Sioux County, Iowa

East Orange Township, Sioux County

An eye witness story of the erecting of
the depot at East Orange / Alton in 1872. I thought it was very
interesting as it indicated the beginnings of Alton back then.
~ Old news transcription submitted by researcher, Wilma VB

Friday Oct 11, 1872 Sioux County Herald page 4

Trip to East Orange (later named Alton) author unknown, assumed to
be the editor of the Herald, A Mr. L. Raymond reportedly was the owner
of the Herald as well as several other papers including the Lyon
County Press
.
On last Tuesday morning we concluded to make a visit to East Orange
Station, and it not being convenient for us to use the four horse
stage coach, and our liverymen couldn’t ‘see it’ in any very
satisfactory light, but we are, as the roguish, mischievous youngsters
have it, a “Meester St. Nicolaas beenen,” we concluded to take it
a foot being something of a pedestrian.

It is a gradual slope from this place to the Floyd
River, or station. The land over which we passed is of the best
quality, as the heavy luxuriant productions on the different
cultivated tracts will testify, these farmers were turning up the
rich, black loam, and preparing for ground for next year’s crop;
they all looked contented and happy, and why should they not, when
they have been so fortunate as to be located on the best portion of
‘God’s green earth.” In all this country known as the ‘New
Holland colony,” there was not a resident, two years ago, but now
can be numbered by the hundreds actual settlers those that have come
to stay, to develop this country and make homes for themselves and
their posterity. But we must pass on to the station.

East Orange Station is situated on the St. Paul and
Sioux City railroad, about three hundred rods south of the crossing of
the Floyd and three miles due east of this place (Orange City). It
consists of a station house, twenty five by forty five, one story, a
change from the original design, as we learn. The first intention was
to make it a two story fifty by ninety. The company is building a
nice little cottage near the station for the use of their agent. It
is sixteen by twenty five, with an elv, twelve by sixteen, a story and
half high. We learn from gentlemen connected with the road that it is
not the intention of the company to lay out a town at this place.
The workman employed at this station are putting on
the finishing touches, preparatory to passing down to Le Mars, to do
the company’s work at that station.

While at East Orange, we had the pleasure of an
introduction to Mr. A. L. Beach, the Company’s agent at this
station. From our short acquaintance with Mr. B. we should take him
to be a prince of good fellows. He also informed us that he had made
arrangements to go extensively into the lumber business, and was
expecting his lumber every day, when he expects by fair dealings to
secure a portion of the public patronage.

The station presents quite a lively appearance. As we passed by the
lumber yard of Burket and Warmhoudt, we say the boys busily engaged in
handling lumber, and from the number of ‘greenbax’ we say flipping
in the breeze, as they made change with customers we imagine they ar
doing a good business. We say Mr. Dingeman, our wheat merchant, busy
as a ‘nailer’ pushing cars, filled with wheat, in the direction of
St. Paul, to make room for others that he calculated to fill
immediately.



**Will post photos at a later date, when some become available.

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