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Biographical Sketches
  Norwalk Township
1883

ANEY, Jeremiah

Farmer, P. O. Neola, was born in Cherry Valley, Otsego Co., N. Y., July 17, 1832; he is the son of Jacob and Angeline (Putnam) Aney; his father and mother were both born in Cherry Valley, N. Y., he September 6, 1798, and is still living in New York; she about the year 1803. Our subject received a common school education and lived at home till he was twenty-one years of age; he was married, December 7, 1854, in Otsego County, N. Y., to Ellen Pearson, born in Cherry Valley July 14, 1835. She is the daughter of John Pearson, who was born in Mohawk, Montgomery Co., N. Y., September 16. 1804; he is still living in Otsego County, N. Y. Her mother, Mary Keeling, was born in Staffordshire, England, October 15, 1806. Our subject lived and farmed in Otsego County, N. Y. , until 1874, when he came to Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Here he lived for four years, after which he came to this county. He owns 200 acres of land in Section 11, Norwalk Township, and engaged in general farming. He has one child - Elmer F., who was born in Roseboom, Otsego Co., N. Y., November 9, 1857; he was married, in Council Bluffs. September 5, 1880, to Mary Charles, who was born in Wayne County, lnd., March 3, 1863. They have one child - Jeremiah Atwood, born May 9, 1881. Our subject is a member of the Society of Friends. In politics, he is a Democrat.


ASHLEY, E. B.

Farmer, P. O. Weston, was born in Darke County, Ohio, August 1, 1839; he is the son of Joel L and Mary Annie (Martin) Ashley; his father was born in Massachusetts about 1816; he was a stone and brick mason and an early settler of Ohio. His (subject's) mother was born in Ohio in 1818. Our subject had a limited common-school education; he worked at home on his father's farm until he was twenty-one years of age. He was married in Logan County, Ill., May 20, 1860, to Martha N., daughter of William and Elizabeth D. (Alsop) Shirley. She was born in Scott County, Ky., July 19, 1837. Both of her parents were natives of Kentucky. Our subject's parents moved to Logan County, Ill., in 1857. After his marriage, Mr. Ashley farmed in that State for about sixteen years; he then came to this county, March 8, 1876, and has been engaged in farming ever since. He has made a specialty of raising corn, but contemplates going into the stock-raising business. He has six children - Frank, born March 15, 1861; Rose, born February 26, 1864; Dolly, born March 1, 1866; Lena, born November 28, 1869; Cora, born September 11, 1871, and Birch, born July 27, 1874. Mr. Ashley is a member of the Christian Church. He votes the Republican ticket.


BRADFIELD, C.

Farmer, P. O. Neola, was born in Newberry, Berkshire, England, about 1842; he is the son of George and Sarah (Vockins) Bradfield, both of whom were natives of England, the father of Berkshire and the mother of Wiltshire. Our subject was raised in England and received his education in the common schools of that country. He came to the United States in 1861, and after living in New Y'ovk for one vear, he went to Utah. From Florence, Neb., he traveled by ox teams. He lived at Salt Lake for eigbt years, at the eud of which time he came to Council Bluffs by rail. Here he stayed for one year, when he came to the eastern part of Norwalk Township, where he has eighty acres of laud. He has been engaged in farming and blacksmithing for nearly the past twelve years. He was married, in Newberry, England, in 1860, to Maria Cuin, who was born in Hampstead, England, about 1840. They have had four children - all sons, of whom but one is living - Franklin Thomas, born in Utah November 22, 1867. In religion, Mr. Bradfield is a Mormon, and in politics a Greenbacker.


CHILDS, F. L.

Farmer, P. O. Neola, is one of the most enterprising farmers of this township, born in Jacksonville, Windham Co., Vt., Februaiy 26, 1843; he is the son of L. J. and Betsey (Bassett) Childs; his father was born in Windham County, Vt., March 16, 1815; his mother was born June 9, 1821. His father was a farmer, but was engaged at different times in various other occupations. He was a merchant, tavern-keeper and baker. While engaged in the latter capacity, he founded, in connection with his four brothers, the Mechanical Bakery of Chicago. Our subject's parents emigrated from Wilmington, Vt. , to Chicago, when he was a small boy. From this place, they moved to St. Charles, Kane Co.. Ill., where they lived for nine years. They then came to this county, locating in Norwalk Township in 1856. A brother and sister of our subject's mother accompanied them. The brother enlisted as a volunteer in an Iowa regiment and was killed at the battle of Pea Ridge. When our subject first came to this county, the country was wild and unsettled. Deer, elk, buffalo and lynx held full sway on the prairie, while catamounts, wild cats and wolves prowled about. While cutting timber, our subject killed a large catamount, and at one time, while coming home from school, he was followed by a lynx for a mile. Mr. Childs' farm now consists of 400 acres, all of which is under cultivation. He makes a specialty of feeding stock, for which he raises tame hay. This spring (1882), he has the credit of shipping the fattest cattle that were shipped from this county. He has always lived on his present place since coming to Iowa and is forward in improvements. His early education was received at Tabor, Fremont Co., Iowa. March 16, 1865, he was married, in Norwalk Township, to Margaret G. Dewey, who was born in Cambridgeshire, England, November 5, 1844. They have had five children, four of whom are living, viz., Ellen Dewey, born May 18, 1869; Bradford F., born July 27, 1874; George S., born Jan. 19, 1877, and Naomi Emily, born December 8, 1879; Charlie L. is dead. In religious matters, Mr. Childs is not denominational, and in politics, he is a Republican Greenbacker.


CLEARY, William

Farmer, P.O. Downsville, was born at Shawbridge, Terre Bonne Co., Canada, December 28, 1859; he is the son of William and Ann Jane (Shaw) Cleary; his father was a farmer and was born in the northern part of Ireland in 1810; his mother was born in Shawbridge, Canada, in 1826. Her father, William Shaw, built a bridge over the North River, from which circumstance the place was named Shawbridge. Our subject's parents had seventeen children - nine sons and eight daughters. Of these there are sixteen at present (1882) living. Our subject received a very limited education in the common schools of Canada. He worked on his father's farm until he was twenty-six years of age. In 1878, he came to Council Bluffs, and was engaged in teaming for two years. He then worked at the creamery of C. H. Wheeler for one year. In January, 1882, he bought eighty acres of land in Norwalk Township, where he now resides. He was married, April 4, 1882, to Maggie A. Tindele, who was born at Shawbridge, Canada. Mr. Cleary is a member of the M. E. Church.


FISHER, Henry G.

Farmer, P. O. Neola, was born in York County, Penn., June 18, 1837; he is the son of Robert and Catharine (Gatrost) Fisher. His father was a native of New York, and his mother of Hazen, Germany, and she was born about 1812. Our subject's education was wholly acquired in that practical school which has experience for its teacher. While a boy, he lived with his grandfather, who taught him the butcher's trade. At the age of sixteen, he apprenticed to a carpenter for three years, named Charles Neff, of Dallastown, York Co., Penn. He came West in 1856, traveling by rail from Harrisburg to Iowa City; at the latter place, he paid out his last money for a passage by stage to Des Moines. At this place, he was compelled to part with a good watch in order to secure a stage ticket to Council Bluffs. He arrived at the latter place on a very stormy winter day, December 19. 1856. The balance of that winter he spent with his uncle, Philip Gatrost. For several years following, he worked at his trade - carpentering. September 25, 1862, six miles east of the Bluffs, he was married to Hannah Graybill, who was born in Hancock County, Ill., August 3, 1842. She is the daughter of George and Mary (Smith) Graybill. Her father was a native of Ohio and her mother was born near Indianapolis, Ind. They were among the first settlers in Pottawattamie County, coming here when Mrs. Fisher was only three years old. Shortly after his marriage, our subject began farming. He rented land for four years of Dr. Phillips. One year, he sub-rented the farm, and 500 bushels of corn, along with the stable, was burned by the carelessness of the renters. He then purchased part of his present farm, and improved it. In 1867, he was engaged in butchering for the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad while it was being constructed through this county. This adventure proved to be very successful to our subject. He owed at times as high as $3,000 for cattle, and hold accounts amounting from $5,000 to $6,000. Part of this was lost, however, by the dishonesty on the part of one of the contractors. The nest year, he moved to Neola and engaged in the grain business, which he followed for three years. He lost two car loads of wheat and the same of corn in the great Chicago fire. In the spring of 1873, a fire destroyed his house and effects in Neola. He went back to his farm, and after living there for two years, was again burned out on July 3, 1875. He then bought an addition to his farm, and built the house in which he now resides. In 1881, he butchered for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad while it was in course of construction through this county. The present year, he has completed a canal for the same railroad through a portion of his own place. This was undertakeu and made a success after the failure of seven other contractors. Mr Fisher has six children - George E., born November 15, 1863; Manuel D., born February 15, 1865; Lucinda E., born June 18, 1868; Mary C, born June 20, 1870; Massa Anne, born October 4, 1873, and Stephen Ira Isaac, born August 23, 1881. In politics, Mr. Fisher is a Republican Greenbacker.


FLECK, Cordova

Miller, Downsville, was born in Richland County, Ohio, in November, 1843; he is the son of G. W. and Elizabeth (Hedrick) Fleck; his father was born in Pennsylvania in 1820; his mother was a native of Ohio, born in 1818, and died in 1860. Our subject owns and operates a mill on Mosquito Creek at Downsville. He is also Postmaster. He was married, iu Greene County, Iowa, October 30, 1S64, to Matilda A., born in Putnam County, Ind., the daughter of L. N. and Tabitha Wright. They have four children - Warren M., Elizabeth E., Jennie F. and Ida I.


GATROST, Henry

Farmer, P. O. Weston, was born iu this county July 31, 1848; he is the son of Philip and Catharine (Graybill) Gatrost. His father was a native of Germany and came to Pennsylvania when he was a boy. From there he moved to Illinois and afterward to this county, locating in Garner Township in 1846. His mother was born in Ashe County, N. C, in 1814; was brought to Ohio when an infant, and is still living in this county. Our subject was educated in the common schools of this county, and was an unusually diligent and attentive student. He worked on his father's farm till he was twenty years of age, when he was married to Emily, daughter of Asa and Drusilla Downs, who settled in this county in 1852. Our subject then farmed his father's place for five years, since which he has been engaged in farming on lands which he rents. His mother became connected with the Latter-Day Saints Church, in Ohio, in 1883; came to Caldwell County, Mo., where she experienced all the hardships of that people. They were mobbed and driven out of Missouri, when they went to Adams County, Ill., near Quincy. She came with the colony that founded Kanesville, this county, in 1846. Our subject's father was connected with the same church, after coming to Iowa, and died in that faith, November 5, 1870. Mr. and Mrs. Gatrost have eight children - Alvin J., Michael E., Ira E., John W., Forest A. , Ada A., Laura M. (deceased), Caroline I. and Eva J. ]Mr. Gatrost is a member of the Latter-Day Saints Church. In politics, he is a Republican.


GROTE, Fred S.

Farmer, P. O. Weston, was born in Germany September 10, 1850; he is the son of Fred and Eureka Grote; his father was a brick-maker, was born in 'Germany about 1819, and is now dead; his mother was two weeks older than her husband. Our subject's parents came from Germany to Council Bluffs in 1858, when he was a boy. He received a common-school education, and spent his youthful days in helping his father in the brick business. He was married, in Council Bluffs, in 1873, to Lena Lubbers, a native of Hanover, Germany. She was born in 1848, and came alone to Council Bluffs about 1871. She is the daughter of John and Angella Gertrude(Haka) Lubbers. Her father was born in Altenberg, in January, 1820. He came to Council Bluffs in 1876, and died May 18, 1882. Her mother was born in the same place in 1821, and died in Germany September 20, 1869. Mr. and Mrs. Grote have four children - Henry, born January 9, 1874; Minnie, born April 18, 1876; Fred, born December 30, 1877, and Harmon, born June 9, 1881. Mrs. Grote is a member of the Catholic Church. In politics, Mr. Grote is an Independent. He has 160 acres of land.


HEYWOOD, James

Farmer, P. O. Council Bluffs, was born in this county August 15, 1848. He is the son of Jonathan and Mary (Matheson) Heywood. His father was a shoemaker by trade, but was engaged most of his life in farming. He was born in Vermont in 1806. He came to this county thirty-seven years ago, and is still living three miles east of Council Bluffs. Our subject's mother was born in New York about 1824, and died at the age of thirty-six. Our subject received a common-school education and worked on his father's farm until he was nineteen years of age, at which time he began farming for himself. He was married, in Norwalk Township, February 10, 1870, to Ruth J. Price, born in Dowliss, Wales, August 29, 1848. She is the daughter of Rees D. and Jane (Jones) Price. Her father was born in Wales in 1812, and her mother in the same country in 1813. Mrs. Heywood was but five months old when her parents brought her to America. They came all the way to Council Bluffs by water, and was on board the first vessel that had ascended the Missouri to Traders Point. Our subject has 240 acres of land, most of which is in a good state of cultivation.


JOHNSON, F. T. C.

Farmer, P. O. Neola, was born in Augusta County, Va., June 16, 1834. He is the son of Francis and Mary Jane (Hall) Johnson. His father was an old Virginia planter, and was born in Augusta County, Va., in 1808. The old Johnson homestead is known in Virginia as Bushy Neck. It is a tract of land lying in a loop of the Middle River, a branch of the Shenandoah. It has come down through the family for 200 years, and was granted as a consideration for services rendered the crown of England. Onr subject's father had two brothers, both of whom died in the West Indies. Neither raised any children. Our subject's mother was born in Albemarle County, Va., in 1810. His advantages for an education were very limited, being confined to the old subscription schools. At the age of seventeen, he began an apprenticeship of three years to the carpenter's trade. For two years and eight months, he attended the University of Virginia, at Charlottsville, near Monticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson. Our subject concluded to come West, and arrived in Council Bluffs March 4. 1855. He came as far as Rock Island, Ill., bv rail, crossed the Mississippi on the ice; came as far as Winterset, Madison Co.. Iowa, by stage, and walked the balance of the distance, arriving several days ahead of the stage. The first summer he worked at his trade, doing the first work on the capitol at Omaha, and also working on George Izzard's house, the first Governor of Nebraska. The following winter he spent in Eastern Iowa. He returned the next spring and worked at his trade as a contractor. He built the court house and nearly all the schoolhouses up to 1870; also the residences of P. Batehell, John Bearsheim, L. Kirch and William Groneweg, together with most of the business houses on Broadway, up to 1870. He then settled on his present farm, Section 17, Norwalk Township, and has resided there since. September 20, 1857, he married Caroline, daughter of Col. L. W. and Mary Ellen (Farmer) Babbitt. She was born in Cleveland, Ohio, August 30, 1836. Her father was born in Ovid, Seneca Co., N. Y., January 30, 1812. He was one of the first settlers of this county. He first came as Register of the Land Office; was afterward the editor of the Council Bluffs Bugle. Mrs. Johnson's mother was born in West Virginia. Our subject has had six children, five of whom are living - Lysander, born July 4, 1858; Alexander, born November 29, 1859, and died in December, 1861; Mary Ellen, born July 30, 1861; Francis Lee, born April 7, 1863; Julian, born October 3, 1864, and Daisy, born December 9, 1873. In politics, Mr. Johnson is an old school Democrat.


KENNEDY, Patrick

Farmer, P. O. Neola, was born December 15, 1814, within one mile of the seashore, at Inniscron, County Sligo, Ireland. He is the son of Thomas and Hannah (Fox) Kennedy. His father was a farmer and was bom in Ireland about 1782. His mother was also born in Ireland about 1782. His parents had three children - two sons and a daughter. Our subject was educated in subscription schools in Ireland. He lived and worked with his father until his marriage, which occurred in 1844 at the place of his birth. His bride was Winifred Bourke, born September 20, 1815, the daughter of Thomas and Bridget (Fox) Bourke. The parents were both natives of County Sligo, Ireland. Our subject came to America in 1847, accompanied by his brother. He landed in New York City, and lived over three years in Pennsylvania. He then moved to Clark County, Ohio, where he lived about twenty-one years, afterward going to Caldwell County, Mo., where he lived about three years. An investment in land proved disastrous to the extent of $9,000, which represented his all. He then came to Council Bluffs, arriving in 1872, at which time he had just ten coppers left. He went to work with a will, and this year (1882), he was able to purchase 160 acres of well-improved land, for which he paid $3,500. Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy have had eight children, three of whom they have buried in Ohio. Those living are Mary, born March 25, 1845, she is the wife of Patrick Hannan; Margaret, born March 25, 1858, she was married to T. C. Brougham, and bore him three children, she died in February, 1880; Thomas, born September 18, 1847; John, born February 22. 1860, and Kate, born May 21, 1862. In religion, Mr. Kennedy is Catholic, and in politics, a Democrat.


KLOPPING, August

Farmer, P. O. Downsville, was born in Prussia, Germany, July 20, 1835; he is the son of Frederick and Sophia (Lukermann) Klopping; his father was a farmer and was born in Prussia about 1807, and died in that country about 1862. His mother was born in Prussia in 1810; she came to this country from Prussia in 1881, being in her seventy-second year, and is still living. Our subject was educated in his native land, and worked at home until he was twenty-one years of age. In April, 1854, he came to the United States, arriving in New York in May of the same year. He went at once to Freeport, Ill., where he lived for one year. He then came to Council Bluffs, where he worked as teamster for about two years. He was married, in Council Bluffs, November 21, 1858, to Maria Hatcher, who was born in Prussia May 2, 1838; she is the daughter of Peter and Maria (Myers) Hatcher, both of whom were natives of Prussia and both died in that country. Mrs. Klopping came from the old country to New Orleans in 1856. From there she went to Quincy, Ill., and finally, to Council Bluffs in 1857. After his marriage, our subject farmed for four years in Shelby County, Iowa. He then went to Freeport, Ill., where he stayed nearly a year. He then lived one year in Jasper County, Iowa, after which he returned to this county. He rented land for two years, and in 1866 he purchased 120 acres of his present farm. He then went to the Bluffs, and teamed again for two years. In the spring of 1869, he returned to his farm, and by successive purchases now has 520 acres, over 300 of which are under cultivation, the balance being in grass and timber. His specialty is raising cattle. Mr. and Mrs. Klopping have had ten children, seven of whom are living - Sophia, born November 27, 1859; Henry F., December 6, 1861, died January 28, 1863: Karl, born December 15, 1863; Edward, February 21, 1866, died July 27, 1867; Adolph, born March 25, 1868; Anna M., July 17, 1870; Emma, September 12, 1872; Louis, March 3, 1875; August, March 6, 1877; Louisa, July 18, 1880, died May 18, 1881.


LARKIN, Felix A.

Farmer, P. O. Downsville, was born in Jackson County, Iowa, October 23, 1857; he was the fourth child of Arthur and Bridget (McGivern) Larkin. His father was born in County Armagh, Ireland, March 1, 1829, and died in Jackson County, Iowa, April 1, 1873. His mother was also born in County Armagh, Ireland, February 1, 1828. The parents were married in 1852, in the Catholic Church, in Elgin, Ill., by the Rev. Father Pheely. They had nine children, of whom but four are now living - Felix A. (our subject), Arthur J., James E. and Alice E. The others were Peter, Michael, Margaret, Mary Ann, and John Frank. Our subject lived with his parents until his father's death, but is now working a farm of his own, consisting of 160 acres, as well as 120 acres in Hardin Township, owned by his mother. Mrs. Larkin, mother of subject, came to America in 1849, and her lato husband when he was quite young, living at various places from New York City to Clinton, Iowa. The family are members of the Catholic Church.


MAXFIELD, J. P.

Farmer, P. O. Neola, was born in Prince Edward's Island in August, 1839; he is the son of William and Sarah (Pickets) Maxfield. His father was a farmer and was born in England April 1, 1809, died in September, 1850. His mother was born on Prince Edward's Island Nov. 1, 1818, and died in November, 1871. Our subject received his early education in the common schools of this county. His parents left Prince Edward's Island June 1, 1850, and arrived in Council Bluffs July 17, of the same year. When a boy, our subject lived at home and worked upon his father's farm. He soon afterward made a start in life for himself, and was engaged in threshing for nine years. He now owns 195 acres of land, 120 acres of which are under cultivation, the balance being in timber and pasture. December 28, 1865, he was married, in Council Bluffs, to Sophronia E. Mott, born July 9, 1842, in the State of Illinois. She is the daughter of Lyman and Electa (Parish) Mott. Her father was born in Canada April 27, 1804, and died in January, 1880. Her mother was a native of New York. Mr. and Mrs. Maxfield have four children - Frank Albert, born October 9, 1867; Charles Edwin, born July 5, 1870; Nellie May, born November 1, 1874, and Ada Caroline, born June 21, 1877. In politics, Mr. Maxfield is a Democrat.


 PHILLIPS, William

Farmer, P. O. Neola, was born in Carmarthenshire, Wales, October 27, 1836. His father, William Phillips, was a farmer, and was born in Glanmorganshire, South Wales. He came to the United States in 1854, and located in the northern part of Utah, where he died about 1862. Our subject's mother, Gwenfred Thomas, was born in Glanmorganshire, South Wales. She died in Idaho, in November, 1873. Our subject was educated in select schools in Wales, which he attended until he was twelve years of age. He was then apprenticed to a cabinet-maker for four years, during which time he attended evening schools. After he had learned the trade, he worked at the same till he came to America with his father. He followed his trade for about two years in Utah, after which he was engaged in freighting, farming and stockraising until 1865. Mr. Phillips raised all kinds of grain, but mostly wheat, oats and barley. A half of an acre sowed in corn was considered a good acreage. The land was fertilized by irrigation. He bought and sold freight from Utah to Montana, and in 1863 started for the Yellowstone mines, taking his freight train and cattle with him. He learned from the prospectors that the mines were not a success, and he was obliged to take a large portion of his freight to Virginia City to get rid of it. He also sold his cattle on the Gallatin River. After giving up the idea of mining, he turned his attention to gardening and dairying, about eighty miles northeast of Virginia City, in which latter place he paid $75 for the last pound of onion seed in the market. In the summer, he sold his claim and garden. That summer the Crow Indians made a raid through the country, but did not disturb him. Mrs. Phillips was with her husband during these times, and was one of five women who constituted the feminine population of Gallatin Valley. After selling out, our subject went to Virginia City. He returned to Utah and engaged in freighting and dealing in stock until he left that State. He was married, in Utah, in March, 1859, to Amelia Morgan, who was born in Glamorganshire, South Wales, March 22, 1843. She is the daughter of John and Mary (Meredith) Morgan, both of whom were natives of Wales. Her mother died in her native land when Mrs. Phillips was an infant. Her father came to Conesville, Muscatine Co., Iowa, in 1850. He farmed two years on Little Mosquito Creek, when he went to Northern Utah, where he farmed and raised stock for a good many years. In 1865, he went to Idaho; where be died in 1869. Our subject left Utah and came to this county in September, 1865. He spent the summer in traveling through several States, looking for a location. He returned to this county, and in the fall of 1866, he bought and settled upon his present farm, in Norwalk Township, which consists of 400 acres. Here our subject has lived and farmed ever since he first purchased it. His specialty is raising corn, of which he has about 370 acres. Mr. Phillips has been Township Clerk, School Director, Trustee and Road Supervisor. He has seven children - Thomas William, born December 12, 1860; John M., born February 11, 1862; Mary A., born January 12, 1864; Evan, born March 6, 1867; Celia, born February 7, 1869; Morgan, born April 23, 1871, and Howell, born October 13, 1872. Mr. Phillips belongs to the Masonic order and also to the I. O. O. F.


SHARP, Henry

Farmer, P. O. Downsville, was born in Lincolnshire, England, June 3, 1857. He is the son of Spencer and Martha (Holmes) Sharp. His father was a farm bailiff, was born in England about 1820, and died in 1866. His mother was born in Lincolnshire, England, in 1825, and died in 1863. He received his education in Christ's Hospital, London, which was founded in 1552 by Edward the VI. Leaving school at the age of sixteen, he came to America. He left Liverpool May 6, 1873, arriving in New York the 17th, and in Council Bluffs the 24th day of the same month. From this time until 1875, he worked at home. In 1875, he and his brother rented the home farm. In 1877, in company with an elder brother, he rented a farm near Weston. During the year 1878, he worked for Mr. Heywood. He rented land for the following two years. In December, 1880, he bought forty acres of land from a brother, and in the spring of 1882 he added forty acres more, and is engaged in breaking the same. Mr. Sharp is not married. He is a member of the M. E. Church, and in politics a Republican.


SMITH, D. J.

Farmer, P. O. Neola, was born in Blue Rock Township, Muskingum County, Ohio, May 28, 1851. He is the son of Jonathan and Lois (Allen) Smith. His father was born in Virginia, January 16, 1804, and died April 19, 1875. He was one of the early settlers in Muskingum County, Ohio, emigrating from Virginia in 1808. Our subject's mother was a native of Massachusetts, and was born September 4, 1811; she is still living. Our subject received his education in Ohio. He lived at home till twenty-two years of age, when be went to Kansas, where he remained for two years. He then came to Page Connty, this State, where he lived for two years. He was married, at Clarinda, Page County, this State, in October, 1875, to Miss Sarah C. Gallup, who was born in Kingston, De Kalb Co., Ill., December 17, 1857; she is the daughter of Oliver R. and Mary (Anderson) Gallup; her father was born in Cambridge, Guernsey Co., Ohio, May 1, 1825; her mother was born in the same place May 1, 1831. Both the parents are living. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have three children - Ira M., born July 30, 1877; Nathan O., born March 24, 1879, and Mary L., born December 16, 1881. After his marriage, our subject came to this county. He rented land for three years, after which he purchased the farm on which he now resides, on which he has made substantial improvements. He votes the Republican ticket.


WARD, George T.

Farmer, P. O. Downsville, was born in Tazewell County, Va., October 15, 1837; he is the son of Milton and Martha D. (Thompson) Ward. His father was born in Tazewell County, Va., March 29, 1797, and died in February, 1879. His mother was born in the same county, in Virginia, in May, 1801, and died October 29, 1864. The Thompsons were one of the first families of Virginia. Our subject's grandmother, Rebecca Peery (maiden name), was born in a block-house in Tazewell County, Va. His grandfather Thompson was a Major in the Provincial militia. While out as a scout and in search of deer, he narrowly escaped capture and probably death at the hands of the Indians. The string of one of his moccasins fortunately became loosened, and, in stopping to tighten it, he fell considerably behind the rest of the little party, who were surprised by a band of Indians in ambush, who fell upon them, capturing live and killing the balance of three. Our subject's advantages for an education were extremely limited, there being no common schools in Virginia at that time. He worked at home with his father, who was a farmer and cattle-raiser, until the breaking out of the war of the rebellion. In 1861, he enlisted as a private in a confederate regiment, but ranked as Lieutenant Colonel in the militia of his native State. According to newspaper reports, at the time the Union forces were driving Gen. John S. Williams out of the Sandy Valley, our subject was the bearer of a dispatch from Gen. Marshall, ordering Williams through the mountains, from Kentucky to Virginia. Our subject was promoted to the rank of Captain. After becoming disabled, he sent in his resignation, which was never accepted, so he remained a conunissioned officer till the close of the war. He was with Gen. Morgan at Greenville, Tenn., at the time the General was killed. At the close of the war, in June, 1865, he surrendered at Charleston, W. Va. He was married, in Buchanan County, Va., November 12, 1861, to Jane Ratliff, who was born in Buchanan County, Va., May 29, 1843. She is the daughter of Abednego and Louisa (Matney) Ratliff. Her father was born in Tazewell County, Va., in 1801, and is still living. Her mother was also a native of Tazewell County, Va., and was born in 1799, and died December 3, 1868. Mr. and Mrs. Ward have had five children, of whom three are living - George E. (deceased), Archibald N., Eliza R., Lydia and Sarah E. (deceased). In religion, Mr. Ward is a Quaker, and in politics, a Democrat.


WIGHTMAN, D. E.

Farmer, P. O. Downsville, was born at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., December 8, 1833. He is the son of David and Elizabeth (Degroff) Wightman. His father was born in Pawlet, Vt., in 1806, and died in 1856. His mother was born in Connecticut in 1813, and died in 1848. Our subject emigrated from his native town, with his parents, to the western part of the State of New York, when he was a boy. At the age of sixteen, he went to Ellicottsville, the then county seat of Cattaraugus County, N. Y., to learn the carpenter's trade. When he became twenty years old he went to Ottawa, La Salle Co., Ill., where he stayed for one year. He then went to Rock Island, Ill., where he worked at his trade for four years, thence going to Iowa City, Iowa, where he remained for four months, finally returning to Ottawa, Ill., where he engaged in building houses and barns for the farmers. During this stay in Ottawa, he married Amanda L. Millikin, at Bruceville, La Salle County, February 1, 1860. She was born near Ottawa, Ill., .January 21, 1838, and is the daughter of Samuel and Rebecca (Williams) Millikin. Her father was born in Greensburg, Westmoreland Co., Penn., November 24, 1801, and died February 25, 1866. Her mother was born in Etna, Licking Co., Ohio, February 24, 1807, and is still living in Ottawa, Ill. Before her marriage, Mrs. Wightman was engaged in teaching school. She is a very intelligent lady, and is decided and earnest in her advocacy of religion and temperance. After the birth of two children, our subject went to Nebraska, with the intention of settling in that State, but not liking the country, he returned East as far as Council Bluffs, where he worked at his trade for six years. At the end of this time, he moved on to his present farm, in Norwalk Township, where he and his family have resided for the past ten years. Mr. and Mrs. Wightman have had four children - Mary E., born November 14, 1860; Rebecca E., born March 10, 1864: Charlie E., born July 17, 1867; and Ada, born July 4, 1869, died July 16, 1873. Mary E. is married, but her place at home is filled by her little son - Edward, a bright and interesting boy, who is the delight and pride of his grandparents. Mr. Wightman is at present Justice of the Peace.


From History of Pottawattamie County, Iowa, published by O. L. Baskin & Co.
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