KEOTA CENTENNIAL HISTORY
                             1873 - 1973

A glimpse into the past...

Greenhand, Funk's 304 Bushel Challenge Award, Jim Lutz Memorial Award, Scholarship and Leadership pins. To highlight the evening, a guest speaker or other entertainment is provided.

The State and National FFA organizations sponsor district contests in many different areas. Contests include parliamentary procedure teams, creed speaking, FFA manual quiz, public speaking, secretary's book, treasurer's book, scrapbooks extemporaneous speaking, conduct of meetings, proficiency awards, livestock, crop, and dairy awards, and a welding contest. Contests are graded by a bronze, silver, and gold ratings. The gold winners of each area advance to the next level of competition. Contestants can advance from subdistrict, to district, state, and the national contest held in Kansas City, Missouri during October.

New officers are elected yearly at chapter, district, state and national levels. Claude Greiner, President of the 1965 class, was honored to be elected district Vice-President that year.

Community projects are of interest to the FFA. They promote communities through a new program called "Building Our American Communities" (BOAC). They try to improve and help the community in which the chapter is organized. Members also plow and disk gardens during the spring and fall season. The club has a tree planter which can be used by anyone. County Extension help borrows this utensil to help individuals plant trees which would be too numerous to plant by hand.

FFA and FHA cooperate together to sponsor sledding parties and hayrides for the members of the Chapter. Co-sponsored projects help develop interest among members and cooperation among chapters.

The FFA offices of the chapters delegates the most responsibility a member can obtain in the club. The officers are the leaders and plan all activities of the chapter. This years officers are:

President, Joe Sieren; Vice-President, Randy Richardson; Secretary, Doug Vincent; Treasurer, Charles Fladung; Reporter, Scott Bennett; Sentinel, Bob Romoser; Advisor, Duane Sprouse.

By — Kevin Greiner

F.H.A.

Future Homemakers of America is the national organization of girls and boys studying homemaking. Any student who has taken or is taking a homemaking course may become a member. The overall goal of the organization is to help individuals improve personal family and community living, now and in the future. The motto is "Toward New Horizons" and the flower is the red rose. The organization was formed in 1945.

The officers elected to serve the Keota Chapter in 1945-1946 were: President, Pauline Dill; Vice-President, Lora Mae Palmer; Secretary, Janet Hulse; Treasurer, Mary Ann Jaeger; Reporter, Nadine Gretter; Parliamentarian, Joan Vogel; Song Leader, Janet Hulse; Historian, Martha Jean Peiffer.

Keota hosted the District F.H.A. convention in 1947. The local chapter has been well represented at the state level. The following girls have held state office:

1947-1948, Lora Mae Palmer , President

1949-1950, Norma Sellman, Music Chairman

1950-1951, Helen Holmes, Parliamentarian

1952-1953, Barbara Parsons, Music Chairman

1956-1957, Margaret Holmes, Gloria Sheets, Music Chairmen.

Following is a list of the presidents who have served the local chapter:

1945-1946, Pauline Dill   1953-1954, Rita Davis
1946-1947, Lora Mae Palmer   1954-1955, Carolyn Madison
1947-1948, Leorra Ranfield   1955-1956, Carol Luers
1948-1949, Norma Sellman   1956-1957, Margaret Holmes
1949-1950, Helen Holmes   1957-1958, Donna Greiner
1950-1951, Shirley Lyle   1958-1959, Bonnie Herr
1951-1952, Janice Dill   1959-1960, Carol Vogel
1952-1953, Delores Bermel   1960-1961, Sandra Barnum
1961-1962, Barbara Sheetz   1967-1968, Sue Wells
1962-1963, Berna Hahn   1968-1969, Mary Walker
1963-1964, Bonnie Greiner   1969-1970, Sue Pearson
1964-1965, Jeri Mayer   1970-1971, Carol Sondag
1965-1966, Charlotte Stoutner   1971-1972, Melody Flander
1966-1967, Sharon Zehr   1972-1973, Nancy Flynn

 

KEOTA SCHOOLS

School District No. 7 - 1905
1905. Teacher Altha Greenlee, District No. 7 Lafayette Township, 1 mile south of Keota.
It was from this school room July 17, 1873 that the Keota Independent School District
was formed. A petition signed by 19 residents of the town of Keota was presented to
Lafayette No. 7 school board asking to be set aside.

 

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A glimpse into the past...

Keota's First School
Keota's first school, first part built in 1874. Two
more additions built in 1876 and 1888.
Keota School - 1927
Keota School with new gymnasium-auditorium addition. Dedicated October 5, 1927.
Keota High School - 1891
Keota High School, December 8, 1891.
Keota's First Track Team
Keota's first track team. Back row left to right, Harry Helscher, ? Wolf, Paul Neal, Homer Stephen, Chas. Farmer, Superintendent and coach. Seated, "Chuck" Meghan, "Red" Howard Stewart, Roy Schotts, Arthur Clendenning, Eugene Smith.
School Burned - 1907
School House burned to the ground during the
Christmas vacation in 1907.
New School - 1909
Dedicated January 18, 1909.
First basketball Team 1915-16
1915-1916 Keota's first basketball team. Left to right, Marguerite Yoder, (Stewart) coach, Blanche Carris, Cecil Bowen, Nina Young, Corrine Coffman, Esther Kreger, Frances Dunbar or Ina Dorrance, LaNor Holmes, Margery Clarke, Esther Trumbauer, Mary Welsch, Elizabeth Lyle, Helen Singmaster, Dorothy Russell, Bernice McJunkin. First floor of three-story brick used to substitute for gym.

 

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A glimpse into the past...

KEOTA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES

1883
2
  1929
32
1884
10
  1930
27
1885
4
  1931
12
1886
10
  1932
32
1887
8
  1933
20
1888
12
  1934
24
1889
5
  1935
25
1890
13
  1936
25
1891
12
  1937
24
1892
11
  1938
22
1893
20
  1939
34
1894
12
  1940
23
1895
13
  1941
31
1896
8
  1942
25
1897
14
  1943
22
1898
15
  1944
25
1899
20
  1945
21
1900
12
  1946
32
1901
6
  1947
31
1902
7
  1948
26
1903
8
  1949
28
1904
9
  1950
22
1905
9
  1951
34
1906
7
  1952
22
1907
9
  1953
29
1908
10
  1954
38
1909
13
  1955
41
1910
6
  1956
44
1911
10
  1957
44
1912
8
  1958
31
1913
12
  1959
30
1914
12
  1960
37
1915
14
  1961
50
1916
12
  1962
36
1917
12
  1963
39
1918
17
  1964
34
1919
14
  1965
46
1920
14
  1966
58
1921
19
  1967
68
1922
11
  1968
59
1923
12
  1969
79
1923
11
  1970
65
1925
13
  1971
60
1926
20
  1972
50
1927
18
  1973
55
1928
22
   

 

Cap & Diploma graphic

 

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A glimpse into the past...

DEDICATE NEW
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, GYM

On Sunday, November 13, 1960, at 2:30 p.m., the Keota Community Elementary School was the scene of the culmination of a community's dream. This dream began five years ago when the committee to study school reorganization was appointed by the various school boards of the area.

As a result of the recommendation of this committee, the formation of the Keota Community School District was approved by the voters and became a legal district on July 1, 1956.

One of the first projects of the new school board was to appoint a committee of citizens to study the educational program of the new district. This committee found that Keota student population was overcrowding the present classroom facilities. Upon consultation with the Iowa State Department of Education, it was suggested that a new 16-room elementary building, a varsity gymnasium, with a recreation area and kitchen facilities, would leave the existing building for junior and senior high school. The Board of Education submitted this proposition to its constituents. On May 1, 1958, a $450,000.00 bond issue was passed with 87 1/2% voting yes.

The school district is made up of the Town of Keota and 13 districts in Washington county and 12 districts in Keokuk county.

This educational improvements program has been carried out under the administrative guidance of Superintendent V. H. Barnum. The members of the Board of Education who planned and carried out the building program were A.E. Hotle and Robert Vincent of Washington County, John E. Klein, Mrs. Dean Morris, Mrs. Gayle Brinning and Ralph Herr in Keokuk County.

Keota Elementary - 1960
Keota Elementary School. Dedicated November 13, 1960.

January 1, 1970. The architectural firm of Kohlrnann-Eckman-Hukill of Cedar Rapids has been retained by the Board of Education of the Keota Community School District for planning of new school facilities.

February 12, 1970. The School Board met with the architect and they directed the Board Attorney, Stephen Gerard of Sigourney, to prepare petitions for a bond issue of $990,000 for the purpose of building and equipping a Junior-Senior high school.

April 2, 1970. The school bond issue carried by 61.3%. A total of 1,134 votes were cast—696 in favor, 438 against.

June 25, 1970. The all purpose room and locker facilities addition to the Elementary School was started about 10 days ago by the contractor, Conner Brothers of Sigourney.

The Keota Community School District Formed. Thirty-two school districts voted June 26, 1956 on school re-organization. Twenty-six of the 32 school district plan, gave favorable votes for the proposal. The new district will bring together the area that the Keota school has serviced in the past with a total enrollment of approximately 500 pupils. The total vote was 728 yes to 182 no in the 32 districts.

Note: Since the 1956 election the six remaining school districts that voted against re-organization have voted into the Keota Community School District and the district now operates nine bus routes with nine school buses with three spare buses in case of emergency.

Since 1968 Denny Bohrofen has been School Bus Transportation Supervisor for the Keota Community School District.

Keota Secondary school
Open house at the new Keota Community's Jr.-Sr. High School was November 5, 1972.
A total of 601 people registered.

ARCHITECTURE OF KEOTA SCHOOL IS HONORED

November 30, 1972. Officials of the American Association of School Administrators have announced the selection of the recently completed junior-senior high school in Keota for inclusion in the 1973 Exhibition of School Architecture at Atlantic City and San Francisco early next year. The Keota building will be featured in the AASA 1973 filmstrip, a widely circulated document illustrating North America's outstanding educational buildings.

 

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A glimpse into the past...

The Keota facility was selected from a large number of entries, and was judged on the basis of adequacy of program, aesthetics, accessibility, community use, environmental controls and safety. The Keota school is the seventh educational plant designed by architect William Hukill of Design Associates, Cedar Rapids, to be similarly honored in recent years. V.H. Barnum is superintendent of the 350-student $850,000 structure which opened this fall for classes. —Cedar Rapids Gazette

SCHOOL SONG

Joyous and ever loyal

We will boost for our old high

Let every heart sing

Let every voice ring

There's no time to grieve or sigh

It's ever onward,

Our course pursuing

May defeat ne're our ardor cool,

But united, we will boost for her,

Our old high school.

School Buses
Keota Community School Buses.

 

St. Mary's Parochial School

A frame school building was erected in the year 1915 under the direction of Rev. L. Heinen. It was a two-story building 42 x 45 feet. The Keota Lumber Company furnished the lumber and George Conklin was the carpenter. St. Mary's Parochial School was dedicated March 16, 1916, but the building was opened to the pupils on Tuesday morning, January 4, 1916, in charge of Sisters Constantine, Rose and Mauritia of Milwaukee.

There were four classrooms all on the south side of the building, both upstairs and down, and the sisters' living and sleeping rooms were on the north side.

The first commencement exercise from St. Mary's High School was May 29, 1919, at the Princess Theater. There was one graduate, Margaret Ollinger, and two eighth grade graduates, Frances Gretter and Johnny Klein. St . Mary's School discontinued its high school department in 1931 with students attending their nearest high school.

When the present church and rectory were built, the old frame rectory which had been built in 1912 during the pastorate of Rev. N. J. Peiffer was converted into a convent for the Sisters of St. Francis of the Holy Family. Two classrooms were thus added to the school.

The new $28,000 St. Mary's Parochial Grade School was dedicated May 21, 1964. The building contains four class rooms, a faculty room, a music room and toilets. An 80 x 80 foot all purpose room with portable stage is to be used as a gym and auditorium. The building includes two complete kitchens, one for the school lunch program which has functioned at St. Mary's since 1947, the other for parish functions.

In 1969 St. Elizabeth Parish and St. Mary's Parish in Keota combined in an eight grade consolidated system. The board approved a plan with grade one through four at Harper and five through eight at Keota. The Keota-Harper merger necessitated the buying of a school bus for the two schools.

September 15, 1969, marked an important event of the newly formed Keota-Harper Catholic School. Parents and teachers met at St. Elizabeth's, Harper, for the purpose of organizing their Home and School Association.

St. Mary's School built 1916
St. Mary's School. Built in 1916. This is believed to be a dedication day picture.

St. Mary's School 1964
St. Mary's new Parochial Grade School was dedicated May 21, 1964.

 

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Long Branch trio ads

Wayne Feeds duo ads

 

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A glimpse into the past...

STORY OF KEOTA'S "ATHLETIC BOWL"

In the winter of 1933-1934, the government started a relief program called the Civil Works Administration (C.W.A.). The C.W.A. supplied funds to local authorities such as mayors of cities. These funds made possible such public projects as building streets, roads, schoolhouses, cleaning up parks, or doing other useful tasks.

In the fall of 1933 when the C.W.A. set-up was being made and funds were available for public works, N. G. McNurlen, then a member of the board of education and later its president, conceived the idea of reclaiming an old tile factory pit and converting it into a natural stadium.

One of the earliest business enterprises in Keota was a tile and brick factory owned and operated by E. A. Kennell and later by other men. After many years of successful operation the plant became unprofitable and was shut down and deserted. Eventually the kilns were torn down, the buildings became dilapidated and the great pit, 10 feet deep in places, grew into a picturesque place, with willows, maples, poplars, birch and wild plum growing in profusion, interspersed with little pools and lagoons of water where the frogs croaked in the springtime. It was a playground for the children of the town, and it was also a favorite hide-out for tramps. The hobos utilized old bricks from the factory ruins to build a fireplace in a sheltered nook; there they cooked their food and believe it or not they sometimes washed their clothes. They slept under an improvised shelter and — well, Keota was a good town for tramps to visit. The hobos had so increased in number that the pit was no longer a safe place for children to play. What to do with it had long been a subject of discussion. The cost of reclaiming it was prohibitive. Then came along the C.W.A.

Mr. McNurlen presented his idea to the board of education, and it was also presented to the town council. The "Athletic Bowl" became a community project, the completed bowl to be used for general athletic and recreational purposes and for public gatherings of other kinds.

The pit, which was approximately two town blocks long and one block wide, was purchased from Stewart Bros., who donated parking space along the north side. Later another lot was purchased making the project about two blocks square. Among those who were prominent in the development of the project were B. B. Brown and J. S. Carris, mayors; B. J. Bryne, local attorney; H. D. Corell, athletic coach during 1934 and 1935; H. A. Hofer, superintendent of schools; J. B. Ochs of the Community Club; and R. H. Teets who was marshall of the town during the greater part of the work, and to whom, more than any other one man, credit for supervision is due.

The project is owned jointly by the town and the public school. The ground was purchased by the high school from the school's athletic fund at a cost of $300. Incidental expenses amounting to approximately the same amount were paid by the town. All labor, except that donated, was paid for with public relief funds. (The Works Progress Administration, WPA, which was established to provide work for persons without jobs.)

The track is considered one of the finest tracks in southeastern Iowa.

Keota's new stadium was opened September 18, 1936 when Keota and Kalona played the opening game of football.

Keota Athletic Bowl
1933—1934
W.P.A. workers building Keota's Athletic Bowl.

**********

BOYS' SUMMER CAMP IN ED HOTLE TIMBER
June 14, 1945

Anton Hotle and Mr. Gills of Elmhurst, Illinois, have established a boys' farm camp in the "76" area in the Ed Hotle timber which will be composed of boys of high school age. They have named it the "Crooked Creek Farm Camp."

Twenty-five boys will come from Elmhurst to spend two weeks and will return to their homes and 25 more will come to camp. The camp at present is in the building.

Mrs. Hotle and Mrs. Gills will do the cooking for the camp.

July 5, 1945. "Crooked Creek Farm Camp" is a reality in "76" since last Tuesday when 25 boys came by bus from Elmhurst. They range in age from eight to 14. According to schedule they have a delightful summer planned for them. Even the menus are planned a month in advance.

 

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GSI ad

 

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A glimpse into the past...

4-H CLUBS STARTED IN KEOKUK COUNTY

The 4-H Clubs had their inception in a meeting held at Sigourney High School Auditorium on March 25 and 26, 1904, under the supervision of Cap E. Miller, then Keokuk County Superintendent of Schools.

At this meeting there were organized under the direction of Mr. Miller the County Boys' Agricultural Club and the County Girls' Home Culture Club. It was about three years later that the clubs began to be known as "4-H" Clubs, after the movement had spread to other counties in Iowa. Wright County, Iowa, claims credit for the 4-H name.

Mr. Miller, a native of South English and Keokuk County, was a prominent agriculture educator throughout his life. The progressive young superintendent had no thought of being one of the founders of a great national movement in 1904. His main idea was to interest the boys and girls of his schools in modern methods of farming and homemaking.

The late Cap Miller was honored for his pioneer work in organizing agricultural clubs which were the forerunners of the 4-H Clubs of today and now national and international institutions during the 50th anniversary of the national 4-H boys' and girls' club movement. This event was held in Sigourney July 14, 1954, at which time a bronze plaque was dedicated and placed for posterity on a large rock in the northwest corner of the court yard. Many of the "boys of 1904" and early members of the boys' agricultural clubs were present to pay tribute to Mr. Miller.

4-H Plaque

KEOTA AREA 4-H CLUBS
'76" Chickadees 4-H Club

A new 4-H Club was organized October 25, 1957, at the home of Karen Hotchkiss. It was to be known as the "76" Chickadees. Mrs. Gale Hotchkiss and Mrs. Marlin Romoser were the leaders and the officers were: Pres. Glenda Kay Stoutner; Vice Pres. Susie Romoser; Sec.-Treas. Karen Hotchkiss; Historian, Carol Huber; Reporter, Linda Bond.

The other members were Susan Huber, Karen Martin, Pam Anderson and Jeanne McCrabb.

The club was to meet the first Monday night of every month in the home of one of the girls.

Carol Huber and Mrs. Hotchkiss attended State Convention at Ames this first year.

July 21, 1958, the Chickadees held their first Local Achievement Show with Mrs. Small of Wellman as the judge. Home Furnishing was the Project this first year. The girls took 32 entries to the Washington County Fair.

President Glenda Stoutner had charge of the program enjoyed by 60 mothers and friends.

Carol Huber went to North Carolina to be a guest of a 4-H girl there in the Exchange Program.

In 1959 the girls decided to have a tea for their mothers and to present each mother with a corsage. This is now a regular event every May. They also had their first grooming contest with Linda Huber (Jr.), Susie Romoser (Int.) and Glenda Stourner (Sr.) representing their club at the County Contest.

Glenda Stoutner and Carol Huber took advantage of the 4-H Exchange program and visited 4-H girls in Bolivar County, Mississippi. The following year the Mississippi group visited here. In 1967 4-H'er Ruby Johnson from Sask., Canada, came to visit Shirley Stoutner and 1968 Shirley went to Sask at chewan to visit Ruby on the 4-H Exchange Program.

During the years Susan, Linda, Mary and Margaret Huber, Charlotte, Shirley and Barbara Stoutner, Susie Romoser and Twyla Pence are amon g the girls that have taken part in the Washington, D.C., Citizenship trip.

The Junior and Intermediate girls go to Lake Darling in the summer for four days. The Senior girls have winter camp to attend. In June there is an all day meeting with the girls planning the meal and the Leaders doing the Bar B Q'ing. There is sometimes three kinds of potatoes and always home-made ice cream.

When a girl has been in the club eight years and is ready to "graduate," the girls and the leaders treat her and her mother to a "dress up dinner " some place out-of-town. The other girls' mothers are guests, too.

Each year the girls give to I.F.Y. E. and take a fruit basket to Maplewood Manor at Thanksgiving time, take part in grooming contests and style revue, hostesses at Fair and help judges. We have floats in parades for Keota's "Fun Days" and are planning one for the Centennial, sold Christmas candles, photo albums, litterbuckets for the car, cards, etc., to make money, also made tray favors for Maplewood Manors open house. Some of the girls solicited "76" Township for the Red Cross. This year the girls are bringing recipes to each meeting and Mrs. Stoutner is going to make recipe books for each girl. At the 1972 Achievement Show 20 girls exhibited 92 entries and 53 of these went to the Washington County Fair.

 

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A glimpse into the past...

Since the club was organized over 700 entries have gone to the County Fair and many have gone on to the State Fair.

Mrs. Glenn Stoutner has been the leader since 1962. This year her assistants are: Mrs. Jim Henderson, Mrs. Leo Heisdorffer and Shirley Stoutner Flynn.

THE DUTCH CREEK FLYERS BOYS' 4-H CLUB

The Dutch Creek Flyers Boys' 4-H Club was organized by Robert Hyde in 1943. Gordon Shelman was the first leader and there were seven charter members.

They took part in the exchange program with boys from other states and for several years one of the members was elected to the County 4-H Council.

In 1963 there were 43 members and they won the Foster Award for being the outstanding club in the County that year. The leader for that year was Clifford Conklin with four assistant leaders.

They now have 20 members and the leaders are Jim Barnes and Bob Vincent.

DUTCH CREEK FLYERETTES 4-H

The Dutch Creek Flyerettes 4-H Club was organized October 8, 1959. Leaders were : Mrs . Leland Sheetz and Mrs. Cliff Conklin.

Members were: Shirley Conklin , Betty Crawford , Julie Sheetz , Mary Temple, Barbara Temple, Ann Van Sickle, and Cheryl Van Sickle.

The Officer s were President: Ann Van Sickle ; Vice Pres ident, Juli e Sheetz; Secretary-Treasurer, Bett y Crawford ; Reporter, Mary Temple; Historian, Shirley Conklin.

Officers for 1972 : President, Molly Trier; Vice President, Bernice Hahn; Secretary-Treasurer, Vickie Sieren ; Reporter, Mildred Hahn.

Leaders: Mrs. Donald Hahn; Assistant, Mrs. Gail Trier.

LAFAYETTE FEEDERS 4-H CLUB

The first record available for this Club is 1949 with Jim Palmer and Elvin Luers being the adult leaders. There were eighteen members — five of them girls: Cloyce Palmer, President; Earl Baumert, Vice-President; Alex Greiner, Secretary-Treasurer; Denny Palmer, Reporter and Historian. Besides the usual record book discussions, livestock feeding, Fair entry dates, etc., one of the projects that year was selling 75 boxes of garden seeds.

Cloyce Palmer was selected to represent their club in the calf catching contest at the Brown-Swiss Show in Keota that year.

A few records are missing but in 1955 we find Everett Dillon and Raymond Herr the leaders with Joe Stoutner serving as President and Sue Herr, Gary Moothart, Jim Stoutner and John Herr holding the other offices. During this year a hayride and skating party was held.

Other leaders over the next years were Jim Davis and Arthur Witthoft; Cleo Baughman and Gary Moothart. Leonard Bayliss took on the duties of adult leader in 1960 and continued until 1972. Helping him during these years were Willard Ginkens, James Greiner and Bob George.

The members have participated annually in the Keokuk County Fair, have had Club Tours and a window display during National 4-H Week. Also an occasional skating party and an annual Family Night was held, usually in cooperation with a nearby girls 4-H Club.

At the present time Don Shirk, Keokuk County Extension Agent, is serving as temporary adult leader with ten members enrolled. David Anderson is the elected President with Vic Brenneman, Steve Sieren, Lynn Brenneman and Marion Greiner holding the other offices.

FRIENDLY FAYETTES 4-H CLUB

In January, 1959, a new girls' 4-H Club was organized in Lafayette Township with eight members. Present were Connie Hammes, Karyl Jaeger, Linda Jaeger, Leslie MeRoberts, Ann Miller, Joyce Miller, Joyce Bayliss, Rosemary Bayliss. Mrs. Dennis Conrad and Mrs. Leonard Bayliss acted as adult leaders. This first year of the Friendly Fayettes, Joyce Miller served as President; Linda Jaeger, VicePresident; Joyce Bayliss, Secretary-Treasurer; Leslie McRoberts, Ann Miller, Reporters. Sewing was the main project this year and the members made a good start with their beginning sewing with several of their projects being selected for the County Fair.

Mrs. Orin Carr and Mrs. Merva Britten were the leaders in the year 1960 with Vickie Carr, Brenda Palmer, Sandra Patterson and Susan Francis joining as members. Rosemary Bayliss' refinished picture frame was selected for State Fair competition.

A notation found in the book kept by the girls reads, "Two of the members in our Club, Joyce and Ann Millers' great-great Uncle Cap Miller was the starter of 4-H in Iowa."

Mrs. Leonard Bayliss returned to the club to serve as the adult leader and Evelyn Daly, Linda Smith, Donna Blasi, Cheryl Blasi , Sandra Neal and Kathie Proctor were new members in 1961-62. That year, Joyce Bayliss attended the Iowa State 4-H Conference in Ames. She was also elected Keokuk County Girls President and she and her sister Rosemary presented a demonstration "Setting Safety" at the State Fair in 1964. Mrs. Jim Sieren joined Mrs. Bayliss to be one of the adult leaders this year also.

Since its organization, the Friendly Fayettes members have received each year a Certificate of Recognition, to acknowledge the club as a standard club. Many of the members have participated in the annual officers' training school held by the Keokuk County Officers. The older club members have been able to attend Senior 4-H State Camp at Madrid, Iowa, and District and State Conference. The younger members have enjoyed camping at Lake Darling. The window display has always been a part of National 4-H Week, usually winning a blue ribbon. The club has contributed annually to the 4-H United Service Fund and other

 

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Keota Centennial Committee

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