Garden Grove Express
May 3, 1894
Garden Grove, Iowa

GOLDEN WEDDING.

The golden wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Enos DAVIS was celebrated at their home four miles northeast of Garden Grove on Thursday, April 26, 1894. The family sent out a large number of invitations to their old neighbors and friends to be present on the occasion. They intended it to be a complete surprise to the "old folks," and I believe they succeeded for the first intimation they had of it was when the wagon loads of people began to come in from the north and the south, the east and the west, until over 100 people old and young had assembled to congratulate Mr. and Mrs. DAVIS on having "clam the hill together" for fifty years, they had passed the summit and now began to "totter doon" on the other side.

If they were surprised at the influx of old friends they were still more so at the splendid show of costly presents from the family and others. Friends outside of the family presented Mr. DAVIS with a beautiful gold watch with Elgin movement, one of the best time keepers there is made, and when he pulls it out of his pocket to note the time of day, he will undoubtedly think of the givers and the circumstances under which it was given.

Mrs. DAVIS was not forgotten on her golden wedding day, for the ladies presented her with a pair of fine gold bowed spectacles, with which she can see to read, not only her Bible and the current events of the day, but also see the feeling of kindness that prompted the givers. They were each presented with a handsome rocking chair in which they can, when the toils of the day are over, sit down and rest comfortably.

The family presented the old folks with a beautiful set of china ware, and other articles "too numerous to mention."

The Rev. Robert BEER made the presentation speech in an able and eloquent manner. On behalf of the neighbors and friends assembled there, he wished Mr. and Mrs. DAVIS much joy in having attained so auspicious an event, which happened to but few and hoped that many happy years were yet in store for them. He spoke very feelingly of their having braved the ups and downs of life for fifty years, and although the weight of years was settling upon them, they may be able to go out and in among their neighbors for many years to come. He described in a humorous manner the way the Buckeye bride and room were dressed fifty years ago. How Mrs. DAVIS had her hair combed and her dress waist and sleeves cut. Mr. DAVIS had high satin stock on his neck and the coat with brass buttons and claw-hammer tails.

The tables were set outside for the day was warm and beautiful and it would have been uncomfortable in the house. Such bountifully supplied tables we have not seen since the old days of Grange Harvest Feasts. There was abundance for all who were there and enough left to have made a good square meal for Coney's army. By the way we thought that the advance guard of KELLEY's army had come along here, for a "fife and drum corps" (minus the fife) marched along making music. They had a banner inscribed "Enos and Mary, 1844-1894. Mr. and Mrs. DAVIS came to Garden Grove in 1848 when there was not any Garden Grove, Leon, or Chariton and they grew up with the country and are always on hand on Old Settlers day.

During the afternoon Mr. and Mrs. DAVIS received a telegram from their friends in Ohio, congratulating them on the happy event. Most of those present were in the afternoon of life, but enjoyed themselves telling stories about old times, more particularly about scenes when the country was new, and the early settlers cabins were "like angels' visits, few and far between." Mc.

Copied by Stacey McDowell Dietiker
January 17, 2004