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Ringgold Record
Mount Ayr, Ringgold County, Iowa
September 6, 1906

MISSIONARY to SOUDAN

Ralph TIDRICK of Liberty Township will leave September 12 for the foreign mission field at Doliab Hill, Soudan. Mr. TIDRICK, sent out by the Tingley U.P. congregation, is the third young man sent to the Egyptian field. The others were Dr. D. L. ASKREN and Prof. Clarence WILLIAMSON. Mr. TIDRICK'S work will be agricultural and industrial - teaching the natives how to farm.

Missionary Review of the World
New York.
Vol. 37, Page 632
January to December, 1914

WORLD-WIDE MISSIONARY NEWS

AFRICA

A LION KILLS A MISSIONARY

The death of a Christian missionary by a wild beast is almost unique in the annals of missions, but on April 21st word came from Khartum, Egypt, of the death of Rev. Ralph W. TIDRICK, of the American United Presbyterian Mission. Mr. TIDRICK, who was stationed at Boleib Hill, Sobat River, in the Egyptian Sudan, was attacked and wounded by a lion [on May 21, 1914], and started down the Nile for Khartum to undergo treatment, but died on reaching Khartum. Mr. TIDRICK was a native of Mount Ayr, Iowa, and was a graduate of the Iowa State College. He entered the missionary field in 1906, and leaves a widow and two children.

On the extreme eastern edge of the Sudan again we find the American United Presbyterians at work. Doleib Hill on the upper Nile and Nasser, farther up the Sobat, are their leading stations, where they are seeking to win the important Shilluk tribe. Hospitals, schools, preaching places, and industrial training are the agencies upon which they depend. The natives are of a savage character, and the country is infested with wild beasts. These outposts of Christianity call for a rugged and courageous type of missionary. The killing of Mr. Ralph W. TIDRICK by a lion illustrates the risks taken in the Sudan. A Shilluk village had complained of the ravages of some lions which were in- festing the neighborhood, and Mr. TIDRICK took his rifles and led a relief expedition.

With a company of natives, armed only with spears, he attacked a band of lions, killing one and driving the others into the tall grass. The grass was then set on fire and a huge lion rose up to see where the fire was located. Mr. TIDRICK fired, and the lion dropped, but soon rose again and was struck by a second bullet, after which he did not appear.

Shortly afterwards a second lion appeared, and Mr. TIDRICK dropped it also; but it, too, bounded up a second time, and was hit again. With the natives, Mr. TIDRICK pushed into the grass.

The first lion was found stone-dead; the second was wounded, but Mr. TIDRICK, being suspicious, turned to his gun-carrier for a particular rifle, and at that moment the huge beast was upon him. Before his helpers could come to the rescue with their spears, the missionary was mauled beyond recovery. By a relay of steamers, they managed to carry his mangled body to the government hospital at Khartum, but fever set in, and in a few days the brave soul took its flight. By such acts as this the missionaries of the Sudan reveal to the Africans how ready they are to serve them, even to the laying down of life.

SOURCE:  PATTON, Cornelius H. The Lure of Africa Pp. 78-9. Missionary Education Movement. New York. 1917

 

publication and date clipped off

IOWA MISSIONARY KILLED BY LION IN THE SUDAN
______________

Rev. Ralph W. Tidrick, Victim of Beast, Lived in Mount Ayr.

PHILADELPHIA, Pa., April 21. - The Rev. Ralph TIDRICK, the American missionary who was fatally mauled by a lion in the Sudan, was a native of Iowa. He was 39 years old, and a graduated of Iowa State college. Mr. TIDRICK leaves a widow and two children. His home was in Mount Ayr, Ia.

Submission by Theola Highshoe Weeda, October of 2012

publication and date clipped off

TIDRICK DEVOURED BY MOTHER LION
______________

Iowa Missionary Had Captured Two Cubs on Big Hunt.
______________

RELATIVES HEAR NEWS
______________
Mrs. William Lowe of Atlantice Relates Details of Incident.

ATLANTIC, Ia., April 21. - Special: Mrs. William LOWE, sister-in-law of Rev. Ralph W. TIDRICK, who was killed by a lion near Khartoum, Egyptian Sudan, received definite word regarding his death.

A cablegram sent to Morrison GISSON of Tarkio, Mo., by Rev. J. Kelley GISSON from Egypt, was sent to Mrs. LOWE here. It stated that Rev. TIDRICK was devoured by a lion. Although no details were given Mrs. LOWE is certain that a hunt in which the Iowa missionary took part a few weeks ago was the indirect cause of his death.

She was visiting her sister, Mrs. Ralph TIDRICK at the latter's home near Mount Ayr a short time ago when a letter reached there from the missionary. He told of having just returned from a hunt and of having killed two elephants and of caputuring two lion cubs alive.

Mrs. TIDRICK, knowing the country and the ferocity of the lions of that district, expressed fear for her husband's safety. She feels satisfied that the mother of the cubs followed the hunter and when the first opportunity arose, attacked him and mauled him in such a way that death resulted.

Mrs. TIDRICK was born and raised in this city. Her maiden name was Luella THOMPSON. She graduated from the Atlantic High school and completed her education at Tarkio college at Tarkio, Mo. She there met her husband and in October, 1906, they were married here at the home of Mrs. LOWE.

Owing to ill health, Mrs. TIDRICK did not accompany her husband on his trip to Egypt last October, when he was sent in the place of another missionary to Khartoum. She is now living on a farm between Mount Ayr and Tingley with ther three children. While ex-President Roosevelt was hunting in the Soudan district, he was entertained by Mr. and Mrs. TIDRICK.

The Rev. Mr. TIDRICK was on a furlough during most of 1913, and spent the time with his family at Mount Ayr and visitng relatives and friends here. He recived word in October to proceed to Khartoum to take the place of a missionary there, and met his death at that post.

Submission by Theola Highshoe Weeda, October of 2012

American Flag.jpg NOTE: Rev. Ralph Wishart TIDRICK was born April 13, 1875, Bedford, Taylor County, Iowa, the son of Daniel Calvin and Esther Jane (McCALL) TIDRICK He was a veteran of the Spanish-American War, enlisting at age 23 on June 13, 1898; mustered into service on June 13, 1898; mustered out of service at San Francisco, Cal. on November 2, 1899. Roster and Record of Iowa Soldiers, 1911.

Rev. TIDRICK graduated from Tarkio College in 1906, then studied agriculture at the Iowa State College before coming to the Sudan, working on the Sobat River under the United Presbyterian Board. Rev. TIDRICK was married to Sarah Luella THOMPSON on October 15, 1908. A Biographical Dictionary of the Sudan by Richard Leslie HILL, p. 359. Frank Cass & Co. Routledge. 1967.

Transcriptions and notes by Sharon R. Becker, May of 2009; updated September of 2011; updated October of 2012

To submit your Ringgold County obituaries, contact Sharon R. Becker at
srbecker@windstream.net.
Please include the word "Ringgold" in the subject line. Thank you.

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