, April 9, 1864, Pleasant Hill, Louisiana; discharged for wounds,. 
December 16, 1864. 

Mayberry, William F., age eighteen; residence, Webster county; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted, August 15, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; promoted 
eighth corporal, December 5, 1864; mustered out, August 24, 1865, Clinton,. 
Iowa. 

]\Ieans, John, age thirty-four; residence, Dakotah; nativity, Pennsylvania; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 3, 1862; mustered out, August 24, 
1865, Clinton, Iowa.  

Metcalf, Isaac, age thirty-nine; residence, Webster county; nativity, Indi- 
ana; enlisted, August 13, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; died of disease^ 
March 28, 1863, Fort Pillow, Tennessee ; buried in Mississippi River National 
Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee, section i, grave 56. 

Moore, Alfred, age forty-five ; residence. Fort Pillow, Tennessee ; enlisted. 
May I, 1863, as under cook; mustered, June 30, 1863; mustered out, August 
24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Moore, Edmond V., age twenty-three ; residence, Otho ; nativity, Ohio ; 
enlisted, August 13, 1862, as third corporal; mustered, October 7, 1862; pro- 
moted second corporal, October 6, 1862; first corporal, December 23, 1863; 
fifth sergeant, May 30, 1864; fourth sergeant, July 4, 1864; mustered out, 
August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Morse, Bartlett M., age twenty-three ; residence, Webster county ; nativity, 
Pennsylvania; enlisted, January 10, 1865; mustered, January 10, 1865; mus- 
tered out, June 8, 1865, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 

Mueller, Christian, age eighteen ; residence, Webster county ; nativity, Ger- 
many ; enlisted, January 10, 1865; mustered, January 10, 1865; transferred to 
Company B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. (Christian Muller.) 

Munroe, Henry H., age twenty-one; residence, Otho; nativity, Michigan; 
enlisted, August 15, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 24, 
1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Nagle, William H., age twenty; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted, August 20, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 24; 
1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

O'Hara, Patrick, age twenty-six ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, Ireland ; 
enlisted, August 21, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 24, 
1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

O'Neil, Michael, age forty-two ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, Ireland ; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; transferred to Veteran 
Reserve Corps, July 24, 1864; died of disease, March 17, 1865, Camp Douglass, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Pollock, William, age thirty-five; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Scotland; 
enlisted, August 20, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 
24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

image
Home of Hon. W. N. Meservey
built in 1858
HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 105 

Powers, William D., age thirty-five; residence, Fort Dodge; nativity, Ire- 
land; enlisted, August 22, 1862, as seventh corporal; mustered, October 7, 
1862; promoted sixth corporal, October 6, 1862; fifth corporal, December 23, 
1863; fourth corporal, May 30, 1864; second corporal, July 4, 1864; fifth 
sergeant, December 5, 1864; mustered out, August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Prescott, William T., age eighteen; residence, Dickinson county; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted, August 20, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; promoted seventh 
corporal, December 5, 1864; mustered out, August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Reilley, William, age thirty; residence, Fort Dodge; nativity, Scotland; 
enlisted, August 21, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; transferred to Twelfth 
United States Infantry, November 15, 1862. 

Roberts, Jonathan D., age thirty-four ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, 
Massachusetts; enlisted, August 20, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered 
out, August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Roberts, Orison; rejected, August 22, 1862, by mustering officer. 

Rood, Isaac P., age thirty-six; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity. New York; 
enlisted, January 4, 1864; mustered, January 4, 1864; transferred to Company 
B, Eighth Infantry, July 28, 1865. 

Rood, James, age twenty-five ; residence, Otho ; nativity. New York ; enlisted, 
August 15, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; killed in action, March 14, 1864, 
Fort De Russy, Louisiana. Buried, National Cemetery, Alexander, Louisiana, 
section i, grave 49. 

Rosil, Moses, age thirty-three; residence, Columbus, Kentucky; enlisted, 
'September 2, 1863, ^s under cook; mustered, September 2, 1863; mustered out, 
August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Rowley, James A., age twenty-six; residence, Dakotah; nativity, New York; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; promoted eighth cor- 
poral, December 23, 1863; seventh corporal, March 30, 1864; wounded fatally 
and taken prisoner, April 9, 1864, Pleasant Hill, Louisiana; died of wounds, April 
20, 1864, Pleasant Hill, Louisiana. 

Rowley, Mathew, age eighteen ; residence, W^aterloo ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; 
enlisted, January 11, 1865; died of disease, July 19, 1865, Montgomery, Ala- 
bama; buried in National Cemetery, Marietta, Georgia, section L, grave 573. 

Ruscoe, George, age thirty-nine ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity. New York ; 
enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 2, 1864; transferred to Company 
B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Russell, Francis \\'., age twenty-four; residence, Dakotah; nativity, Wiscon- 
sin; enlisted, August 20, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862.; discharged for dis- 
ability, March 29, 1863, Fort Pillow, Tennessee. See Company D, Ninth Cavalry. 

Russell, James, age twenty-one ; residence, Webster county ; nativity, Iowa ; 
enlisted, January 14, 1865; mustered, January 14, 1865; transferred to Com- 
pany B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Russell, John W., age twenty-eight ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, Ire- 
land; enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, 
August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Salisbury, William J., age nineteen; residence, Emmet county; nativity, 
Michigan; enlisted, January 4, 1863; mustered, January 4, 1863; taken prisoner, 
April 9, 1864, Pleasant Hill, Louisiana; transferred to Company B, Eighth 
Infantry, July 29, 1865. 



106 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

Scherff, Peter, age twenty-nine; residence, Webster county; nativity, Ger- 
many; enlisted, January lO, 1865; mustered, January 10, 1865; transferred to 
Company B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Snodgrass, Andrew W., age twenty-three; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, 
Indiana; enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; promoted, sev- 
enth corporal, July 4, 1864; fourth corporal, December 5, 1864; mustered out, 
August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Thomas, James H., age forty; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, New York; 
enlisted, August 19, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, June 2, 
1865, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Timmons, Anderson, age twenty-one; residence, Columbus, Kentucky; 
nativity, Tennessee; enlisted, November 4, 1863; mustered, November 4, 1863; 
deserted, December i, 1864, Nashville, Tennessee. 

Timmons, William T., age twenty-two ; residence, Columbus, Kentucky ; 
nativity, Tennessee; enlisted, November 4, 1863; mustered, November 4, 1863; 
deserted, February 11, 1865, Paducah, Kentucky. 

Tod, George A., age sixteen; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Pennsylvania; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862, as drummer; mustered, October 7, 1862; taken pris- 
oner, February, 4, 1864, Big Black River, Mississippi; mustered out, July 10, 
1865, Montgomery, Alabama. 

Trusty, Joseph S. M., age twenty-four; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Illi- 
nois; enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 2, 1864; transferred to 
Company B, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Vancleave, John S., age twenty-one; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Indi- 
ana; enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; died of disease, 
Alarch 28, 1863, Fort Pillow, Tennessee; buried in Mississippi River National 
Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee, section i, grave 78. 

Vancleave, Silas, age twenty-seven ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, Indiana ; 
enlisted, August 13, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 24, 
1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Vandevender, John, age twenty-eight; residence, W^ebster county; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted, August 13, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; taken prisoner, 
April 9, 1864, Pleasant Hill, Louisiana; mustered out, July 15, 1865, ]\Iont- 
gomery, Alabama. 

A'incent, Beth, age eighteen ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, Pennsylvania ; 
enlisted, August 20, 1862; mustered, October 29, 1862; mustered out, August 
24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Welchle, Jacob, age forty-four; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Germany; 
enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, August 24, 
1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

W^illiams, George P., age twenty-two; residence, Webster county; nativity, 
Indiana; enlisted, August 12, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, 
August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Williams, James B., age twenty-five; residence, Fort Dodge; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted, August 22, 1862, as third sergeant; mustered, October 7, 
1862; promoted, second sergeant. May 30, 1864; mustered out, August 24, 1865, 
Clinton, Iowa. 

Williams, Thomas J., age twenty; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Indiana; 



HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 107 

enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; discharged for disability, 
]\Iarch 13, 1864, Mound City, Illinois. 

Wilson, Joel B., age twenty-five; residence, Webster county; nativity. New 
York; enlisted, August 15, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; promoted, eighth 
corporal. May 30, 1864; fifth corporal, July 4, 1864; third corporal, December 
5, 1864; mustered out, August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Young, Ezra C, age twenty-four; residence, Webster county; nativity. New 
Jersey; enlisted, January 11, 1865; mustered, January 11, 1865; transferred to 
Company A, Eighth Infantry, July 29, 1865. 

Young, Lemuel L., age nineteen ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, New 
Jersey; enlisted, August 22, 1862; mustered, October 7, 1862; mustered out, 
August 24, 1865, Clinton, Iowa. 

Young, Levi G. C, age twenty-four; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity. New 
Jersey; enlisted, August 22, 1862 as fifth corporal; mustered, October 7, 1862; 
promoted, fourth corporal, October 6, 1862 ; third corporal, December 23, 1863 ; 
second corporal, ]\Iay 30, 1864; died of disease, -June 29, 1864, Fort Dodge, 
Iowa. 

COMPAXY A, ELEVENTH PENNSYLVANIA CAVALRY 

Webster county furnished a company of cavalry for service in the Union 
armies. This company was originally raised for Colonel Josiah Harlan's "Inde- 
pendent Cavalry," but afterward was sent east and became Company "A" of 
the Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry. While the company was considered an 
Iowa company, and was credited as such by the War Department on Iowa's 
quota, yet but little reference is made to it in the records of the adjutant general 
of Iowa. The commissions of the officers were, however, issued to the officers 
by the authorities of Iowa, at the request of the general commanding the divi- 
sion- in which the company was at the time of the organization of the regi- 
ment. At the completion of its organization the company numbered eighty- 
three men, rank and file. Soon after the organization of the cavalry company, 
the patriotic ladies of Fort Dodge decided to present the volunteers with a 
flag. They accordingly collected over $40 by subscription, and soon sent the 
money to Dubuque where the proper material of which to make the flag was 
purchased. 

The presentation took place September 13, 1861. The flag was about six 
and one-half feet in length and about five and one-half feet in width and was 
made of silk. The ceremony of presentation took place about four o'clock in 
the afternoon, and was held at the courthouse, in the presence of a large 
gathering of people from the town and county. The flag was presented by 
Miss Cruikshank, who on behalf of the ladies, spoke briefly, as follows: 

'Y^olunteers of the Iowa Light Cavalry. In behalf of the ladies of Fort 
Dodge, I present you this banner, the much loved emblem of our country's 
glory, for the maintenance of whose integrity and honor you have offered your 
lives. W^e grieve to part with you, yet are proud and happy that you have 
thus nobly responded to the call of duty. Our prayer is, that peace and har- 
mony may soon be restored to our loved country, and that you may return to 
us in safety. But should it be the fate of any of' you to fill a soldier's grave, 
far from home and friends, your memories will be sacredly and affectionately 

Vol. I--S 



108 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

cherished by those in whose behalf I address you. Xowhere can dnst to dust 
be consigned so well as where, 

"Heaven its dews shall shed 
On the martyred patriot's bed. 

"Take your banner, may it wave 
Proudly o'er the good and brave. 
When the spear in conflict shakes, 
And the strong lance quivering breaks, 
Guard it ! God will prosper you. 

"In the dark and trying hour. 

In the breaking forth of power. 

In the rush of steeds and men, 

May His right arm protect you then." 

The presentation speech was replied to on behalf of the company by J. H, 
Holloway. Woolsey Welles, on behalf of the Webster County Bible Society, 
then presented each of the officers with a Bible and each of the privates with 
a copy of the New Testament. George S. Ringland was then called upon and 
made a brief address. In the course of his address he referred to the hostility, 
which had been shown towards the company by certain parties in the city and 
county, and denounced the authors of this opposition as traitors. His remarks 
were greeted with applause. 

In the absence of official data concerning the history of this company, it has 
been necessary to consult other sources, and the editor has availed himself of 
an article published a number of years ago in the "Annals of Iowa," and written 
by Mr. George L. Cruikshank, the first sergeant of the company. Omitting 
some of the less important details, the history is herewith quoted as follows : 

"Company A, Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, was organized at Fort Dodge, 
Iowa, in August, 1861. When the news of the battle of Bull Run was received, 
a number of young men, who had been drilling during the spring and summer, . 
resolved to organize a company for the service, and messengers were sent up 
the Des Moines river as far as Spirit lake. September 2, 1861, the companv 
met at the courthouse in Fort Dodge, and, before electing its officers, was sworn 
into the service of the United States, by James R. Strow, justice of the peace. 
Franklin A. Stratton was elected captain ; G. S. Ringland, first lieutenant, and 
George W. Bassett, second lieutenant. The company went by stage to Cedar 
Falls, and thence by railroad to Dubuque, where, on September 21, 1861, it 
was mustered into the service of the United States by Captain Washington. 
It left Dubuque October 6th, and reached Washington, D. C, October 10, 1861. 
One of its members, Peter Bowers, was killed in a railroad accident near Lewis- 
ton, Pennsylvania, and was buried there. 

"At Washington, D. C, the company joined the regiment then known as 
Harlan's Independent Regiment of Light Cavalry. Colonel Josiah Harlan was 
a relative of Senator James Harlan of Iowa, and it was through his influence 
that Company A joined that regiment. Later, the secretary of war, finding he 

S.M.Sherman & Major Jonathan Hutchinson




HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 109 

had no authority to accept independent regiments, the name was changed to 
the Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, that state having the largest number of 
troops in the regiment. On the i6th of October it left its camp on Seventh 
street, and crossed the Potomac to Ball's Cross Roads, Virginia. In November 
it marched to Annapolis, Maryland, and thence proceeded to Fortress ]\Ionroe, 
Virginia, by steamer. Here stables were built for the horses, and the regiment 
was thoroughly drilled. * * * 

"On March 8, 1862, when the Vlerrimac sank the Cumberland, and the Con- 
gress was burned, the regiment was on picket duty on Newmarket Creek, and, 
on the morning of the 9th, saw the beginning of the fight between the ^Monitor 
and the IMerrimac. The company was under fire for the first time on the old 
battle-ground of Great Bethel, in March, 1862. On May 7th, the regiment was 
reviewed by President Lincoln. On May 15th, Companies A, E, G, H, and L 
were sent to Norfolk, Virginia, and soon after to Sufifolk. Company A was 
detached from the battalion and placed under the immediate orders of General 
Mansfield. Captain Stratton was a civil engineer and, under the direction of 
the general, made maps of all the routes between Sufifolk and the Black 
Water. * * * jj^ August, the part of the regiment that had been on the 
Peninsula with ^McClellan came to Sufifolk. On December 2, 1862, the com- 
pany was in the mounted charge at Beaver Dam Church, in Virginia, where the 
enemy was routed and a number of prisoners were taken. On January 30, 1863, 
Company A led the advance in the attack on the Deserted House, in which Gen- 
eral Prior was defeated. During the year at Sufifolk the command was con- 
stantly employed on scouting and out-post duty. In June, 1863, the regiment, 
with other troops, was sent by steamer to the White House, on the Pamun- 
key river, and from there to Hanover Court House, where a wagon train was 
captured. At South Anna Bridge a mounted charge was made, by Companies 
A and G, upon an earthwork, and the work captured. The object of the raid 
was to break up the railroad communications north to Richmond. On the expe- 
dition the rebel, General Fitzhugh Lee, was captured. 

"In July, a second expedition, under General Getty, was made against the 
Richmond and Manassas Railroad. The command returned to Norfolk and, 
on the 9th of August, a raid on the Petersburg and W^eldon Railroad was made. 
It was hard service, and but little was accomplished. In October, an expedi- 
tion went to [Matthew's Court House, to break up the contraband trade. Soon 
after. Company A was detached from the regiment and was placed on provost 
guard duty at Norfolk, Mrginia. In the following February, the company 
returned to the regiment, and was sent to Williamsburg and participated in 
General Wistar's famous expedition against Richmond. The expedition got 
no further than Bottom Bridge, on the Chickahominy. On the return of the 
regiment to Williamsburg, Company A was detached and stationed at 
Glouscester Point, opposite Yorktown. 

"During the winter, General Lee's army was encamped on the Rapidan river, 
and many of his men, especially cavalry, were furloughed for the purpose of 
recruiting their ranks. At dififerent times during the winter twenty-five of the 
Glouscester company were captured. In ]\Iarch, 1864, General Kilpatrick made 
a raid on Richmond. A part of his command, under Colonel Dalghren, became 
separated and, while attempting to make their way to our forces at Gloucester 



110 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

Point, were ambushed in the night. Colonel Dalghren was Jcilled, and the 
command scattered. A sergeant and five men made their way to our camp. 
A force sent out under ]\Iajor Wetherill found none of Dalghren's command 
but captured one man of the Fifth A'irginia Cavalry, and one from the Ninth 
Virginia Infantry. * * * 

"April 9, 1864, we crossed the York river and marched to Newport News, 
on the James river, took transports to Portsmouth, and were soon at Camp 
Getty, where the cavalry division, under General August V. Kautz, w'as organ- 
ized. It consisted of the Third New York, Fifth Pennsylvania, Eleventh 
Pennsylvania and the First District of Columbia regiments. The last were 
armed with the Henry repeating rifle, and two guns of the Eighth New York 
Battery were attached to the division. On Alay 5th, a beautiful spring morn- 
ing, the division moved out of Camp Getty for the last time. Everything in 
the way of baggage or incumbrance was left behind. * =i^ * The march 
was toward Petersburg, crossing the Black Water River near \\'akefield Station, 
on the Petersburg and Norfolk Railroad. The advance struck the Weldon 
Railroad at Stony Creek Station, and captured the guard. The next day Jar- 
ratt's Station, with a guard of seventy men, was captured. The railroad bridge 
across the Notoway was burned, and Companies A and D were sent to destroy 
a w^agon bridge to the left. From there the march was continued to City Point, 
which was in possession of General Butler and his colored troops. On May 
nth, w^e crossed the Appomattox at Bermuda Hundred. Raids, in which bridges 
were burned, railroads torn up, and much valuable property destroyed, were in 
constant progress, the division sometimes marching three hundred miles in 
six days. So constantly were we kept on the move that on the night of June ist 
when we reached the lines in front of Petersburg, the men took off their clothes 
to rest for the first time since leaving Camp Getty on ]\Iay 5th. The company 
had taken part in destroying a large amount of railroad track on the Danville, 
the South Side, and the Weldon Railroads. * * * ^ 

"At Pittsburg the regiment was dismounted and manned the breastworks, 
performing infantry duty. On the 9th of June, an attack was made on the 
Jerusalem plank roads. After some artillery fire, a charge was made and the 
lines carried. If General Gilmore had made any attempt to carry out his part, 
by an attack on the east line of the rebel works, Petersburg would have been 
captured. On the 15th of June, another attack was made on the lines of the 
Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad. The regiment was under severe fire for 
some time, but failed to carry the works. On the 21st of June General Kautz's 
Division again left camp along the breastworks and crossed the Appomattox to 
Zion's Church, where it joined the Third Division of General Sheridan's cavalry, 
under General J. H. Wilson, in a raid, the 'object of which was the destruction 
of the Danville Railroad. * * * This was accomplished. For thirty miles 
not a vestige of railroad remained. The extreme heat of the fire, added to that 
of the sun, prostrated a number of the men. After a march, in which the men 
and horses suflfered severely, the command reached the Petersburg and Weldon 
-Railroad at Stony Creek Station. Here it met a strong rebel force. After 
sharp skirmishing, it marched north to Reams' Station, where the rebel infan- 
try with bayonets, and our cavalry with sabers, came to a hand to hand con- 
test. By outflanking the rebels. General Kautz's Division reached our lines at 



HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 111 

Petersburg that night. The column was led by the Eleventh Pennsylvania Cav- 
alry, with Colonel Stratton in command, Company A taking the advance of the 
regiment. 

"General Wilson retreated south, and was four days in reaching our lines. 
After this the Eleventh Cavalry was on picket duty in Prince George county. 
It was with General Hancock in the attack on the Weldon Railroad, August 
22, 1864, where Company A had one man killed and one wounded. The picket 
dutv in Prince George county was hard service. On the 20th of September, 
1864, the members of the original Company A  except those who had re- 
enlisted  were mustered out of the service of the United States, at General 
Butler's headquarters, on the Appomattox. 

"On reorganizing the company, the officers were chosen from the veterans 
who had reenlisted, as follows: Captain, E. P. Ring; first lieutenant, William 
A. Barber; second lieutenant, Oscar S. ]\Iatthews. In October, 1864, they were 
with the cavalry in the actions north of the James river, where Lieutenant 
Barber was wounded and taken prisoner. He died in Richmond. The com- 
pany was with General Sheridan at Five Forks. In the cavalry charge on the 
enemy's line, Lieutenant Alatthews was killed. On the memorable 9th of April, 
the Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry was in the front line. Iowa was there rep- 
resented by the officers in command of the few remaining of grand old Company 
A. The regiment was mustered out of the service of the United States at Camp 
Cadwalader, Philadelphia, August 13, 1865. At that time there were but three 
of the original Iowa company left. Lieutenant Lucius L. Carrier, James Lindsay 
and Oscar S. Slosson." 

It will thus be seen that this splendid Iowa company, while assigned to and 
serving with a regiment from another state, nobly maintained the honorable 
record which was made by Iowa soldiers everywhere, throughout the great 
War of the Rebellion. Its first captain, Franklin A. Stratton, became major, 
lieutenant colonel, and colonel of the regiment, and brevet brigadier general of 
volunteers, at the close of the war.  He was twice wounded. Alany of the mem- 
bers of the company have since achieved success in various avocations, both as 
private citizens and in official positions. 

In the autumn of 1864, Governor Stone appointed Hon. Charles Aldrich as 
the Iowa commissioner to take the vote of the Iowa soldiers serving in the 
eastern army at the time President Lincoln was reelected. Among the troops 
visited by Air. Aldrich, while in the discharge of his official duty as election com- 
missioner, was Company A, of the Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, among whom 
were a number of his personal friends and acquaintances. The compiler deems 
it an appropriate closing of this sketch to quote a few brief extracts from the 
very interesting account which ]\Ir. Aldrich has given of his visit to the eastern 
army, upon that occasion : 

* * * "A company had gone from Fort Dodge, with many of the 
members of which I was acquainted, to the army of the Potomac. The theory 
in the formation of the regiment at the start was to make it a composite afifair, 
comprising one company from each of a certain number of states ; but the effort 
failed to materialize, the adjutant general not being authorized to organize such 
regiments ; and, when the command was fully mustered in, it was christened the 
Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry * * * I do not go into the history of 



112 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

this company to any farther extent, for the reason that an article elsewhere 
in this number details minutely the services of the company, and presents its full 
roster, showing the killed and wounded, as well as the few in the command at 
its muster out * * * It is but simple justice that this gallant command 
should be placed permanently in our records. I trust that its appearance in 
these pages will accomplish that purpose. 

'T reported to the secretary of state at Des Moines, where I received my 
instructions, with the poll books, blanks, etc. ; I also carried tickets provided by 
each of the political parties. The journey to Washington was without any 
special incident. I applied at the war department for permission to visit 
General Grant's army in my official capacity as 'Army Vote Commissioner,' 
and was referred to Major Henry Clay Wood, (who, I believe, if living, must 
be a gray-haired colonel by this time) an assistant adjutant general. I' found 
him an exceedingly afifable and pleasant gentleman. He gave me the neces- 
sary permit, limiting my stay to a certain number of days, five or six. I took 
the first steamer down the Potomac and up the James, and in due time landed 
on the point at the junction of the latter stream wnth the Appomattox. I was 
not long in finding Charles A. Sherman, of Fort Dodge, who had been pro- 
moted to first lieutenant and assistant quartermaster, and had been detailed 
for duty at the headquarters of General August V. Kautz, the distinguished 
cavalry leader. 'Charlie' was an old political and personal friend, and gave me 
a most cordial welcome to his tent and mess table. He wanted to vote, and 
proffered to go out with me the next day to the point where the men were 
stationed, doing picket duty, far to the front. 

'*We were up in the morning very early, leaving camp on horseback as soon 
as we had taken our breakfast. We crossed the James at Deep Bottom, on 
a pontoon bridge, and started bfi in the direction of Richmond, following the 
old road * * * We now struck into the 'Long Bridge road,' which led 
off through thick, grand old pine woods, toward Richmond. This was an 
ancient and very narrow road, which had never been used very much, or had 
been long abandoned. It was very crooked, and at many points nearly choked 
up with briars and brush. But it was lined with our pickets. These men were 
stationed at such frequent intervals that each could see the one next ahead. 
They were all mounted, sitting motionless and mute, with their carbines 
cocked, the very impersonation of alertness and vigilance. It certainly looked 
very much like war, to see these grim soldiers peering into the woods, as if in 
momentary expectation of seeing the approaching enemy. We finally reached 
the most advanced picket post, where we found Colonel Spear and a com- 
pany of cavalrymen. Lieutenant Sherman introduced me to the colonel, stating 
the errand upon which I had come. After a hearty and most cordial greet- 
ing, I waited a moment to hear what the Colonel might say. He spoke in an 
instant, about as follows : 

" 'Well, young man, if you are going to do anything here, you had better 
get about it  Cjuick. You don't know the peril you are in at this very moment ! 
That line of trees over yonder (across a meadow or pasture, and not more 
than forty or fifty rods away) is full of Johnnies, and they may open fire upon 
us at any minute!' 

" 'All right, colonel, here goes !' 

J.B. Williams Hon. Augustus Ceasar Dodge


HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 113 

"An election board was quickly appointed 'by the commissioner' from the 
soldiers, (as the law stipulated) and a cigar box fitted up for a ballot box. 
The men were brought in as quickly as possible, and in less time than one can 
imagine our votes were all in and canvassed. * * * i y^ras informed that 
we were within less than eight miles of Richmond, and that the spires of the 
city could be plainly seen from a point quite near by. I have always supposed 
that the election was held nearer the front, and in closer proximity to actual 
peril, than that organized by any other army vote commissioner. 

'* * * - We were not disposed to linger an instant, and Lieutenant 
Sherman and I mounted our horses and started for the rear. A young sec- 
ond lieutenant, by the name of Oscar Matthews, from Dickinson county, Iowa, 
returned with us. He was a pleasant, handsome boy. He had been in many 
battles, and the little black horse which he rode had not yet fully recovered 
from an ugly wound in the side, and had other scars besides. He was very 
attentive to us, and showed us many interesting objects along our route. At 
the battle of Five Forks, on April i, 1865, this, gallant young officer was killed, 
while leading his men in a charge. * * * " 

ROSTER COMPANY A, ELEVENTH PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY 

Franklin A. Stratton, captain; George S. Ringland, first lieutenant; George 
W. Bassett, second lieutenant. 

Barbor, William A., age eighteen; residence, Border Plains; enlisted, August 
18, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted corporal, July 7, 1864; first 
lieutenant, October 6, 1864; taken prisoner, October 7, 1864, Darbytown Road; 
died while a prisoner. 

Barclay, John J., age twenty-eight; residence, Fort Dodge; enlisted, August 
15, 1861, as first sergeant; promoted second lieutenant, August 20, 1862; first 
lieutenant, January 25, 1863; wounded and taken prisoner, June 29, 1864, Reams' 
Station, A^irginia; mustered out, September 28, 1864. 

Barnes, James R., age twenty-one ; residence. Border Plains ; enlisted, August 
18, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; killed, June 9, 1864, in front of 
Petersburg. 

Bassett, George W., age thirty-four; residence, Fort Dodge; appointed sec- 
ond lieutenant, August 7, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted first 
lieutenant, August 20, 1862; wounded, December, 1862, Franklin, Virginia; 
resigned, January 25, 1863. 

Beach, James A., age twenty-one ; residence. Border Plains ; enlisted, i\ugust 
24, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; died, January 30, 1863, of wounds 
received at Deserted House, \^irginia. 

Beyers, John F., age twenty-nine ; residence, Webster county ; nativity, New 
York; enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 12, 1864; no further record 
found. 

Binkley, George W., age eighteen ; residence. Border Plains ; enlisted, August 
T(^, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Binkley, Lafayette, age nineteen, residence. Border Plains ; enlisted, Sep- 
tember 15, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 
1864. 



114 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

Blake, Fletcher A., age twenty-six ; residence, Spirit Lake ; enlisted, August 
23, 1861, as second sergeant; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted first ser- 
geant, August 20, 1862; second lieutenant, January 25, 1863; resigned, Septem- 
ber 21, 1863. 

Bowers, Peter; residence, Fort Dodge; enlisted, August 26, 1861 ; mustered, 
September 21, 1861 ; killed, October 9, 1861, on railroad, near Lewiston, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Brown, John F., age twenty-one; residence, Waterloo; enlisted, September 
28, 1 86 1 ; mustered, September 28, 1861 ; mustered out, September 28, 1864. 

Burright, William H., age twenty ; residence. Fort Dodge ; enlisted, August 
15, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; taken prisoner, January 29, 1864; was 
in Andersonville ; no further record found. 

Carpenter, Daniel; residence. Border Plains; enlisted, August 20, 1861  
mustered, November 2, 1861 ; died of disease, December 24, i86r, Washington, 
D. C. 

Carpenter, William, age thirty-one; residence. Fort Dodge; enlisted, August 
17, 1861, as first corporal; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out. Sep- 
tember 20, 1864. 

Carrier, Lucius L., age eighteen; residence, Dubuque; enlisted, September 
28, 1861 ; mustered, September 28, 1861 ; promoted company commissary ser- 
geant, October 19, 1864; first sergeant, February 14, 1865; second lieutenant,. 
May, 1865; first lieutenant, August 13, 1865; mustered out, August 13, 1865. 
Camp Cadwalader, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 

Carter, Allen B., age twenty-one; residence. Fort Dodge; enlisted, August 
21, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Chandler, Starling, age twenty; residence, Waterloo; enlisted, September 
28, 1861 ; mustered, September 28, 1861 ; mustered out, September 28, 1864. 

Chase, Leander, age thirty; residence. Fort Dodge; enlisted, August 20, 
1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 21, 1864. 

Clark, Henry, age nineteen ; residence, Dubuque ; enlisted September 2^,. 
1861 ; mustered, September 23, 1861 ; mustered out, September 23, 1864. 

Cooper, Henry, age twenty-four ; residence, Jamestown ; enlisted, Septem- 
ber 9, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 21, 1864. 

Cragg, Harry P., age twenty-three; residence, Humboldt county; nativity, 
Pennsylvania; enlisted, December 29, 1863; mustered, January 16, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Company L, Fourth Cavalry. 

Crosby, Charles T., age twenty-seven; residence, Webster county; nativity,. 
New York; enlisted, January 2, 1864*; mustered, January 12, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Company I, Thirty-second Infantry. Company A, Eighth Infantry. 

Crosby, George H., age twenty; residence, Fort Dodge; enlisted, September 
3, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted sergeant, January, 1864: 
mustered out, September 21, 1864. 

Cruikshank, George L., age twenty-seven ; residence. Fort Dodge ; enlisted 
September 15, 1861, as fourth sergeant; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; pro- 
moted company quartermaster sergeant, 1862; first sergeant, September 21,. 
1863; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 



HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 115 

Daniels, George, age twenty-three ; residence, Spirit Lake ; enlisted, Sep- 
tember 7, 1861 ; mustered, September 20, 1861 ; no further record found. 

Davis, Abner T., age twenty-nine; residence, Humboldt county ; nativity, 
Michigan; enlisted, January i, 1864; mustered, January 16, 1864; transferred 
to Company L, Fourth Cavalry. 

Emery, Seth P., age twenty-five; residence, Spirit Lake; enlisted, September 
7, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted to hospital steward. 

Erwin, Allen, age forty; residence, Border Plains; enlisted, August 20, 
1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Evans, Hiram, age twenty-two; residence, Jamestown; enlisted, August 20, 
1861 ; mustered, September 20, 1861 ; deserted, July 3, 1863. 

Fairman, John W., age twenty-three; residence, Humboldt county; nativity, 
Canada; enlisted, January 4, 1864; mustered, January 16, 1864; transferred 
to Company L, Fourth Cavalry. 

Fitch, William S., age twenty-one; residence. Border Plains; enlisted, August 
23, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Fitzgerald, John, age nineteen; residence, Fort Dodge; enlisted, September 
10, 1861, as eighth corporal; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted company 
quartermaster sergeant, 1864; mustered out, September 20, 1864. Company K, 
First Infantry. (John H. Fitzgerald.) 

Forbes, James W., age twenty-two; residence, Cedar Falls; enlisted, Sep- 
tember 16, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 
20, 1864. 

Porbes, Thomas J., age twenty-six; residence, Dakotah City; enlisted, Sep- 
tember 2, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 
1864. 

Frantz, Jacob H., age twenty-three; residence, Dubuque; enlisted, September 
26, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 26, 1864. 

Frost, William, age twenty-four; residence, W^aterloo; enlisted, September 
28, 1861 ; mustered, September 28, 1861 ; mustered out, September 28, 1864. 

Fuller, Jared, age forty; residence. Fort Dodge; enlisted, August 22, i86r, 
as seventh corporal; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; discharged for disability, 
September, 1863. 

Galer, John, age twenty-one ; residence, Jamestown ; enlisted, September 9, 
1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted bugler, 1863; mustered out, 
September 21, 1864. 

Gardner, W'illiam V., age twenty; residence. Fort Dodge; enlisted, August 

20, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted corporal, 1864; mustered 
out, September 20, 1864. 

Hinton, James N., age twenty- seven ; residence, Humboldt county; nativity, 
Ohio; enlisted, January i, 1864; mustered, January 16, 1864; transferred to 
Company L, Fourth Cavalry. (James j\I. Hinton.) 

Hodge, Albert D., age twenty-five; residence, Estherville; enlisted, August 
22, i86i,'as sixth corporal; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; wounded, January 
30, 1863, Deserted House; mustered out on account of wound. 

Holloway, Joseph H., age twenty-three ; residence. Fort Dodge ; enlisted, 
August 15, 1861, as company quartermaster sergeant; mustered, September 

21, 1861 ; furloughed, November, 1863; died at home. 



116 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

Hood, James, age twenty-two ; residence, Jamestown ; enlisted, August 20, 
1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Horton, James, age twenty; residence, Fort Dodge; enlisted, September 3, 
1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted corporal in 1863; discharged 
September, 1863, to take lieutenant's commission in Eighth Iowa Cavalry; was 
adjutant of the regiment; killed, Stoneman's raid, south of Atlanta, Georgia; 
he was chosen to represent the cavalry service on the soldier's monument, Des 
Moines, Iowa. 

Hunter, James, age forty-two; residence, Waterloo; enlisted, October 11, 
1861, as farrier; mustered, October, 1861 ; mustered out, October 11, 1864. 

Jenkins, Andrew R., age twenty-five; residence, Webster county; nativity, 
Pennsylvania; enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 12, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Company I, Thirty-second Infantry. Company B, Eighth Infantry. 
(Andrew K. Jenkins.) 

Jenkins, Henry, age twenty-six ; residence, Estherville ; enlisted, August 22, 
1861, as second corporal; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted company 
commissary sergeant, 1864; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Jenkins, James S., age twenty-one; residence, Webster county; nativity, 
Pennsylvania; enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 12, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Company I, Thirty-second Infantry. Company B, Eighth Infantry. 

Jenkins, John S., age twenty-seven; residence, Webster county; nativity, 
Pennsylvania; enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 12, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Company I, Thirty-second Infantry. Company B, Eighth Infantry. 

Johns, William W., age twenty-six; residence. Border Plains; enlisted, 
August 17, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; died, August 31, 1862, hospital, 
Suffolk, Virginia. 

Johnson, Samuel O. H., age nineteen; residence, Border Plains; enlisted, 
August 17, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; committed suicide, while 
insane, June 14, 1862, near Fortress Monroe, Virginia. 

Jones, George W., age thirty-two; residence, Webster county; nativity. New 
York; enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 12, 1864; transferred to 
Company I, Thirty-second Infantry. Company B, Eighth Infantry. 

Kendall, Edward, age nineteen ; residence. Fort Dodge ; enlisted, August 28, 
1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; wounded, June. 1863, South Anna Bridge, 
Virginia; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Kennedy, Edward, age twenty-two ; residence. Fort Dodge ; enlisted, August 
23, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustei-ed out, September 20, 1864. 

Kimball, Jacob, age nineteen; residence. Cedar Falls; enHsted, September 16, 
t86i ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; died of disease, May, 1862, Camp Ham- 
ilton, Virginia. 

Largent, Joseph F., age twenty-two; residence, Dubuque; enlisted, September 
27, 1861; mustered, September 27, 1861 ; no further record found. 

Lindsay, James, age twenty-nine; residence. Fort Dodge; enlisted, August 
31, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, August 13. 1865, Camp 
Cadwalader, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

McKee, Joseph A., age twenty-three; residence. Border Plains; enlisted Aug- 
ust 17, 1861; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 



Miss Berry & Mrs. Burkholder

HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 117 

j\Iack, Charles D., age twenty-nine ; residence, Cedar Falls ; enlisted, September 
i6, 1861, as bugler; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 
1864. 

]\Ialcolm. Augustus H., age twenty-nine; residence, Jamestown; enlisted, 
August 20, 1861, as fourth corporal; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted 
sergeant, 1864; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Matthews, Oscar S., age twenty; residence. Spirit Lake; enlisted, August 22, 
1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted sergeant, September  , 1864; 
second lieutenant, October 4, 1864; killed, April i, 1865, Five Forks, Virginia. 

Aleagher, Thomas, age twenty-two ; residence. Fort Dodge ; enlisted, August 
21, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Mills, Andrew, age twenty-nine; residence, Jamestown; enlisted, August 20, 
1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; wounded and taken prisoner, June 29, 1864, 
Reams' Station, Virginia. Was in Andersonville. Died, March  , 1865, Wil- 
mington, North Carolina. 

Minton, Henry P., age twenty-three; residence, Border Plains; enlisted, August 
17, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted saddler, 1864; mustered out, 
September 20, 1864. 

Minton, John N., age twenty-one; residence. Border Plains; enlisted, August 
17, 1861, as fifth corporal; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; taken prisoner, 
August  , 1864; died in prison. 

Moon, James H., age thirty-three; residence, Humboldt county; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enhsted, January 16, 1864; mustered, January 16, 1864. (Annals of 
Iowa says: "James Moon came to the company from Iowa in 1862.") 

Moore, Jacob M., age eighteen; residence, Border Plains; enlisted, August 17, 
1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Morgan, Edward D., age twenty-nine; residence, Fort Dodge; enlisted, Sep- 
tember 2, 1861, as fifth sergeant ;. mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted 
second lieutenant, September 21, 1863; resigned, July 17, 1864. 

Morrell, Richard M., mustered, September 21, 1861 ; reduced to ranks from 
non-commissioned staff, June i, 1862; deserted, June 24, 1862. Was not an Iowa 
man. 

Olcutt, George, age twenty-three; residence, Fort Dodge; enlisted, September 
9, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Ostrander, William, Sr., residence, Annapolis, Md. ; enlisted, November 23, 
1861 ; no further record found. 

Peterson, John (veteran), age eighteen; residence, Fort Dodge; enlisted, 
August 31, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 
1864. 

Piatt, Henry A., age twenty-one; residence. Fort Dodge; enlisted, August 24, 
1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Price, George R., age twenty; residence, Dubuque; enlisted, September 24, 
1 86 1 ; mustered, September 24, 1861 ; mustered out, September 24, 1864. 

Ring, Euphronius P., age twenty; residence. Spirit Lake; enlisted, Septem- 
ber 6, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted sergeant, August 7, 1863; 
second lieutenant, July 7, 1864; captain, October 4, 1864; resigned, June 8, 1865. 

Ringland, George S., age twenty-seven; residence, Fort Dodge; appointed 



118 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

first lieutenant, August 15, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861; promoted cap- 
tain, August 20, 1862; mustered out, September 27, 1864. 

Rogers, George W. ; residence. Ball's Cross Roads, Virginia; enlisted, Novem- 
ber II, 1861 ; no further record found. 

Rogers, Samuel R., age twenty- four ; residence. Spirit Lake; enlisted, Sep- 
tember 7, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; killed, August 24, 1864, near 
Weldon railroad. 

Rood, Isaac P., age thirty-six; residence, Webster county; nativity. New 
York; enlisted, January 4, 1864; mustered, January 12, 1864; transferred to 
Company I, Thirty-second Infantry. Company B, Eighth Infantry. 

Ruter, \"alentine, age thirty-seven; residence, Humboldt county; nativity, 
Bavaria; enlisted, January 4, 1864; mustered, January 16, 1864; transferred to 
Company L, Fourth Cavalry. (Valentine Reuther or Ryder.) 

Shaftner, Francis, age twenty-two; residence, Fort Dodge; enlisted, August 
21, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Sherman, Charles A., age thirty-one ; residence, Fort Dodge ; enlisted, August 
21, 1861, as third sergeant; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted first lieu- 
tenant and regimental quartermaster, April 4, 1862; mustered out, April 3, 1865. 

Sherman, William, age eighteen ; residence, Jamestown ; enlisted, August 

20, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 
Simmons, Jason B., age twenty-five; residence. Fort Dodge; enlisted, August 

21, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; promoted corporal, 1864; mustered 
out, September 20, 1864. 

Slosson, Oscar, age twenty-eight ; residence, Jamestown ; enlisted, September 
9, 1861; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, August 13, 1865, Camp 
Cadwalader, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Smith, George, age twenty-six ; residence, Fort Dodge ; enlisted, August 
21, 1861, as third corporal; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; Avounded, June 25, 
1863, South Anna Bridge, Virginia; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Smith, George G., age twenty-five; residence, Estherville; enlisted, August 
23, 1861, as farrier; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; taken prisoner, August, 1864; 
was in Andersonville. 

Smith, W^illiam H., age twenty-six ; residence, Webster county ; nativity. 
New York; enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 12, 1864; transferred 
to Second Cavalry. (Unassigned.) 

Spring, Ichabod E., age twenty-one; residence, Border Plains; enlisted, 
August 17, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 
1864. 

Stratton, Franklin A., age twenty-nine; residence. Fort Dodge; appointed 
captain, August 15, 1861 ; mustered,- September 21, 1861 ; promoted major, Sep- 
tember I, 1862; lieutenant colonel, September 19, 1864; colonel, May, 1865; was 
brevetted brigadier general on muster out of service; twice wounded. 

Tanner, Charles, age twenty-five ; residence. Spirit Lake ; enlisted, x\ugust 22, 
1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Taylor, Daniel H., age twenty-eight; residence. Fort Dodge; enlisted, Sep- 
tember 2, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; wounded, January 30, 1863, 
Deserted House, Virginia ; lost an arm. 



HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 119 

Townsend, Albert H., age nineteen; residence, Border Plains; enlisted, August 
17, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Townsend, Henry, age twenty; residence. Border Plains; enlisted, August 
17, 1861 ; muste'red, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Townsend, James L., age twenty-two; residence, Border Plains; enlisted, 
August 17, 1861 ; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 20, 
1864. 

Trusty, Joseph S. ']\I., age twenty-four; residence, Webster county; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted, January 2, 1864; mustered, January 12, 1864; transferred to 
Company I, Thirty-second Infantry. Company B, Eighth Infantry. 

Underwood, Alonzo, age twenty; residence. Fort Dodge; enlisted, August 15, 
1861, as saddler; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out for disability, 
August 21, 1862. 

Vangaasbeck, Jesse L. ; enlisted, November 23, 1861 ; no further record found. 

Vincent, Webb, age nineteen ; residence. Fort Dodge ; enlisted, September 
3, 1861, as second bugler; mustered, September -21, 1861 ; promoted company 
quartermaster sergeant, 1863; mustered out, September 20, 1864. 

Vought, Lewis, age twenty-five; residence, Humboldt county; nativity, Wis- 
consin; enlisted, January i, 1864; mustered, January 16, 1864; transferred to 
Company L, Fourth Cavalry. 

Wall, William W. ; residence, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; enlisted, September 
30, 1861 ; no further record found. 

Welch, \\'illiam, age twenty-two; residence. Fort Dodge; enlisted, September 
12, 1861, as wagoner; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; mustered out, September 
20, 1864. 

Wentworth, Harrison H., age eighteen; residence, Webster county; nativity, 
Pennsylvania; enlisted, September 29, 1863; mustered, January 16, 1864; no 
further record found. 

Williams, Thomas ]., age twenty-one ; residence, Dubuque ; enlisted, Sep- 
tember 27, 1861 ; mustered, September 27, 1861 ; mustered out for disability. 

Wilson, Richard W. (veteran), residence. Fort Dodge; enlisted, August 27, 
1861; mustered, September 21, 1861 ; deserted; date and place not given. 

NORTHERN- BORDER BRIGADE 

Prior to the commencement of the great War of the Rebellion, troops belong- 
ing to the regular army of the United States had been located at the various 
military posts on the northern and western frontiers, for the purpose of 
restraining the Indians from committing depredations upon the pioneer settlers, 
whose homes were located upon those frontiers. The sudden emergency, with 
which the general government found itself confronted, rendered the withdrawal 
of the Federal troops from those military posts a matter of necessity. The 
regular army establishment, which then existed, constituted only a nucleus for the 
great army of volunteers which was being hastily organized, and every trained 
officer and soldier was needed at the front in the South to resist the hosts 
of armed traitors who had taken the field, and were threatening to dissolve the 
Union. 



120 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

The savage Indian tribes were quick to take advantage of the situation, and a 
series of depredations and massacres of whole families of the settlers ensued. 
For a time it seemed that there was no safety for any of those hardy pioneers, 
and that they must all be either driven from their homes or share the fate of 
those who had already met death at the hands of the Indians. A few of the 
settlers who lived nearest each other had the hardihood to remain in their 
homes and, by banding themselves together, and converting the largest cabin 
in their neighborhood into a temporary blockhouse, where they could meet for 
common defense when the danger signal was given, indulged the hope that 
they might be able to keep the Indians at bay until the troops, which they had 
been told were on the way, could come to their rescue. Nearly all of those who 
thus remained were killed or taken captives by the Indians. By far the greater 
number, however, adopted the wiser course of abandoning their homes, and 
seeking safety in the interior of the state until such time as the presence of 
troops would make it reasonably safe for them to return. j\Iost of the men, after 
placing their families in safety, enlisted and remained in the service of the 
state until peace was restored. 

It will thus be seen that the war, inaugurated by the Southern states, imposed 
an unusually heavy burden upon those Northern states which, in addition to 
furnishing their full quota of troops for the regiments which were being sent 
to the South, were compelled to protect their own frontiers from the incursions 
of hostile Indians. The governors of Iowa and Minnesota earnestly co-operated 
in their efiforts to give adequate protection to the helpless settlers on the borders 
of their respective states. In response to their calls, militia companies were 
promptly raised and, as rapidly as they could be armed and equipped, were 
dispatched to the frontier. There were no railroads, and the navigation of 
the jMissouri river, which was depended upon for forwarding supplies to Sioux 
City and points north of that place, was rendered exceedingly dangerous by 
the bands of lurking savages along its banks. Relief was therefore necessarily 
slow^ in reaching the imperiled settlers. 

The official records show that, prior to the organization of the Northern 
Border Brigade, the only regularly organized companies of Iowa troops which had 
been engaged in active service on the northern frontier, were Capt. Andrew J. 
Millard's Sioux City Cavalry Company, and Companies A, B and C, of the 
Fourteenth Regiment of Iowa Volunteer Infantry. The Sioux City Cavalry 
Company, having been raised nearest the scene of the Indian troubles, was the 
first to take the field. It was composed of men inured to the hardships of 
frontier life, and generally acquainted with the Indian methods of warfare. The 
officers and men of this company rendered long, arduous and heroic service on 
the northern border and in the Indian Territory, first as an independent com- 
pany, and subsequently as a part of the Seventh Iowa Cavalry, to which regi- 
ment it was transferred. 

Companies A, B and C, of the Fourteenth Iowa Infantry, were detached 
from the regiment verv soon after it was mustered into the service of the 
United States, and were ordered to proceed to Fort Randall, Dakotah Territory, 
for the purpose of relieving the battalion of United States troops, which com- 
posed the garrison at that fort. These three infantry companies marched from 
their camp near Iowa City, by way of Des Moines, to Council Bluffs and Sioux 



HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 121 

City, Iowa, to Fort Randall, a distance of 550 miles, in thirty-five days. They 
were subsequently permanently detached from the Fourteenth Iowa and became 
the Forty-first Iowa Infantry Battalion, and were assigned to service on the 
frontier. Upon the organization of the Seventh Iowa Cavalry, these companies 
were transferred to that regiment, which constituted a part of the command ot 
General Sully, and remained in the Northwest, engaged in active service against 
the Indians, until the close of the war. 

The foregoing statement, as to the conditions which existed on the northern 
border and the part taken by Iowa troops in the early part of the war with the 
Indians, has been made as an introduction to the history which follows. It 
became evident that the Indians could not be completely subdued by the forces 
then operating against them, and that adequate protection could not be furnished 
to the settlers, without the establishment of a regularly organized body of state 
troops and the erection of a chain of defenses along the Iowa frontier. In his 
official report. Adjutant General Baker, after making a preliminary statement 
of the condition then existing, quotes the reports' made to the governor, and his 
orders and instructions, with reference to the formation of the Northern Border 
Brigade. The statement, copies of some of the reports in full, and of others 
in part, are here given as follows : 

''The Indian outbreak in Minnesota in the latter part of August and in 
September, 1862, as well as the threatening attitude of the Indians on our own 
frontier, having alarmed our citizens on the border, and numerous appeals for 
aid and protection being made by them to the governor, his excellency, on the 13th 
of September, 1862, appointed S. R. Ingham, Esquire, of Des Moines, as his 
agent to proceed to the exposed frontier of the state, to give the matter his 
personal and immediate attention. His reports show his prompt, energetic and 
able performance of his duty."  Adjutant General. 

" 'To His Excellency, S. J. Kirkwood, Governor of Iowa, 

Sir : Under your instructions, placed in my hands, August 29, 1862, of which 
the following is a copy : 

August 29, 1862. 
S. R. Ingham, Esquire, 

Sir: I am informed there is probable danger of an attack by hostile Indians, 
on the inhabitants of the northwestern portion of our state. Arms and powder 
will be sent to you at Fort Dodge, lead and caps will be sent with you. I hand 
you an order on the auditor of state for one thousand dollars. You will please 
proceed at once to Fort Dodge, and from there to such other points as you may 
deem proper. Use the arms, ammunition and money placed at your disposal, 
in such manner as your judgment may dictate as best to promote the object in 
view, to-wit: the protection of the inhabitants of the frontier. It would be 
well to communicate with Captain Alillard, commanding the company of 
mounted men raised for United States service at Sioux City. 

Place any men you may deem it advisable to raise under his command. Use 
your discretion in all things, and exercise any power I could exercise if I were 
present, according to your best discretion. Please report to me in writing. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Samuel ]. Kirkwood. 



122 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

" T have the honor to report that, in compHance therewith, I at once proceeded 
to the northern border of our state, to ascertain the extent of the supposed 
difficuhies, and to do the needful for the protection of our frontier settlements, 
should circumstances warrant or demand. I visited Dickinson, Emmet, Palo 
Alto, Kossuth, Humboldt and Webster counties; found many of the inhabitants 
in a high state of excitement, and laboring under a constant fear of an attack by 
Indians. Quite a number of families were leaving their homes and moving into 
the more thickly settled portions of the state. This feeling, however, seemed 
to be more intense and to run higher in the more inland and remote counties from 
the border than in the border counties themselves. In Emmet and Kossuth, both 
border counties, I had the settlers called together in order that I might learn from 
them their views and wishes as to what ought to be done for their safety, or 
rather what was necessary to satisfy and quiet their fears and apprehensions. 
They expressed themselves freely and were very temperate in their demands. 
They said all they wanted or deemed necessary for the protection of the northern 
border was a small force of mounted men, stationed on the east and west forks 
of the Des jVIoines river, to act in concert with the United States troops, then 
stationed at Spirit Lake ; but that this force must be made up of men, such as 
they could choose from amongst themselves, who were familiar with the country 
and had been engaged in hunting and trapping for years, and were more or less 
familiar with the habits and customs of the Indians, one of which men would be 
worth half a dozen such as the state had sent up there on one or two former 
occasions. In a small force of this kind they would have confidence, but would 
not feel safe with a much larger force of young and inexperienced men, such 
as are usually raised in the more central portions of the state. 

" T at once authorized a company to be raised in Emmet, Kossuth, Palo Alto 
and Humboldt counties. Within five days forty men were enlisted ; held an 
election for officers, were mustered in, furnished with arms and ammunition, and 
placed on duty, twenty at Chain Lake, and twenty at Estherville, on the west 
fork of the Des Moines. I authorized them to fill up the company to eighty 
men, if necessity should demand such an addition to the force. At Spirit Lake, 
in Dickinson county, I found some forty men stationed, under command of Lieu- 
tenant Sawyers, of Captain jMillard's Company, Sioux City Cavalry, in the 
United States service. From the best information I could obtain, I deemed this 
a sufficient force and therefore took no action to increase the protection at this 
point, further than to furnish the settlers with thirty stand of arms, and a small 
amount of ammunition, for which I took bond as hereinafter stated. Not being 
able to see Captain Millard, he being at Sioux City, I did not place the company 
raised under his command, but simply made an arrangement with Lieutenant 
Sawyers, by which the forces were to act together until such time as I should be 
able to see the captain * * * ' " 

The remainder of Mr. Ingham's report relates mainly to the further distri- 
bution of arms and ammunition to responsible men among the settlers, to be 
distributed for use only in case of emergency, when it might become necessary 
for all who were capable of bearing arms to unite their strength for the com- 
mon defense, and act in conjunction with the regularly organized companies who 
were constantly on duty. He concludes his report as follows : 

"Having done all that seemed necessary for the protection of the settlers of 

HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 123 

the more exposed of the northern border counties, I returned to Fort Dodge on 
the 8th day of September, intending to proceed at once to Sioux City, and make 
all necessary arrangements for the protection of the settlements on the north- 
western border. At that point I was informed that the legislature, then in 
extra session, had passed a bill providing for the raising of troops for the pro- 
tection of our borders against hostile Indians. I therefore deemed it best to 
report to you for further instructions, and did so report on the loth of 
September." 

Mr. Ingham was given full power and authority to put into effect the law 
authorizing the organization of the Northern Border Brigade. The good judg- 
ment which he had exercised in forming the companies already raised, and in the 
entire discharge of his duty under his former commission from the governor, 
fully justified the confidence reposed in him. He at once proceeded to organize 
and muster into the service the companies named in the order, at the places 
designated, as follows: Webster City, Fort Dodge, Denison and Sioux City. 
He also ordered the construction of blockhouses and stockades at Correctionville, 
Cherokee. Peterson, Estherville and Chain Lakes. At Spirit Lake a strong 
stockade had already been constructed. These places formed the nucleus of the 
principal settlements on the northwestern border of the state. With the com- 
pletion of these defenses, and their occupation by the four companies last organ- 
ized, and the two previously stationed at Chain Lakes and Estherville, a force 
of 250 mounted men, well armed and equipped, were ready at all times to 
cooperate with the cavalry forces under General Sully, then operating against 
the hostile tribes of Indians beyond the border. The wisdom of the action of 
the governor, in asking for the necessary legislation to enable him to place an 
adequate force upon the border, .was demonstrated by the security subse- 
quently afforded to the settlers. Most of those who had fled in terror from their 
homes, returned and resumed the cultivation of their farms, with the knowledge 
that, in case of attack by the Indians, there were places of refuge provided for 
them. Mr. Ingham, in closing his official report, says: "From information in 
my possession, I am entirely satisfied that it will be necessary to keep this entire 
force on duty after the completion of the blockhouses and stockades on which 
they are now engaged." 

While the danger from attack was not so great as it had been before these 
precautions were taken, the fact remained that the number of Indian warriors 
then engaged in hostilities far exceeded the number of troops under the com- 
mand of General Sully. In spite of the disparity in numbers, however, the 
splendid troops, under the command of that brave and intrepid general, had 
defeated the Indians in several pitched battles, and had driven them far beyond the 
frontier. The danger was that other Indian tribes, which had thus far refused to 
join those actively hostile, might be induced to go upon the war path, and, with 
greatly increased numbers, succeed in compelling General Sully's forces to fall 
back to the settlements on the frontier. Keeping in mind the horrible events 
of the recent past, there was still much to justify the feeling of anxiety which 
pervaded the minds of both settlers and soldiers in those border counties of 
Iowa. To show how well this feeling was justified, the following extract from 
the report of George L. Davenport, Esquire, who had been sent by Governor 
Kirkwood to confer with Governor Ramsey, of Minnesota, is here given: 

Vol. 19 



124 " HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

" * * * Upon my arrival at St. Paul, I called upon Governor Ramsey, 
who gave me all the information in his power. He informed me that the out- 
break of the Sioux Indians is of the most serious character, and the massacre 
for men, women and children of the frontier settlements, the largest known in the 
history of the country. Nearly six hundred persons are known to be killed, and 
over one hundred women and children are in the hands of the savages as pris- 
oners. The Indians are very bold and defiant, repeatedly attacking the forts and 
the troops sent out against them. They have plundered many stores and farm 
houses, and have driven oflf a very large number of cattle and horses. The 
Indians continue to attack the settlements almost every week, keeping up a 
constant alarm among the people. It is estimated that over five thousand persons 
have left their homes and all of their property, causing immense loss and sufifer- 
ing. Governor Ramsey informs me that he will have, in a short time, about four 
thousand troops to operate against the Indians, one thousand of which will be 
cavalry, as soon as horses can be obtained * * * 

'Tt is proposed to erect stockade forts, at short distances apart, along a 
frontier of two hundred miles, and garrison them with forty or fifty men each. 
This, it is supposed, will induce many to return to their farms and feel that they 
are protected, and, in case of alarm, have a place to fly to. I am mvich alarmed 
in regard to the safety of the settlements on the northwestern border of our state. 
I think they are in imminent danger of an attack at any moment, and will be 
in constant danger and alarm during the coming winter. As the Indians are 
driven back from the eastern part of Minnesota, they will fall back towards the 
Missouri slope, and will make inroads upon our Iowa settlements * * * 

The foregoing official report, showing the terrible calamity that had come 
upon the hapless settlers in Minnesota, afiforded full justification for the prompt 
action taken by the Iowa legislature and Governor Kirkwood. Had such action 
been delayed, the depopulation of those border counties would have resulted, 
either on account of the actual warfare which would have been waged by the 
Indians, or the fear of it, which would have caused all the settlers to have 
abandoned their homes and removed to the interior of the state. 

During the winter, and a part of the summer of 1863, the work of erecting 
defenses at the dififerent places indicated in the order was vigorously prosecuted. 
The headquarters of the brigade were subsequently established at Estherville, 
and from that post details were made for the other posts along the line of the 
frontier. Near the last of September, 1863, (owing to the defeat of the hostile 
tribes of Indians on the 3d and 4th of that month, by the forces under the com- 
mand of General Alfred Sully, at the hard fought battle of White Stone Elill, in 
which the Sixth and Seventh Iowa Regiments of Cavalry greatly distinguished 
themselves) it became evident that the danger of further attacks upon the set- 
tlers had greatly diminished, and it was deemed safe to disband the Northern 
Border Brigade, and to substitute a smaller force in its stead. This force con- 
sisted of Captain Ingham's Company A, which, after the Northern Brigade had 
been mustered out, had been remustered for this particular service. It was soon 
relieved by United States troops and was then mustered out of the service. The 
hostile Indians had been driven far to the north by General Sully's troops, and the 
settlers upon the frontier were comparatively free from the dangers which had 
formerly threatened them. With a sufficient force of United States troops. 



HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 125 

constantly on duty at the posts where fortifications had been erected by the 
state of Iowa, and the country to the north thoroughly patrolled by General 
Sully's cavalry scouts, the danger of the Indians committing depredations upon 
the homes of the settlers was reduced to the minimum. 

While the records do not show that the state troops composing the Northern 
Border Brigade were ever engaged in serious conflicts with the Indians, they do 
show that they performed most important service and endured great hard- 
ships. During the time they were engaged in constructing the fortifications 
along the line of the frontier, they were in constant danger. Had the Indians 
proved too strong to be overcome by the troops under General Sully's command, 
that officer would have jetreated to the state line and united his forces with 
those of the state. Upon more than one occasion before the works were com- 
pleted, such a contingency semed likely to occur. It is therefore evident that 
those hardy sons of Iowa, who braved the rigors of the northern winters and the 
risk of the fierce conflict with the hostile tribes of Indians who had murdered 
so many of the hapless settlers on the frontier, are entitled to an honored place 
in the history of their country's defenders. The descendants of those hardy 
pioneers, whose families and homes were saved from destruction, will ever 
hold in grateful remembrance the men who came to the rescue of their ancestors. 

ROSTER COMPANY B, NORTHERN BORDER BRIGADE 

William Williams, captain; John M. Hefley, first lieutenant; Jasper N. Bell, 
second lieutenant. 

Allen, Samuel F., age thirty-one; residence, Webster county; nativity, Indi- 
ana; enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered 
out, August 26, 1863. 

Bass, James, age thirty-two ; residence, Webster county ; nativity. North 
Carolina; enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; promoted 
fourth corporal; mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Bass, Jesse, age forty- four ; residence, Mineral Ridge ; nativity, North Caro- 
lina; enlisted, September 24, 1862, as second corporal; mustered, September 24, 
1862; mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Beem, Wickliffe C, age twenty-two; residence, Border Plains; nativity, Ohio; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 

Bell, Jasper N., age twenty-two; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Iowa; 
appointed second lieutenant, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; 
mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Blaine, William H., age twenty-three; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered 
out, August 26, 1863. 

Booker, Leander, age twenty-eight ; residence, Boone county ; nativity, Ten- 
nessee ; enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered 
out, August 26, 1863. 

Buck, William, age twenty-five; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 



126 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

Coleman, Timothy, age twenty -one; residence, Fort Dodge; nativity, Ireland; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 

Conlee, Smith T., age eighteen; residence, Fort Dodge; nativity, Illinois; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 

Crouse, Edward, age thirty-three ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, North 
Carolina ; enlisted, September 24, 1862 ; mustered, September 24, 1862 ; mustered 
24, 1862; mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Crouse, Irwin, age twenty- four; residence, Fort Dodge; nativity. North 
Carolina; enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered 
out, August 26, 1863. 

Crouse, Jacob, age thirty-six ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, North Caro- 
lina; enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; promoted 
farrier; mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Denslow, B. F., age thirty-six ; residence, Ellington ; nativity, Indiana ; en- 
listed, September 24, 1862, as second sergeant; mustered, September 24, 1862; 
mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Eslick, John D., age nineteen; residence, Homer; nativity, Missouri; enlisted, 
September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, August 26, 

1863. 

Fitch, Edward, age twenty-one; residence. Homer; nativity, Pennsylvania; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 

Flaherty, James, age twenty-five ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, Maryland ; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 

Harper, John, age thirty-two ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, Scotland ; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 

Heffner, George, age twenty-nine ; residence. Border Plains ; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted, September 24, 1862, as fourth sergeant; mustered, September 
24, 1862; mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Hefley, John M., age thirty-five ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania ; appointed first lieutenant, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 
1862; mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Hoisington, Jesse, age thirty-eight ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, Ohio ; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 

Holt, J. M., age thirty-three ; residence, Webster county ; nativity, Tennessee ; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862, as farrier; mustered, September 24, 1862; reduced 
to ranks; mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Hubbard, John N., age thirty-five; residence, Webster county; nativity, Illi- 
nois; enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 

Humphreys, James A., age thirty-eight; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, 
Connecticut; enlisted, September 24, 1862, as wagoner; mustered, September 24, 
1862; promoted quartermaster sergeant; mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Stroughton & Bennett

HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 127 

Jenkins, Andrew K., age twenty-four ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, Penn- 
sylvania; enlisted, September 24, 1862, as bugler; mustered, September 24. 1862; 
mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Jenkins, James S., age twenty; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania; enlisted, September 24, 1862, as first sergeant; mustered, September 24, 
1862; mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Kaylor, Thomas J., age twenty-five; residence, Fort Dodge; nativity, Indiana; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 

Landreth, Matthew, age twenty-two ; residence, Homer ; nativity, Indiana ; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862, as fourth corporal; mustered, September 24, 1862; 
reduced to ranks; mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Landreth, Thomas, age forty-three; residence, Homer; nativity, X'irginia; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 

Landreth, William R., age twenty-three; residence. Homer; nativity, Indi- 
ana; enlisted. September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 

Landreth, Zachariah, age twenty-one; residence, Homer; nativity, Missouri; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 

Long, Eli, age twenty-one; residence Homer; nativity, Kentucky; enlisted, 
September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, August 26, 
1863.

Lowe, Emanuel E., age twenty-two; residence, Webster county; nativity, 
Illinois; enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered 
out, August 26, 1863. 

McCosker, Charles, age forty-two ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, Ireland ; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 

McDonough, Martin, age twenty-four; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Ire- 
land; enlisted. September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; discharged 
for disability, October 15, 1862. 

McGuire, Blythe, age twenty-seven; residence. Homer; nativity, Alissouri; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 

Morrissey, Daniel, age twenty-six; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Ireland; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862, as third corporal; mustered, September 24. 1862; 
mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Nicholson, Alfred J., age twenty; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity. Ireland; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, 
August 26, 1863. 

Payne, Jonathan W., age twenty-seven ; residence, Webster county ; nativity, 
Tennessee; enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mus- 
tered out, August 26, 1863. 

Phipps, Luther, age eighteen ; residence, Webster City ; nativity, Massa- 
chusetts; enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered 
out, August 26, 1863. 



128 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

Pierce, Francis M., age nineteen; residence, Homer; nativity, Missouri 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out 
August 26, 1863. 

Powers, Walter, age twenty; residence. Fort Dodge; nativity, Maine 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out 
August 26, 1863. 

Richey, Gasper A., age twenty; residence, Webster county; nativity, Ohio 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out 
August 26, 1863. 

Starr, Peter, age forty-two ; residence. Boone county ; nativity, Sweden 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out 
August 26, 1863. 

Weeks, Arthur, age eighteen ; residence, Webster county ; nativitv. Ohio 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out 
August 26, 1863. 

White, James P., age twenty-five ; residence, Fort Dodge ; nativity, Maine 
enlisted. September 24, 1862, as third sergeant; mustered, September 24, 1862 
mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Williams, William, age sixty-four ; residence. Fort Dodge ; nativity, Pennsyl- 
vania ; appointed captain, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; 
mustered out, August 26, 1863. 

Wright, Nathan, age twenty; residence. Homer; nativity, Missouri; enlisted,' 
September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out, September 
26, 1863.

Wright, William, age twenty-two; residence, Homer; nativity, Missouri; 
enlisted, September 24, 1862; mustered, September 24, 1862; mustered out,, 
August 26, 1863. 

APOSTROPHE TO THE BLUE AND THE GRAY 

In this hour of sacred eulogy of our dead, no noble soul will deny a slight 
chaplet to those who fell on the other side. Their cause is lost forever; indeed, 
the genius of liberty and the spirit of modern civilization foredoomed it to 
defeat. Never braver men stood embattled with a losing cause, and their ruined 
homes, and broken fortunes, and the last trenches of defeat and disaster, filled 
with the best blood of their race, attest their sincerity and devotion. But cour- 
age and devotion are never wholly lost ; and when the perfect union of these 
people shall have come,  the union of which our fathers dreamed, and for 
which their sons died,  then the lustrous courage of our foemen shall become 
part of the common history of our common race and common blood. I lift 
my soul into a vision of a noble future, when strife and clamor between the 
sections shall be hushed, forever, and one people, with one flag, and one des- 
tiny, shall teach only the gospel of peace and good will, from our northern bound- 
ary to where the southern cross blazes above the southern ocean. Enlarged 
patriotism, and enlightened statesmanship, should hasten the day. Its dawn is 
almost here. Let the loyalty and courage of the blue and the courage and devo- 
tion of the gray be given as the most patriotic duty of the hour toward absolute 
reconciliation. It is as holy a cause as was the war for the unity of these states. 
The blue and the gray sleep in peace, side by side, on every hill top, and in every 



HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 129 

valley of all the battlefields of the Republic ; over them bend these same heavens, 
above them shine the same stars, fixed, immutable; over them sweeps the same 
flagr. free and immortal. Fallen comrades of the blue ! Fallen foemen of the 
gray ! Ye have pitched your tents together in the Eternal Bivouac beyond the 
stars, where ye shall camp forever, in that mysterious and unknown silence that 
shall be broken only by the reveille of the life immortal.  Captain J. A. O. 
Yeoman, Memorial Address, Omaha, Nebraska, May 30, 1891. 

On March 9. 1864. the Thirty-second Iowa, with its brigade and division, 
embarked on transports and proceeded to the mouth of Red river. There were 
nineteen transports conveying Gen. A. J. Smith's Division of the Sixteenth Corps, 
consisting of about ten thousand infantry and three batteries of artillery. A 
fleet of eleven gunboats accompanied the transports from \'icksburg and at the 
mouth of the Red river they were joined by several larger gunboats. This formid- 
able naval force was under the command of Admiral Porter, of the United States 
navv. who was to act in conjunction with the land forces under command of 
]\Iajor General Banks, on the Red river expedition. The fleet of gunboats and 
transports entered the cut-off, into which the Red river empties, and into which 
the Atchafalaya flows, on IMarch 12th, and passed down the latter river to Sims- 
port, where the troops disembarked. The regiment was now a part of the Second 
Brigade of the Third Division, Sixteenth Army Corps. The troops composing 
the brigade were the Fourteenth, Twenty-seventh and Thirty-second Regiments 
of Iowa Infantrv, the Twenty-fourth Missouri Infantry and the Third Indiana 
Battery. Col. William T. Shaw of the Fovirteenth Iowa, the senior ofiicer in rank, 
was in command of the brigade. 

At 6:00 A. M. on the morning of March 14, 1864, the Second Brigade was 
ordered to take the advance, and marched rapidly in the direction of Fort De 
Russy, the first objective point of the expedition. The march was conducted with 
great vigor, and late in the afternoon, the brigade reached the village of Marks- 
ville, two and one-half miles from the fort, where Colonel Shaw was ordered to 
detach one regiment of his brigade to act as rear guard of the division. The 
Twenty-seventh Iowa, was detailed for that duty. The other regiments of the 
brigade, and the battery, then moved forward and soon came within range of 
the enemy's guns in Fort De Russy. In his official report Colonel Shaw describes 
the skirmish fighting which occurred prior to the time the order was given for a 
general assault upon the fort. Colonel Scott was ordered to take position with the 
Thirtv-second Iowa, on the right of the brigade, in support of the skirmishers of 
the Fourteenth Iowa and the Third Indiana Battery. The order was promptly 
obeyed and the position gained with but slight loss. The battery was returning the 
fire of the enemy's guns from the fort, and the Fourteenth and Thirty-second Iowa 
had taken possession of a line of rifle-pits from which the enemy's skirmishers 
had been driven, and from which an incessant musketry fire was kept up, making 
it difficult for the enemy's gunners to serve their artillery. This preliminary 
skirmishing was still in progress when Colonel Gilbert arrived with the Twenty- 
seventh Iowa, and relieved the skirmishers of the Fourteenth Iowa who had 
exhausted their ammunition. General Mov.'er, who had been directing the move- 
ments of the First Brigade, now joined the Second Brigade and placing himself 
at the head of the Twenty-fourth ]Missouri, ordered an immediate assault upon 
the fort. All the regiments advanced promptly when the command was given. 



130 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

The Twenty-fourth Missouri, led by General Mower in person, had the honor of 
being the first regiment of the Second Brigade to plant its colors on the walls of the 
fort ; the advance was, however, so nearly simultaneous with the whole brigade 
that the diiTerent regiments reached the fort at nearly the same time. At 6 :oo 
P. M. the fort, with the rebel troops which composed its garrison, was in pos- 
session of the Union troops. Near the close of his official report Colonel Shaw 
says, in part, "My command had in twelve hours marched twenty-eight miles, 
fought two hours, and assisted in storming and capturing Fort De Russy." He 
commends the officers and men of the battery and of each of the regiments of his 
brigade for the promptness and good order with which they went into action, 
after the long and fatiguing march, and closes by saying, "I am proud to say 
that not a single instance came under my observation of any officer or soldier 
attempting to shun danger or duty during the engagement, and my opportunity was 
good for observing each regiment as it came under fire." 

The official report of Colonel Scott as to the part taken by his regiment in the 
action at Fort De Russy, coincides with that of the brigade commander. Limi- 
tation of space prevents its insertion in this sketch. He commends the good con- 
duct of the officers and men of the Thirty-second Iowa, and at the close of his 
report says, "With devout thankfulness that the list is so short, 1 append state- 
ment of casualties." It seems almost incredible that the regiment should have 
gone through the engagement without having suffered greater loss than shown 
in Colonel Scott's report, but, as shown by the official reports of Gen. A. J. 
Smith, the entire loss of the two brigades engaged in the capture of the fort 
was but three killed and thirty-five wounded, while the loss of the Thirty-second 
Iowa was one man killed and two severely wounded. The rebel garrison at 
Fort De Russy consisted of but 350 men, and it must be admitted that, considering 
the great disparity between their number and that of the attacking force, they 
made a gallant defense before surrendering the fort. The incessant fire of the 
batteries and musketry of the two brigades kept down the fire of the rebels to 
such an extent as to prevent heavy loss on the part of the Union troops. 

The prompt and energetic movement of General Smith's command had inau- 
gurated the Red river campaign with an importat victory. Had General Smith 
then been placed in command of all the troops engaged in the expedition, there 
is every reason to believe that the disasters which ensued might have been pre- 
vented. After dismantling Fort De Russy and effectually destroying it as a 
work of defense, the troops moved forward to Alexandria, Louisiana, where, in 
obedience to his order. General Smith awaited the arrival of General Banks with 
the other troops under his command. The following extracts from the report 
of Col. John Scott will show the movements of the Thirty-second Iowa, from the 
date of its arrival at Alexandria to the close of the battle of Pleasant Hill, on 
April 9, 1864: 

"Went into camp near the town on March i6th, and remained until the morn- 
ing of the 28th, when we started by the Bayou Rapids road, with rations for three 
days, to meet the transport at Bayou Cotile Landing, above the rapids. Marched 
eighteen miles on the 28th and nine miles on the 29th, reaching the landing at 
one o'clock P. M., where we remained until April 2d, when we again embarked 
on transport, and, on the next day, landed at Grand Ecore. On April ist had bat- 
talion drill, with all the companies together for the first time since we left 

Cheney & Colburn

HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 131 

Dubuque in November, 1862. Remained in camp on the bank of Red river, one 
mile above Grand Ecore, until the morning of April 7th, from which date until 
the night of the 9th, the following official reports will show our movements and 
attendant incidents. The distance from Grand Ecore to battlefield near Pleasant 
Hill is about thirty-seven miles. The total number of the regiment when it 
started on the march on April 7th, was four hundred sixty-nine, field, staff 
and line. We entered the battle with about four hundred twenty rifled mus- 
kets. * * * On the morning of April 7th, moving from Grand Ecore, accord- 
ing to the order of march for that day, my regiment was in the rear of the 
brigade. Everything progressed satisfactorily until about two o'clock P. M., when 
we encountered the headquarters train of Major General Banks, entirely block- 
ading the way. * * * In this manner two brigades, including artillery and 
trains, were delayed more than four hours, in the midst of a heavy rain storm. 
Finally the troops passed by in an effort to reach the assigned camping ground 
before dark, but failed, and camped two miles short of the proper position ; 
subsistence and camp equippage did not come up until the night was far advanced. 
On the 8th we moved forward twenty miles, and camped near Pleasant Hill at 
sunset. For several hours had heard heavy artillery firing some miles in advance. 
During the night our camp was overrun with stragglers from the front, who cir- 
culated the wildest stories of disaster and loss of men, artillery and trains. On 
the morning of the 9th these w^ere repeated 'and exaggerated. The road was seen 
filled with teams crowding to the rear. Evidences of past defeat and prospective 
retreat were everywhere visible. These w^ere the moral surroundings as my 
command was moved to the extreme front, and took position in line. of battle 
at ten o'clock A. M., relieving a portion of the Nineteenth Corps. My position 
in line on the extreme left of the brigade was supported on the right by the Twenty- 
seventh Iowa Infantry, the other regiments of the brigade extending to the right. 
My left, for some reason still unknown to me, was without support, though 
threatened, and might be considered a key to the whole position. I rested in the 
edge of a wood, in the rear of an old field, across which my skirmishers occasion- 
ally exchanged shots with the enemy's pickets throughout the day, but without 
casualty to my command. 

"* * * About four o'clock P. M., the activity of the enemy's skirmishers 
increased and, in a short time, he advanced across the open space in our front 
in heavy force, moving in column by battalion, deploying as he advanced. My 
skirmishers were recalled and my left company, which had been thrown forward 
and to the left to cover my exposed flank, was forced back with some loss, and 
took its position in the line. The fire of my command was reserved until the 
enemy was within easy range, and when opened was so destructive that he fal- 
tered, passed to my left through the open space, and to my rear, losing heavily by 
the fire of my left wing as he passed, but threatening to cut off my command 
from our main forces. I at once sent information to my superior, and to the 
commander of the troops on my immediate right, of this peril to the whole line ; 
but, without orders to abandon my position, though very critical, I could do nothing 
but change the front of my extreme left to face the new danger, and to protect my 
flank and rear, if possible. This was done and a well-directed fire kept up to the 
front and left, which kept the enemy at bay. Meanwhile he was steadily pouring 
his columns past my left, and working across to the rear of my position, so that 



132 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

in a short time the battle was in full force far in my rear. In this state of affairs 
I discovered that all the troops on my right had been withdrawn, taking with 
them a portion of my right wing. Lieutenant Colonel Mix, in charge of the right 
wing, and Captain Miller, commanding Company B. on my extreme right, fell, 
fatally wounded. My attention had been chiefly directed to the front and left, 
as the most exposed directions, and I only came to a knowledge of the retrograde 
of the right when the first three companies were already gone. The timber and 
undergrowth were so thick that I could not observe my whole line from any one 
point. The movement was promptly checked, but the ground thus left vacant 
was almost immediately occupied by the enemy, and a destructive fire opened 
upon us from a new direction, rendering it necessar3' that it should be met by a 
new line, which was done. My lines now faced in three directions. I was com- 
pletely enveloped, without orders, and virtually in the hands of the enemy, had he 
dared to close in and overwhelm us with his masses now around us. This was 
my position until after sunset, by which time the enemy had left my front. Pass- 
ing now by my right to the rear, where the fight was still raging, and observing 
by the fire and cheers of our men that the enemy had been forced back on the 
left, and that our forces in that direction could not be far distant, I moved by the 
left flank about two hundred yards to the left and rear, where I met and joined 
our most advanced troops. My brave men were nearly out of ammunition, which 
for the past hour had been well husbanded ; they were exhausted but not dis- 
mayed, and we felt that the battlefield was ours. I inclose a list of the killed, 
wounded and missing, a total of two hundred and ten. * * * j\s we could not 
pass the picket lines during the night to reach our wounded still upon the 
field where they had fallen, and were compelled to abandon them in the morning, 
I fear the number of fatal casualties will exceed the number stated, and that 
of those reported as missing many are either killed or wounded. * * * Our 
position was such that many of the wounded, passing to the rear, must have 
fallen into the hands of the enemy. * * * Lieut. Col. Edward H. Mix and 
Capt. Amos B. Miller fell at their posts, while cheering and encouraging their 
men. In them, as also in Capt. Hubert F. Peebles, Capt. Michael Ackerman, 
First Lieut. John Devine, all dangerously wounded, and First Lieut. Thomas O. 
Howard, fatally wounded, I mourn the loss of good men as well as gallant 
soldiers. The record of others is found in casualty list in the body of this report. 
To Capt. Jonathan Hutchison my special thanks are due, not only for his gal- 
lantry but also for repressing reckless exposure among the men of his command, 
and thus saving valuable lives. His son, a youth of much promise, was killed 
by his side, early in the action." 

Then follows the long list of casualties, a summary of which shows that 
there were thirty-eight killed, one hundred and sixteen wounded and fifty-six 
missing; total two hundred and ten, about fifty per cent of the number of the 
regiment engaged in the battle. Many of those reported as missing were sub- 
sequently found to have been either killed or wounded. In the official report of 
the brigade commander, Col. William T. Shaw, of the Fourteenth Iowa, mention 
is made of the Thirty-second Iowa and its gallant commander, as follows: 

'T cannot speak too highly of my regimental commanders. Of Col. John 
Scott, Thirty-second Iowa, it is sufficient praise to say that he is v/orthy to com- 
mand the Thirty-second Iowa Infantry, a regiment which after being entirely 



HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 133 

surrounded and cut off from the rest of the command, with nearly one-half its 
number either killed or wounded, among them many of its best and most prom- 
inent officers, successfully forced its way through the enemy's lines, and was in 
line, ready and anxious to again meet the enemy, in less than thirty minutes." 

The total loss of Colonel Shaw's brigade at the battle of Pleasant Hill was 
four hundred and eighty-three. The losses by regiments were as follows : 
Fourteenth Iowa, eighty-nine ; Twenty-seventh Iowa, eighty-eight ; Thirty-second 
Iowa, two hundred and ten; Twenty-fourth JMissouri, ninety-six. There were 
fifteen regiments belonging to the detachment of the Sixteenth Corps, commanded 
iDy Gen. A. T- Smith, engaged in the battle, with a total loss of seven hundred and 
fifty-three. It will thus be seen that the four regiments of Shaw's brigade sus- 
tained nearlv two-thirds of the entire loss of General Smith's command. \\^ith 
a sufficient number of troops under his command to have defeated the enemy 
had thev all been brought into the engagement and properly handled. General 
Banks utilized only a portion of his army at Pleasant Hill, and thus demonstrated 
his unfitness for the command. He admitted tt) General Smith, on the field, that 
the valor of the troops of the Sixteenth Corps had saved his army. 

Early on the morning of April lo, 1864, General Banks ordered a retreat of 
the entire army to Grand Ecore, during which the Thirty-second Iowa, with its 
brigade was assigned to the position of rear guard. From Grand Ecore the 
retreat was continued to Natchitoches, and thence to Alexandria. The enemy 
had followed closely. Colonel Shaw's brigade still occupied the post of greatest 
danger, in the rear. From Alexandria the brigade was sent below the town and 
occupied a position near Governor Moore's plantation, wdiere it had frequent skir- 
mishes with the enemy. On May 13th, Alexandria was evacuated, and the army 
began its retreat down Red river. The rebel army continued to follow closely. 
and there were frequent skirmishes. On May i8th a severe engagement took 
place at Bayou De Glaize, in which the Thirty-second Iowa and the other regi- 
ments of the brigade bore a prominent part. The regiment was at that time under 
the command of Major Eberhart. from whose official report the following 
extracts are taken : 

" * * * At ten o'clock A. ]M., my regiment was ordered forward with 
the brigade to engage the enemy. In the brigade we occupied the position of 
Third Battalion ; on tlie right the Twenty-seventh Iowa and Twenty-fourth Mis- 
souri, on the left the Fourteenth Iowa. During the first part of the action, being 
on the second line, w'e were under a heavy fire of artillery. Some guns from the 
Third and Ninth Indiana batteries being thrown forward on the left, the Four- 
teenth Iowa was detached as support. * * * ^^ ^-j^js time I received orders 
to move by the left flank into the woods,, but the enemy having advanced so 
rapidly as the batteries came out. Brigadier General Mower in person gave me 
orders to change front by filing the battalion to the left, which w^as done in time 
to meet the attack. * * * fhe enemy was repulsed after a brisk action of 
ten or fifteen minutes. We w-ere afterwards thrown f.orward into the woods, 
but were not again under fire. Owing to the intense heat and necessary rapidity 
of our movement many of the men were entirely exhausted and had to l)e car- 
ried from the field. Officers and men conducted themselves in a creditable manner 
during the engagement." 

In this engagement, First Lieut. W.^illiam D. Templin. of Compam E. was 



134 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 

very severely wounded, four enlisted men were also severely, and one slightly, 
wounded. Major Eberhart and the other regimental commanders were highly 
commended by Colonel Shaw for the prompt and efficient manner in which they 
handled their respective regiments in this engagement. 

On May 19th the brigade lay in line of battle all day and until two o'clock 
A. M., of the 20th, when it again took up the line of march, and on the 22d reached 
the mouth of Red river, where it embarked on transports and was conveyed to 
Vicksburg, arriving there on May 24th. The operations of the Thirty-second Iowa 
and the troops with which it was associated on the Red river campaign will ever 
stand conspicuous in military history, for lofty courage, true devotion, and that 
noble spirit of sacrifice which was shown under circumstances of the most dis- 
couraging character. No troops displayed greater heroism during the ^^'ar of 
the Rebellion. 

On May 27, 1864, Colonel Scott tendered his resignation and severed his 
relations with the regiment. Both officers and men regretted to part with their 
brave commander. In a short parting address he gave his reasons for resigning, 
and carried with him the lasting friendship and good will of those with whom he 
had so long associated. The regiment remained at Vicksburg until June 5th, 
when it again embarked and proceeded up the river to Greenville, Mississippi, at 
which place, and at Point Chicot, Arkansas, the rebel, General ]\Iarmaduke, with a 
considerable force of infantry and artillery, was endeavoring to blockade the 
river, and had inflicted much damage by his attacks on the Federal transports. 
Disembarking on the Arkansas side of the river, June 6th, Gen. A. J. Smith moved 
his command rapidly against the main force of the enemy. In the engagement 
which ensued the enemy was driven from the field with heavy loss. The Thirty- 
second Iowa, v.'ith its brigade, participated in the engagement and lost eight men, 
killed and wounded. Having accomplished the object of the expedition, the 
troops marched to Columbia, Arkansas, and taking transports there, were con- 
veyed to Memphis, arriving there June loth, and remaining until June 24th, when 
with its brigade and division, it started on the expedition to Tupelo, Mississippi. 
IVIajor Eberhart had been promoted to lieutenant colonel and had been in command 
of the regiment since the resignation of Colonel Scott. Colonel Gilbert of the 
Twenty-seventh Iowa, had succeeded Colonel Shaw in command of the brigade. 
The Thirty-second Iowa sustained its full share of hard service on this expedition, 
and participated in the battles of Tupelo and Old Town Creek, under command 
of Major Hutchison, where, owing to its position in line, its losses were compara- 
tivelv light; but it ol)eyed every order promptly and acquitted itself with honor. 
Returning to Memphis, it remained in camp until August 4th, upon which date 
it started, with its brigade and division, upon the expedition to Oxford, Missis- 
sippi, in which it again Ijore its full share of hardship, marching in pursuit of 
the elusive enemy, with whom it did not come into contact, and returned to 
Memphis at the close of the month. 

On September 5th the regiment, with its brigade and division, embarked on 
transports and was conveyed to Cairo, Illinois, thence to Jefferson Barracks. Mis- 
souri, and from there by rail to Mineral Point, ^Missouri, returning to Jefferson 
Barracks on September 29th. On October 2d it marched with the army under 
Gen. A. J. Smith in pursuit of the rebel army under Gen. Sterling Price. This 
remarkable march extended to the Kansas line. There is no record of the regi- 

image
    HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY 135 ment having come into conflict with the enemy on this
    long march. There was a strong cavalry force which kept in advance and did most
    of the fighting. The rebel army was driven out of the state of Missouri, the cavalry
    keeping up the pursuit as far as the Ozark mountains, and the infantry returning
    to St. Louis. On this remarkable campaign the regiment had marched seven hundred
    miles, and upon its return to St. Louis on November i8th, many of the men were almost
    barefoot. The hardships to which they had been subjected were so great as almost
    to reach the limit of endurance, but they were only allowed a single week in which
    to rest and recuperate before entering upon another campaign. On November 25th the
    regiment, with the army under Gen. A. J. Smith, embarked on transports and proceeded
    to Smithland, Kentucky, and thence up the Cumberland river to Nashville, Tennessee,
    where the troops landed on Decem- ber 1st, marched three miles south of the city
    and went into camp. On the 15th and i6th of December, 1864, the regiment, with its
    brigade and division, advanced with the army, under Major General Thomas, to the
    attack of the rebel army under General Hood. On the 15th, the Thirty-second Iowa,
    occupying the position on the right of its brigade and conforming its movements
    to those of the troops on its right and front, advanced in line of battle for more
    than a mile. It continued on the reserve line during the day and did not come into
    direct conflict with the enemy. When the enemy's works had been carried by the troops
    in its front, the regiment moved forward 'One mile and a half and bivouacked on
    the field for the night. On the morning of the i6th the regi- ment, Avith its brigade,
    took the advance and soon came within range of the enemy's artillery from their
    second line of works. Here it was halted and remained for five hours, awaiting orders.
    The subsequent movements of the regiment on that day are described in the official
    report of Lieutenant Colonel Eberhart, as follows : "At 3:30 P. M., the right of
    the First Division carried the left of the enemy's works; we then moved forward
    at a double quick over an open field, under a severe fire from artillery and musketry,
    and in a few minutes gained the intrenchments, capturing about fifty prisoners and
    five pieces of artillery. Some of the artillerists were killed as they were leaving
    the guns. Private William May, of Company H, dashed forward and captured the battery
    guidon. The regiment moved forward in pursuit, gathering a few prisoners, until
    we reached the base of the mountain, when we received orders to halt. At dark, the
    battle being over, we were ordered into camp near the mountain. Too much cannot
    be said in praise of the conduct of the officers and men under the heavy fire during
    the charge; every one moved forward with a determination to carry the works. Where
    all behaved so creditably it is a delicate matter to make particular mention of
    persons, but I presume no exception will be taken when I speak of Lieut. W. L. Carpenter,
    acting regimental adjutant, who was, as usual, conspicuous for his brave and gallant
    conduct in the action, and was among the first over the rebel works. Also Capt.
    Theodore DeTar, who, after pursuing the enemy to the moun- tain, was wounded in
    the right ankle, making an amputation necessary. This will cause the loss to the
    regiment of one who has always been esteemed for his excellent qualities as an officer
    and a gentleman. First Serg. Daniel W. Albaugh, Company C, who was killed almost
    instantly by a minie ball, was one of our best non-commissioned officers, and was
    much loved by his company as an officer 136 HISTORY OF WEBSTER COUNTY and comrade.
    They mourn his loss deeply. My thanks are due to Maj. Jonathan Hutchison for his
    assistance during the action. I cannot refrain from mention- ing Color Serg. A.
    J. Ellis, of Company G, who carried the standard. Although once thrown to the ground
    by a glancing shot, he refused to give the standard to anyone else, but made his
    way forward, and was one of the tirst over the works. Corporal Bell, of Company
    G, who bore the regimental colors, was noticed for his bravery in action. I send
    you a list of casualties in the regiment, which is light only because the artillery
    was aimed too high, and the infantry were intimidated by our rapid firing as we
    advanced." The loss of the Thirty-second Iowa in the battle of Nashville, December
    i6, 1864, was three killed and fifteen wounded. It had nobly sustained its well-won
    reputation upon other fields as one of the best fighting regiments in the army.
    PVom the 17th to the 30th of December, it was engaged, with other troops, in the
    pursuit of the defeated and demoralized rebel army. The pursuit was abandoned at
    Lawrenceburg, Tennessee, on January i, 1865, the regiment marched to Clifton, on
    the Tennessee river, and embarking there on steamer, proceeded to Eastport, Mississippi,
    where it landed on January 5th and went into camp for a well- earned period of rest.
    On February 9, 1865, the regiment again embarked on steamer, was conveyed to Cairo,
    Illinois, and thence to New Orleans, where it disembarked on the 21st and went into
    camp near the city. On March 7, 1865, the regiment was taken on board an ocean steamship
    and conveyed to Dauphin Island, where it remained but a short time, going thence
    to Donnelly's Landing, Louisiana, from which it again took up the line of march
    and arrived at Sibley's Mills, near Mobile, Alabama, on March 26th. On April 3d
    the regiment again advanced with its brigade and joined the forces under General
    Steele, then engaged in the siege of Fort Blakely. The Thirty-second Iowa performed
    its full share of duty in the trenches during the siege, but was so well protected
    from the fire of the enemy that it had but one man wounded. The fort surrendered
    on the 9th of April, 1865, and that date marked the last conflict of the regiment.
    The great War of the Rel^ellion was practically ended. On April 13, 1865, the Thirty-second
    Iowa started on its last long march, and on the 27th reached Montgomery, Alabama,
    where it went into camp, remaining there and at another camp four miles from the
    city, until July 15. 1865, on which date it embarked on steamer and was conveyed
    down the Alabama river to Selma. From Selma it was conveyed by rail to Jackson,
    Mississip])i, and from that place marched to Vicksburg, where it embarked on steamer
    and proceeded to Clinton, Iowa, where, on the 24th day of August, 1865, it was mustered
    out of the service of the United States. The personal record of every officer and
    enlisted man of the regiment has been transcribed from the official records in the
    office of the adjutant general of the state of Iowa, and will be found in the subjoined
    roster. It will be noted that but few of the officers and enlisted men have received
    special mention in the official reports, from which quotations have been made in
    this historical sketch of the regiment. It will also be noted in the subjoined roster
    that aside from those who were killed, wounded, or missing in battle, or those who
    died from wounds or disease, or who were discharged or transferred, there were a
    large number of enlisted men and officers whose brief records show only con- tinuous
    service. The compiler wishes to call especial attention to the fact that HISTORY
    OF WEBSTER COUNTY 137 such records show conclusively that the history of those men
    is identical with that of their regiment. They may have been, and in most instances
    no doubt were, engaged with their less fortunate comrades, in the various movements
    and battles in which the regiment participated, and the records of their service
    is therefore a most honorable one. The survivors of the Thirty-second Regiment of
    Iowa Volunteer Infantry may well feel proud of the history, which they and their
    comrades who have answered the last roll call, were the makers. Posterity will lovingly
    cherish the memory of the brave men who gave such faithful service to their country
    in her time of greatest peril. The members of this splendid regiment, who were living
    at the time of its disbandment, have made their impress upon the history of the
    state of Iowa and of the other states of which many of them have become citizens
    since the close of the war. In all the honorabl avocations of life, as private citizens,
    and in the public service of both state and nation, they have distinguished themselves
    by the same devotion to duty which characterized their career as soldiers. 

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