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TALES from the FRONT PORCH

Ringgold County's Oral Legend & Memories Project

SNIPE HUNTING

In the early days, 'snipe-hunting' was a very popular sport of the old settlers.

Whenever they could find a gullible victim, they would talk about the pleasure and sport of snipe hunting. Accordingly, snipe were supposed to be very easy prey. One person would hold the bag while the others - the ones who knew the terrain quite well and were knowledgable about the intricacies of snipe hunting - would drive the snipe toward the waiting bag. Soon, the newcomer would become anxious to participate in the sport.

Many a weary night was spent waiting for the snipe to run into the bag held by the newcomer while supposedly the old hunters were out beating the bushes to round up and drive the birds.

Of course, the newcomer was always left 'holding the bag.'

Another similiar practical joke involves 'cow tipping.' But that's another story.

For the record: A snipe is from a family of 50 different species of shorebirds, close relatives of a woodcock. So they do actually exist.

SOURCE: Ringgold Roots Ringgold County Genealogical Society. Mount Ayr IA. Vol. II, pg. 15. April 1981.

Transcription by Sharon R. Becker, May of 2010

To contribute to "Tales from the Front Porch: Ringgold County's Oral Legend & Memories Project"
contact Sharon R. Becker at
srbecker@windstream.net.
Please include the word "Ringgold - Front Porch" in the subject line. Thank you.


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