Descendants of Artemus Lamb and Maria Bailey

There are many biographies and obituaries for this family on our message boards.

1. Artemus1 Lamb, born in Connecticut. He married Maria Bailey, born in New York.

Children of Artemus Lamb and Maria Bailey were as follows:
2 i Merrette N.2 Lamb.
3 ii Emily2 Lamb.
4 iii Lucy2 Lamb.
5 iv Garrett2 Lamb.
+ 6 v Chancy2 Lamb, born 4 Jan 1816 in Ticonderoga, Essex, New York; died 12 Jul 1897 in
Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married Jane Bevier.

Generation 2

6. Chancy2 Lamb (Artemus1), born 4 Jan 1816 in Ticonderoga, Essex, New York; died 12 Jul 1897 in Clinton,
Clinton, Iowa; buried in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married on 17 Nov 1839 in Bradford, New York Jane
Bevier, born 10 Mar 1820 in Bradford, Steuben, New York; died 5 Mar 1897 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried in
Clinton, Clinton, Iowa, daughter of David Bevier and Sarah Geer.

Notes for Chancy Lamb
U.S. Census 1860 Index
Lamb, Chancy CLINTON TWP 305
Lamb, William H. CLINTON TWP 309

U.S. Census 1880
Chancy LAMB Self M M W 64 NY Proprietor Of SaVT VT
Jane LAMB Wife F M W 60 NY Keeping House NY CT
William E. YOUNG SonL M M W 35 NY Clerk In Saw MilNY NY
Emma E. YOUNG Dau F M W 30 IL At Home NY NY
Grace YOUNG GDau F S W 7 IA At School NY IL
Hattie LAMB Niece F S W 27 IN At Home NY NY
Fredrick WARE GSon M S W 19 IA At Home ENG NY

Children of Chancy Lamb and Jane Bevier were as follows:
+ 7 i Artemus3 Lamb, born 11 Sep 1840 in Bradford, Steuben, New York; died 23 Apr 1901 in
Coronado, California; buried in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married Henrietta Sabrina
Smith.
+ 8 ii Augusta3 Lamb, born 13 Aug 1842 in Penn Yan, New York; died 7 Mar 1914 in Clinton,
Clinton, Iowa; buried 10 Mar 1914 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married Edward Ware.
+ 9 iii Lafayette3 Lamb, born 26 Feb 1845 in Carroll, Illinois; died 30 May 1917 in Clinton,
Clinton, Iowa; buried in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married Olivia L. Hufman.
+ 10 iv Emma E.3 Lamb, born 30 Jun 1849 in Big Flats, New York; died 4 Jun 1926 in Clinton,
Clinton, Iowa; buried 7 Jun 1926 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married William E. Young.
11 v Celeste3 Lamb.
12 vi Merrette3 Lamb.

Generation 3

7. Artemus3 Lamb (Chancy2, Artemus1), born 11 Sep 1840 in Bradford, Steuben, New York; died 23 Apr 1901 in
Coronado, California; buried in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married on 11 Oct 1865 Henrietta Sabrina Smith,
born 16 Apr 1845 in Perry, Ohio; died 2 Apr 1925 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried 4 Apr 1925 in Clinton,
Clinton, Iowa.

Notes for Artemus Lamb
U.S. Census 1870
Lamb, Anna 2 W. LYONS 310
Lamb, Artemus 2 W. CLINTON 132
Lamb, Clancey 3 W. CLINTON 151
Lamb, Layfaette 3 W. CLINTON 144
Lamb, Patrick T. 4 W. CLINTON 172
Lamb, Sarah M. 4 W. CLINTON 155

1880 US Census Clinton Iowa
Artemus LAMB Self M M W 39 NY Lumber Dealer NY NY
Henrietta LAMB Wife F M W 35 OH Keeping House OH OH
Emma LAMB Dau F S W 13 IA At School --- ---
Garrett LAMB Son M S W 10 IA At School --- ---
Dwight LAMB Son M S W 9 IA At School --- ---
Clarra LAMB Dau F S W 6 IA At School --- ---
Burt LAMB Son M S W 4 IA --- ---

US Census 7 June 1900 SD 2 ED 9 Sheet 9B Second Ward 402 5th Avenue Dwelling 180 Family 190 Lamb,
Artemus b. Sep. 1839 age 60 Married 34 years b. New York President Bank

From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879) ARTEMUS LAMB, of the firm
of C. Lamb & Sons; is a native of Steuben Co., N. Y.; was born Sept. 11, 1840; when 16 years of age, he came
with his parents to Clinton, Iowa ; he entered his father's mills; after reaching manhood, he became interested in
the business with his father ; their business is very extensive and has grown to great magnitude, and, to a great
extent, the management devolves upon him. He has had charge of the Fire Department of Clinton for the past five
years, and has been a member of the City Council. Mr. Lamb married Miss Henrietta S. Smith, a native of Ohio;
they have five children-Emma R., Garrett D., James D., Clara J., and Lafayette B.

The Clinton Morning News Vol IV No. 139 Wednesday October 14, 1885 A Fairy Fete The Fifth Avenue
Mansion of Mr. Artemus Lamb the Scene of a Brilliant Social Affair The handsome residence of Mr. and Mrs.
Artemus Lamb, last evening, was the scene of one of the most brilliant social gatherings in the history of Clinton.
The occasion of the affair was the anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Lamb's marriage and also the introduction of their
daughter, Miss Emma, into society. The large house was a blaze of light from basement to roof, and the scene
presented was a most beautiful one. The attendance was large, nearly all the invitations issued being responded
to, and but few regrets being received. Flanagan & Greenhill's orchestra were in attendance and furnished
delightful music for those who desired to enjoy the pleasant waltz. At about eleven o'clock a fine collation was
served consisting of all the delicacies of the season. The costumes of the ladies present were very costly and
unusually handsome, especially that worn by the fair young debutante, upon whom was showered the
congratulations of all present. Miss Lamb will prove a valuable acquisition to the society of Clinton owing to her
personal beauty and mental attainments. Among those present from abroad were the following: Mr. and Mrs.
F.C. Weyerhauser and Miss Lizzie Weyerhauser, Miss Webber and Miss Guyer, of Rock Island; Mrs. J. Sloan,
Miss Mitchell, Miss Schrader, Miss Squires, Miss Trout, Mr. Lawrence and Mr. Squires, of Maquoketa; Miss M.
Stuart, of Detroit. It was not until a late hour that the guests departed for their homes, after wishing Mr. and Mrs.
Lamb many returns of their anniversary, and Miss Emma a life of pleasure, so auspiciously begun.
The Clinton Weekly Herald Thursday October 15, 1885 Social Scenes A Brilliant Anniversary Commeration
and Debutant Reception at Artemus Lamb's - Wedding Bells at LeRoy Bradley's - Etc. A Grand Reception An
entertainment, picturesque and charming in a high degree, was enjoyed by several hundred guests at the elegant
residence of Mr. and Mrs. Artemus Lamb on Fifth avenue Tuesday evening, Oct. 13th, the occasion being at once
a pleasant commemoration of the 20th wedding anniversary of the host and hostess and a favorable opportunity
for the social debut of Miss Emma Lamb, their accomplished daughter. Handsome lithographed invitations had
been extended to several hundred friends of Mr. and Mrs. Lamb residing here and elsewhere, and responses were
so numerous as to make necessary but few regrets. Lavish and suitable preparations were then entered upon by
Mr. and Mrs. Lamb and daughter and their guests as well, the consummation of which was a social event equaling
in brilliancy and ├ęclat any similar occasion in this city. The spacious and luxuriantly furnished parlors and
apartments of the mansion were tastefully adorned and brightly illuminated throughout, superb floral collections
and ornaments from Chicago delighting the air everywhere and filling it with a delicious perfume. The guests
uniformly attired in full evening dress, were received by Mr. and Mrs. Lamb and daughter, assisted by Mrs. W.G.
Bevier, of Tipton, and Miss Mary B. Stewart, of Detroit. Miss Lamb was radiant with the smiles of happiness
incident to so important and auspicious an epoch in her young career, and the host and hostess were noticeably
cordial and solicitous for the comfort of their friends. Meritorious efforts of Greenhill & Flanagan's full orchestra
gratified the musical taste and inspired the terpsichorean proclivities of the throng, while in the commodious
dining room the guests were abundantly served with choice refreshments from Kinsley's. At the request of Mr.
and Mrs. Lamb no presents were made. Among the guest from abroad Mr. and Mrs. F.C. Weyerhaeuser, Miss L.
Weyerhaeuser, Mrs. M. Blackburn, Miss A. Webber, Miss Annette Guyer and Miss Emma Chapman of Rock
Island; Mrs. John Sloan, Miss Thekla Von Schroeder, Misses Mitchell, Squires and Trout, and Mrssrs. Squires
and Lawrence, of Maquoketa; Miss Ryder, of Dubuque; Mrs. W.B. Bevier, of Tipton; Miss Mary B. Stewart, of
Detroit.

1886 History of Clinton Lamb, Artemus 167

The Clinton Daily Herald Wednesday April 24, 1901 The news of the death of Artemus Lamb was received
here Tuesday. His many friends in Camanche regret the final result of the railroad accident that brought about his
untimely

Wolfe's 1911 History of Clinton Lamb, Artemus, p. 684 Environment is said to be the making of a man's
character for good or evil. So is reflected upon a community, be it large or small, the life of an individual. If the
man is broad-minded, progressive and ambitious, there must follow an upbuilding that will outlast the mortal
career. Artemus Lamb who died April 23, 1901, left an ineffaceable record of good upon Clinton, Iowa, a city
that owes much to the stalwart Lamb family. Artemus Lamb was the oldest son of Chancy and Jane (Bevier)
Lamb and was born September 11, 1840, in Bradford, Steuben county, New York, where his father ran a sawmill.
His eduaction was gained in the public schools, mostly at Big Flats, Chemung county, New York. When sixteen
years old he went to Clinton with his father and ever after made that city his home. From boyhood he worked
with his father and was his constant associate and helpmate. He had a mechanical bent, which he cultivated for
many years, together with practical experience in sawmilling, and he assisted largely in bringing about the high
efficiency of the mills controlled by the Lambs. Before he had reached manhood Mr. Lamb entered the service of
his father, who conducted several manufacturing enterprises in Clinton. He was taken into partnership by the
senior Mr. Lamb in 1864, when the firm of C. Lamb & Sons was formed. From that time on the operations of the
concern were broadened rapidly. In 1868 the firm built a large mill structure of stone, and sawing was begun the
same year. An interest in the Cobb mill at Riverside, near Clinton, was secured in 1868, and Mr. Lamb and his
father organized, with S.B. Gardiner, S.W. Gardiner and John Byng, the firm of Lamb, Byng & Company. This
concern in 1872 acquired the sawmill of Wheeler & Warner, which property was located near the Cobb mill.Two
years later Artemus Lamb's brother, Lafayette Lamb, was admitted to partnership and the Lamb concern became
known at C. Lamb & Sons. The firm, in the spring of 1877, obtained the shares of S.W. Gardiner, S.B. Gardiner
and John Byng in Lamb, Byng & Company, and in January, 1878, the Lamb interests were incorporated under the
title of C. Lamb & Sons. Chancy Lamb was president, Lafayette Lamb, vice-president, and Artemus Lamb,
secretary and treasurer. It was in one of the four mills operated by the Lambs at Clinton that the use of the band
saw for cutting white pine is supposed to have been first attempted. Many innovations in sawmilling were
witnessed at the Lamb mill, including an edger of an entirely new type and a trimmer, besides a friction log turner
that, now driven by steam, is today known as a "nigger." The last of the Lamb operations at Clinton ended with
the shutting down of the remaining mill October 26, 1904. It is estimated that Mr. Lamb and his sons cut and
marketed more than three billion feet of lumber. While having a practical knowledge of sawmilling, Artemus
Lamb, later in life, paid more attention to the distribution of the lumber product and to the financial end of the
various business interests of his father, brother and himself. There was much of the typical American citizen
about Mr. Lamb, for he took an active interest in any and all of the enterprises of the city where he lived. He had
charge of the volunteer fire fighting force until 1879, and it was his earnest efforts that brought about the splendid
organization in which the city prides itself. He believed that it was his duty to enter politics and he served as
councilman, the recordsof that body revealing the earnestness and fidelity which which he served his fellow men.
One of Mr. Lamb's greatest achievements was the founding of the Peoples Trust & Savings Bank, of Clinton, in
1892, and it was to his influence that the institution in less than three years had deposits of more than three
million dollars and took rank with the more important financial organizations in the middle west. He was the
moving spirit in the organization of the Iowa Packing & Provision Company, of Clinton, and was heavily
interested in other ventures that paid, and still are paying, ever-increasing dividends. Besides the People's Trust &
Savings Bank, to which he gave much of his time, he was interested in the City National Bank, of Clinton; the
Clinton National Bank, of Clinton; the Lumberman's Bank, of Shell Lake, Wisconsin; the Merchants National
Bank, of Clinton, and the Clinton Savings Bank. He was president of the Clinton Gas Light & Coke Company,
vice-president of the Mississippi River Logging Company and a director in the Shell Lake Lumber Company, of
Shell Lake, Wisconsin. He was interested in sixteen lumber mills on the upper Mississippi river. He held the
office of vice-president of the Mississippi River Lumber Company, the Chippewa Logging Company and the
Crescent railroad, of Shell Lake, Wisconsin, and was a director in the Chippewa Lumber & Boom Company, of
Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin; the White River Lumber Company, of Mason, Wisconsin, and the Barronett Lumber
company, of Barronett, Wisconsin. In addition to these varied enterprises, Mr. Lamb had extended mining
interests at Deadwood, natable in what are known as the Bonanza mine and the Buxton, which were great
producers and divident payers. Masonry attracted much of the attention of Mr. Lamb, and he was given signal
recognition in the order, to which he was admitted in 1870. He was a member of Keystone Chapter No. 32, Royal
Arch, and of Holy Cross Commandery No. 10, Knights Templar, of Clinton, Iowa. He was made a Scottish-rite
Mason and for six years was master of Kadosh and was prior for many years. he was a member of the Royal
Order of Scotland (Scottish Rite) and was admitted to the El Kahir Shrine at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He was a
member of Clinton Council, in York-rite Masonry and also of the Knights of Pythias. He was an exhalted ruler of
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and for many years was president of the Wapsipinicon Club, of
Clinton. Mr. Lamb married Henriette Sabina Smity, who was a native of Perry county, Ohio, at Clinton, Iowa,
October 11, 1865. To the couple were born five children, three of whom are living: Emma Rena, widow of
Marvin J. Gates; Garrett Eugene, and Clara Augusta, wife of Russell B. McCoy. Burt Lafayette died January 30,
1898, and James Dwight was drowned May 5, 1905. Feeling that his constitution was being undermined by
business cares, Mr. Lamb started in January, 1901, for California to seek rest during the winter months. The train
on which he was a passenger was wrecked near Rock Springs, Wyoming, January 16, and Mr. Lamb was so
seriously injured that he never recovered, passing away at Coronado, California, April 23, 1901. The remains
were brought to Clinton and buried in the family mausoleum at Springdale cemetery. Mr. Lamb's life was full of
effort for others, and no mean proportion of the wealth he gathered was devoted to the poor of Clinton. His genial
ways and careful observance of the rights of others made him beloved not only by those who immediately
surrounded him, but by the thousands to whom he was less familiarly known. He attended the First Presbyterian
church and was for many years one of its trustees, contributing liberally to all its causes.

Obituary: The Clinton Daily Herald April 23, 1901 Lafayette Lamb received a message this morning, which
stated that his brother, Artemus Lamb, passed away at 4:40 o'clock this morning, at Coronado Beach, Cal. His
wife and four children, Garrett E. and M. Dwight, and Mrs. Emma Gates and Mrs. Clara McCoy, were all at the
bedside when the final summons came. The news of the death of Mr. Lamb will be no surprise to the residents of
this city, as it has been known for a number of days that the end was near. He practically recovered several weeks
ago from the injuries he received in the railway accident, and his permanent recovery seem certain. However,
heart trouble resulting from his long illness and general debility, and despite all that could be done by medical
skill, he gradually grew worse, and the end came at an early hour this morning. By the death of Artemus Lamb
Clinton loses one of its best known and most progressive citizens. He was at the head of the Lamb saw mills, the
most extensive along the Mississippi river; the president of the Iowa Packing and Provision company, and the
president of the People's Trust and Savings bank. He was also largely interested in numerous enterprises of this
city and in the pine regions, and had extensive mining interests. By the death of his father, the late Chancy Lamb,
being the eldest of the two sons identified with their father in the numerous business enterprises in which he was
interested, naturally assumed the responsibility as head of the C. Lamb & Sons' company. He successfully carried
on the new duties thus suddenly thrust upon him, and all of the enterprises of which he has assumed the
management have prospered to a large degree. His business career commenced in his sixteenth year, when he
entered his father's saw mill in this city. After he grew to manhood, he became a member of the firm and for
many years was his father's chief advisor in the conducting of the business of C. Lamb & Sons, which developed
rapidly and became an important factor in the lumber business in the middle west. But not only has Mr. Lamb
been successful in the lumber business, he has been equally successful in all of his business enterprises, and the
fact that Artemus Lamb was connected with a business industry was assurance of his success. He was an
indefatigable worker and gave the closest attention to every business detail. He was a large employer of labor and
was always held in the highest esteem by the hundreds of men in his employ. He believed in paying the laboring
man good wages and made the surroundings of those in his pay roll as pleasant as possible, and his death will be
mourned by hundreds of working men of this city, some of whom have been in the employ of C. Lamb & Sons
for nearly half a century. By the death of Artemus Lamb, the city of Clinton suffers what appears to be an
irreparable loss. There was no commendable enterprise, public or private, the he was not always ready to assist,
both by financial aid and helpful counsel. He was charitable and many of his kind deeds will be remembered by
the countless numbers that he has assisted, known only to those to whom a helping hand was extended. He was a
financial power in the city and will be missed, perhaps to a greater extent than any other man in Clinton. Mr.
Lamb's death was largely due to an accident which he received in a wreck on a Union Pacific train near Rock
Springs, Wyo. At the time of the accident, he was seated at a table in the dining car, which rolled down and
embankment. Mr. Lamb was more severely injured than any other person on the train. He was taken to the
hospital at Rock Springs, but in a few days was removed to the Hotel del Coronado, Cal., making the trip in the
private car of President Burt of the Union Pacific railway company. He was accompanied by the members of his
family and the head physician of the Union Pacific railway. He stood the trip well and for a few days showed
signs of improvement. However, blood poisoning set in and for several days his life was despaired of and his
relatives were summoned to his bedside. Specialists were sent for from San Francisco. After lying in a critical
condition for a number of days, he commenced to improve and at one time was apparently out of danger and was
able to be about the house. About a month ago he showed symptoms of heart trouble and it was feared from the
time that the end was near. At times he showed signs of improvement and messages of hope were wired to
anxious ones here, only to be followed by other messages less hopeful. A few days ago the attending physician
gave up all hopes of his recovery and the end came at the time stated above. Artemus Lamb was born in Steuben
county, N.Y., September 11, 1840. His early days were spent on a farm owned by his father in Carroll county,
Ill., where the family moved in 1844. In 1856, he came to Clinton with his parents, and went to work in his
father's saw mill, at that time a small concern. In 1865 he became a partner in what is now known as C. Lamb &
Sons. He was united in marriage with Henrietta S. Smith of Clinton, Oct. 11, 1865, who, with four children,
survive him. They are: Mrs. Marvin J. Gates, Garrett E., James d., and Mrs. R.B. McCoy, all of this city. Burt L.
Lamb the youngest son of the deceased, passed away a few years ago. Artemus Lamb was a descendent of
Thomas Lamb, who arrived in America from England with Winthrop in 1630, and through his mother's line, from
French Huguenots, who sought refuge in Ulster county, N.Y. before the American revolution.

1946 History of Clinton Lamb Artemus 65, 76, 85, 98, 116, 130, 137, 172

Notes for Henrietta Sabrina Smith
US Census 7 June 1900 SD 2 ED 9 Sheet 9B Second Ward 402 5th Avenue Dwelling 180 Family 190 Lamb,
Henrietta b. Apr. 1845 age 55 Married 34 years 0 children 0 living b. New York
US Census 19 April 1910 Clinton Twp. 402 Fifth Avenue Dwelling 80 Family 89 Lamb, Henrietta age 65 5
children 3 living b. Ohio

Obituary: Clinton Advertiser Saturday April 4, 1925 p. 6 Thursday night, Mrs. Artemus Lamb passed away at
her home on Fifth avenue, after a long and tedious illness. The Master called and she obeyed the loving
summons. Hers has been a useful and busy life. Charitable she was almost to a fault, and long before illness had
confined her to her home, she did her acts quietly and personally, without publicity or ostentation. Her heart and
hand were ever open to those in need, and her ready ear ever alert to the wail of suffering or distress. With all the
activities of her younger and busy days, must be added the crowning title of mother. This, the greatest mission
which can be entrusted to humanity, she fulfilled with an eye single to the wiches of the Master, and now, as we
lay her away, her children and children's children can rise up and call her blessed. Henrietta Sabrina Smith Lamb
was born in Perry, Ohio, April 16th, 1845, died April 2, 1925, making her nearly 80 years of age at the time of her
death. In 1847, her family came west, locating in Laona township, Winnebago county, Illinois. In 1854 they
moved to Maquoketa, Iowa; in October, 1860 to Clinton, this having been her home since that time. She was
married October 11th, 1865 to Artemus Lamb. To them were born five children-three sons, Garrett, Dwight and
Burt, and two daughters, Emma and Clara. Mr. Lamb and two sons, Dwight and Burt preceeded their mother in
joining the great majority. Of the surviving family there are three children, Garrett, Emma, (Mrs. M.J. Gates),
Clara (Mrs. R.B. McCoy), six grandchildren, Artemus Gates, New York City, John Gates, Bend, Oregon,
Henrietta Gates, Valeria (Mrs. Jack Thornton) New York City, Artemus Lamb in Yale, New Haven and Albert
McCoy and one sister, Mrs. J.S. Bevier. Funeral services were held at 3 o'clock this afternoon at the Fifth avenue
home. Rev. J.M. Duer, pastor of the First Presbyterian church officiated. Mrs. E.L. Miller and D.E. Leslie sang
during the service. Honorary pallbearers were A.G. Smith, A.R. Olney, John D. Van Allen, C.H. Young, W.W.
Cook, E.A. Schultz, G.L. Curtis, F.B. King and G.E. Wilson Jr. The service at Springdale cemetery was private.

Children of Artemus Lamb and Henrietta Sabrina Smith were as follows:
+ 13 i Emma Rena4 Lamb, born 6 Dec 1866 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 7 Feb 1945 in Phoenix,
Maricopa, Arizona; buried in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married Marvin J. Gates.
14 ii Garrett Eugene4 Lamb, born 14 Nov 1869 in Clinton, Iowa; died 30 Apr 1943 in Clinton,
Clinton, Iowa; buried 1 May 1943 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married on 6 Apr 1892
Gertrude May Ellis, born 27 Jan 1867 in Lyons, Clinton, Iowa; died 4 Jun 1934 in Clinton,
Clinton, Iowa; buried 6 Jun 1934 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa, daughter of Judge Lyman A. Ellis
and Mary Buckley. Notes: US Census 29 April 1910 Clinton Twp. 402 Fifth Avenue
Dwelling 401 Family 420 Lamb, Garrett E. age 40 Married 18 years b. Iowa Lumberman,
Banker 1911 Wolf's History of Clinton p. 676 Lamb, Garrett E., Iowa has been especially
honored in the character and career of her public and professional men. In every county there
are to be found, rising above their fellows, individuals born to leadership in the various
vocations and professions, men who dominate by natural endowment and force of character.
Such men are by no means rare and it is always profitable to study their lives and hold up
their achievements as incentives to greater activity and higher excellence on the part of others
just entering upon their first struggles with the world. These reflections are suggested by the
career of one who has forged his way to the front ranks and who by a strong inherent force
and innate ability, directed by intelligence and judgement of a high order, stands today among
the successful men of Clinton county and eastern Iowa. Garrett E. Lamb is a native son of
the Hawkeye state, having been born in Clinton county on November 14, 1869, and he is the
son of Artemus and Henrietta (Smith) Lamb. Artemus Lamb, who was the oldest son of
Chancy and Jane (Bevier) Lamb, was born September 11, 1840, in Bradford, Steuben county,
New York, and he gained his education in the public schools of his native state. At the age of
sixteen years he accompanied his father to Clinton county, Iowa, and his subsequent life was
identified with this county. He was early associated with his father in business and their
interests became very extensive, consisting of sawmilling, in which they became widely
known throught the eastern part of the state, the magnitude of their operations being
evidenced in the fact that up to the sutting down of their last mill in 1904, they had cut and
marketed over three billion feet of lumber. Artemus Lamb took a keen interest in his adopted
county and city and in 1892 he took the leading part in the organization of the People's Trust
and Savings Bank of Clinton, which was soon numbered among the leading banks of this part
of the middle West. He also had a large part in the organization of the Iowa Packing and
Provision Company, of Clinton. He was also interested in many other banks and business
enterprises, in all of which he was a leading spirit and in the direction of which his advice and
judgement were held in the highest esteem by his business associates. For a detailed acocunt
of his business career the reader is referred to his personal sketch, which appears elsewhere in
this work. Artemus Lamb died on April 23, 1901, his death resulting from injuries received
in a railroad wreck in Wyoming, while on his way to California, where he had hoped to
recuperate his health, which had become undermined by arduous business cares. To Artemus
and Henrietta Lamb were born five children, namely: Emma Rena, widow of Marvin J.
Gates; Garrett Eugene, the immediate subject of this sketch; Clara Augusta, wife of Russell
B. McCoy; Burt Lafayette and Jame Dwight are deceased. Garrett E. Lamb received his
elementary education in the public schools of Clinton, graduating from the high schools. He
then became a student in the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he remained two
years. At the end of that time he returned to his home and became associated with his father
and brothers in the firm of C. Lamb & Sons, which had been incorporated and which was
widely known as one of the most extensive and influential corporations in this section of the
country. Besides the extensive milling interests with which the company has been identified
were large mining interests, which invariable proved successful and financially profitable.
Mr. Lamb has in all his business enterprises exhibited the same soundness of judgement and
progressive spirit which characterized his father and grandfather and his career has been
marked by energy, persistence and shrewdness which have enabled him to accomplish very
definite results in all the lines to which he has lent his efforts. He is personally interested in
Arizona mining properties, and is president of the Iowa & Illinois Railway Company and of
the Clinton Gas Light & Coke Company. Affable and easily approached, Mr. Lamb enjoys
the unstinted friendship of all who are associated with him in business and the respect and
esteem of all who are brought in contact with him. He is loyal in his friendships and occupies
an enviable position in the city where so many years of his life have been spent. He has taken
a deep interest in the welfare of his community and his influence and support are invariable
given to every movement tending to the advancement of the best interests of the city or
county. Politically, Mr. Lamb is a stanch supporter of the Republican party, though his
extensive business interests have precluded his giving much attention to political affairs.
Fraternally, he is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, in which he has taken
all the degrees up to and including the thirty-second degree of the Scottish rite. He also
belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of the Elks. On the 6th day of April, 1892,
Mr. Lamb was united in marriage with Gertrude May Ellis, the daughter of Lyman A. and
Mary (Buckley) Ellis. Lyman A. Ellis, who during his lifetime occupied an exalted position
among the lawyers and statesmen of Iowa, was born in Burlington, Vermont, March 7, 1833,
of stalwart New England parentage. After completing an academic and law school education,
he was admitted to the bar, and in 1855 he came west to Iowa, with which he was ever
afterwards identified. His abilities were at once recognized and he quickly attained to an
enviable position at the bar of his state. For sixteen years he served as district attorney of the
seventh judicial district. Later he was elected state senator from Clinton county, giving such
efficient service that he was the unanimous choice of his party for re-election, but his
extensive legal practice compelled him to decline further political honors. His death occurred
on June 8, 1906. Obituary: The Clinton Herald Friday April 30, 1943 p. 10 Garrett E. Lamb,
73, lifetime Clinton resident and member of on of the prominent pioneer families with which
the development of the city is indelibly associated, died at 3 a.m. today in his home, 331 Fifth
avenue, South. Retired from active business for more than a decade, Mr. Lamb had been ill
for about three years. Funeral services will be held Saturday at 4:30 p.m. in the Bragonier
chapel with the Rev. Thomas Horton, D.D., rector of St. John's Episcopal church, officiating.
Interment will be in Springdale cemetery. Born Nov. 14, 1869, son of Artemus and Henrietta
Smith Lamb, Garret Eugene Lamb received his elementary education in the Clinton public
schools and later studied at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. During his business life, he
was associated with C. Lamb and Sons, one of the huge lumber companies which made
Clinton famous until decline of the sawmill industry here about the turn of the century. At
one time he served as president of the Clinton Gas Light and Coke company, now the
Interstate Power company, and he also was president of the Iowa and Illinois Railroad
company. Throughout his active career, he was identified with business and banking interests
and in the investment field. Mrs. Lamb, the former Gertrude May Ellis, died in 1934. Two
sisters, Mrs. Marvin J. Gates and Mrs. Russell B. McCoy, both of Clinton, survive, together
with nieces and nephews, Artemus L. Gates, Washington, D.C., assistant secretary of the
navy for aviation, Mrs. Lawrence Murphy and John Gates, both of Moline, Ill., Artemus D.
Lamb, Denver, Colo., and Mrs. Valeria Lamb Thornton, Laramie, Wyo. Two brothers, James
Dwight and Burt Lafayette Lamb, preceded him in death.
+ 15 iii James Dwight4 Lamb, born 25 Jun 1871 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 12 May 1905 in
near Bellevue, Jackson, Iowa; buried 15 May 1905 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married
Mollie Ankeny.
+ 16 iv Clara Augusta4 Lamb, born 30 Apr 1874 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 3 Mar 1955 in
Tucson, Pima, Arizona; buried 7 Mar 1955 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married Russell
Belknap McCoy.
17 v Lafayette Burt4 Lamb, born 1876 in Iowa; died bef 1925.


8. Augusta3 Lamb (Chancy2, Artemus1), born 13 Aug 1842 in Penn Yan, New York; died 7 Mar 1914 in Clinton,
Clinton, Iowa; buried 10 Mar 1914 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married Edward Ware, born 13 Jun 1830 in
England; died abt 1880.

Notes for Augusta Lamb
US Census 13 June 1900 SD 2 ED 9 Sheet 19 Second Ward 318 6th Avenue Dwelling 409 Family 435 Ware,
Augusta b. Jun. 1851 age 48 married 20 years 2 children 2 living b. New York
US Census 30 April 1910 Clinton Twp. 318 Sixth Avenue Dwelling 425 Family 445 Ware, Augusta age 68 6
children 6 living b. New York

Obituary: Clinton Daily Advertiser Monday March 9, 1914 p. 3 Mrs. Augusta Lamb Ware answered the last
summons to the great beyond at her residence, 318 Sixth avenue, in this city, at ten o'clock Saturday evening, after
a serious illness of four months. Before that time she had suffered from impaired health for more than a year.
Mrs. Ware was the daughter of Chancy Lamb and Jane Lamb and has lived in Clinton nearly all her life. Her age
was seventy-one years, seven months and twenty-one days. She was born at Penn Yan, N.Y., August 13, 1842,
and came west with her father and family in 1844, and the family settled near what is now Thomson, Ill. Seven
years afterwards the family returned east and then again removed to Fulton in 1852, and finally settled at Clinton
the year following, where she has since resided. She leaves surviving her five children, Fred E. Ware and Mrs.
Frank W. Ellis of Clinton, Iowa, Mrs. Jennie Wainwright and E.M. Ware at Louisville, Ky., and A.L. Ware of Los
Angeles, Cal., and three grandchildren. She is survived also by her sister, Mrs. Emma E. Young, and her brother,
Lafayette Lamb, who live here. Mrs. Ware has many warm friends in Clinton, especially among the older
residents, and her passing will cause them deep regret and profound sorrow. She was a woman of kindly and
gentle manner, charitable, generous and warm hearted. Mrs. Ware has helped to make brighter the sunshine of
life for some and assisted in a substantial way to the happiness and contentment of others. She will be sadly
missed by her family and friends and by many who know of liberal generosity and kindness. Funeral services
will be conducted at the residence, 318 Sixth avenue, at two o'clock Tuesday afternoon, March the tenth.

Burial: Springdale Cemetery

Notes for Edward Ware
From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879) Pages 669-697 Biographical
Sketches of Clinton Residents EDWARD WARE, with C. Lamb & Son; is a native of England, and was born
June 13, 1830; he came to America in 1842, and was brought up in York State; he came to Fulton in 1854, and
came to Clinton Co. in 1855 ; he was engineer of the first saw-mill in Clinton; when the war broke out, he
enlisted, in June, 1861, in the 1st I. V. C., Co. M; he remained in the service until March, 1866; he was promoted
to hold commission of Second Lieutenant when the war closed; since then, he has been engaged in steamboating
and in the lumber-yard of C. Lamb & Sons. He married Miss Augusta Lamb, daughter of C. Lamb, Esq., in 1859;
they have six children-Fred, Jennie, Willie, Lettie, Eddie, and Artemus.

1880 US Census
Edwin WARE Self M M W 50 ENG Works For Saw MiENG ENG
Augusta WARE Wife F M W 37 NY Keeping House NY NY
Jennie WARE Dau F W 18 IA At School --- ---
William WARE Son M S W 13 IA At Home --- ---
Lettie WARE Dau F S W 10 IA At School --- ---
Eddie WARE Son M S W 8 IA At School --- ---
Artimus WARE Son M S W 1 IA --- ---

Children of Augusta Lamb and Edward Ware were as follows:
18 i Fred E.4 Ware, born 16 Sep 1860 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 3 Apr 1921 in Clinton,
Clinton, Iowa; buried 6 Apr 1921 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married in 1890 Mary Reid,
born Dec 1863 in New York; died 17 Apr 1920 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois; buried 20 Apr
1920 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa, daughter of (---) Reid. Notes: US Census 7 June 1900 SD 2
ED 9 Sheet 9B Second Ward 435 5th Avenue Dwelling 184 Family 194 Ware, Fred b. Sep.
1860 age 39 Married 10 years b. Iowa Bookkeeper US Census 19 April 1910 Clinton Twp.
438 Fifth Avenue Dwelling 82 Family 91 Ware, Fred E. age 49 Married 20 years b. Iowa
Real Estate Insurance Obituary: The Clinton Herald Monday April 4, 1921 p. 15 Fred E.
Ware, 438 Fifth avenue, aged 60 years, a life time resident of Clinton, passed away at 7
o'clock yesterday morning at Jane Lamb hospital, his death following a week's illness.
Funeral services are to be held at the late home at 2:30 o'clock tomorrow afternoon with Rev.
F.H. Burrell officiating at the Episcopal service. Interment will be in Springdale cemetery.
The deceased was born in Clinton September 16, 1861, and had always made Clinton his
home. He was a graduate of Lake Forest, where he had received his finishing education, and
was for many years engaged in the insurance business in Clinton. In his early years he was
interested in athletics, as a participant, and in recent years had continued that interest as a
spectator. Mrs. Ware passed away a year ago in Chicago and Mr. Ware's mother, Mrs.
Aguusta Lamb Ware, preceded him in death about seven years. His father died many years
ago. Left to mourn the death of the deceased are two brothers, E.M. Ware of Los Angeles,
Calif., and A.L. Ware of San Francisco, Calif., and two sisters, Mrs. Jennie M. Wainwright
and Mrs. Frank W. Ellis, both of Clinton. The deceased was a member of the Masonic bodies
of Clinton including DeMolay consistory, A.A.S.R. Masons, and was popular in a large circle
of friends and acquaintances. He had never taken an active part in politics but was regarded
as one of Clinton's foremost citizens.
19 ii Jennie M.4 Ware, born 1862 in Iowa; died 30 Apr 1939 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois; buried 4
May 1939 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married John R. Wainwright, died bef 1939.
Notes: Obituary: The Clinton Herald Monday May 1, 1939 p. 5 Mrs. Jennie M. Wainwright,
a native and long time resident of Clinton, died at 5:15 a.m. Sunday in Chicago after a brief
illness resulting from a heart attack. The body will be brought to Clinton but funeral
arrangements have not been made, pending arrival of relatives from out of the city. Mrs.
Wainwright was a daughter of the late Edward and Augusta Lamb Ware and a granddaughter
of the late Chancy and Jane Bevier Lamb. She had lived in Chicago a number of years. The
Clinton Herald Tuesday May 2, 1939 p. 5 Funeral services for Mrs. Jennie M. Wainwright,
who died Sunday in Chicago, will be held at 2:30 p.m. Thursday in the Bragonier chapel.
Interment will be in Springdale cemetery. The body reposes in the chapel where friends may
call from 7 to 9 o'clock evenings. Mrs. Wainwright was preceded in death by her husband,
John R. Wainwright, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ware, a sister and four brothers.
Surviving are a niece, Mrs. Jane Ware Harrison, Van Nuys, Calif.; a nephew, Fred E. Ware,
Ocean Park, Calif., and two grandnephews, Fred and Edward Hiecke, Van Nuys, Calif.
20 iii Willie4 Ware, born 1867 in Iowa; died bef 1939.
+ 21 iv Celeste "Nettie"4 Ware, born Dec 1870 in Iowa; died 24 Mar 1926; buried 26 Mar 1926 in
Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married Frank Walcott Ellis.
22 v Eddie M.4 Ware, born 1872 in Iowa; died 1921/39.
23 vi Artemus L.4 Ware, born Mar 1879 in Iowa; died 1921/39. Notes: The Clinton Herald May
29, 1900 p. 5 Personal Paragraphs Artemus Ware left yesterday for a visit with friends in
Chicago. US Census 13 June 1900 SD 2 ED 9 Sheet 19 Second Ward 318 6th Avenue
Dwelling 409 Family 435 Ware, Artemus b. Mar. 1879 age 21 b. Iowa


9. Lafayette3 Lamb (Chancy2, Artemus1), born 26 Feb 1845 in Carroll, Illinois; died 30 May 1917 in Clinton,
Clinton, Iowa; buried in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married on 21 Aug 1866 Olivia L. Hufman, born 1849 in
Hufman, Schuykill, Pennsylvania; died 17 Jan 1924 in Pasadena, Los Angeles, California; buried in Clinton,
Clinton, Iowa, daughter of Robert Hufman and Isabella Taylor.

Notes for Lafayette Lamb
From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879) LAFAYETTE LAMB, of the
firm of C. Lamb & Sons, manufacturers of lumber; is a native of Carroll Co., Ill., and was born Feb. 26, 1845;
when 12 years of age, his parents came to Iowa and located in Clinton, where he was brought up and attended
school, and afterward entered his father's mills; in 1875, he became interested in the business with his father and
brother, the firm becoming C. Lamb & Sons, and they carry on a very extensive business; he is connected with the
Order of Masons and the Consistory of Lyons, the Order of Workmen and the Knights of Pythias. He married
Miss Olivia Hufman, a native of Schuylkill Co., Penn., Aug. 21, 1866; they have two children-Merette and
Chauncey.

U.S. Census 1880
Lafayette LAMB Self M M W 34 NY Proprietor Of SaNY NY
Olivia LAMB Wife F M W 31 PA Keeping House PA IRE
Maretta LAMB Dau F S W 12 IA At School IL PA
Chancy LAMB Son M S W 11 IA At School IL PA
Annie MOONEY Other F S W 22 IRE Domestic ServantIRE IRE
Annie MOORE Other F S W 23 OH Domestic ServantENG ENG
Kate HUFMAN SisterL F S W 17 IA At Home PA IRE
US Census 26 & 27 April 1910 337 Seventh Avenue Dwelling 264 Family 276 Lamb, Lafayette age 64 Married
44 years b. Illinois Wholesale lumberman

The Clinton Daily Herald Vol. XIL No. 301 Friday August 20, 1880 p. 3 Mr. Lafayette Lamb and family will
arrive here tomorrow.
The Clinton Daily Herald Vol. 32 No. 35 Tuesday October 11, 1898 p. 5 Local Snap Shots The Wanderer and
Idler are back from their trip south, coming in Monday evening, in command of Captain Duly. The returning
party consisted of Lafayette Lamb, Eugene Carpenter and George Pullman, Jr., and their families. They went as
far south as St. Louis and while there witnessed the festivities of the vieled prophet.
The Clinton Morning Age Vol. 18 No. 250 Tuesday October 22, 1901 p. 3 Lafe Lamb left for Minneapolis
Sunday evening.

1911 Wolf's History of Clinton Lamb, Lafayette, 681 After a man has won his laurels in the business world, it
is not easy for him to drop most of the perplexing cares and devote the balance of his days to the enjoyment of
what has been so honestly earned, as is shown by the larger number of men of rank who work on until death
overtakes them. But to enjoy life rationally, imbibing of the pleasures and comforts wealth commands, is but an
evidence of a broadness of character such as that of Lafayette Lamb, of Clinton, Iowa. Mr. Lamb is the fourth
child and second son of Chancy and Jane (Bevier) Lamb, and was born February 26, 1846, in Carroll county,
Illinois, sixteen miles from Clinton, Iowa. When he was five years old his father moved to Williamsport,
Pennsylvania, where the family remained one year, and then went to Big Flats, Chemung county, New York, the
father there superintending the milling operations of J.C. Cameron & Company. In those days traveling was a
hardship and the migration from Illinois to the Keystone state was made by going down the Mississippi river to
Cairo, from there to Pittsburg by water, and then to Harrisburg, going over the mountains by stage, traveling part
of the way by canal and a short distance by railroad. The child was a pupil in the public schools of Big Flats and
practically all of his elementary training was obtained there. When Lafayette Lamb was ten years old his father
moved the family to Fulton, Illinois, and in the following year, 1857, established a home in Clinton, Iowa, which
from that time on was the permanent residence of the Lambs. The head of the family bought a small sawmill and
lumber yard in the town and Lafayette, though only a boy, was called upon to assist in the operation of the mill.
His task was to raise the logs upon a rotary carriage as they were hauled into the mill, the work in that day being
carried on with a lever. The lad's schooling was of necessity restricted, and it was only when the river froze and
the mill ceased operations that he went to school, returning to the mill when sawing could be done. Upon the
plant being enlarged and a shingle mill being added, Mr. Lamb made shingles for his father for five years. His
first experience in the lumber yard was in 1862, when he started tallying, and after a year spent in familiarizing
himself with the grades, he became a retail salesman for his father. From 1862 to about 1864 the elder Lamb was
also engaged in the grist mill business, in which Lafayette assisted him. The money stringencies during the Civil
war compelled the lumber manufacturers to trade lumber for whatever the farmer raised that was marketable, and
the product of the Lambs' sawmill was given in exchange for grain, which was ground in the grist mill and sold at
wholesale to retailers. Shortly after his experience in the retail yard, Lafayette Lamb had charge of the grist mill
and continued in that capacity until the mill was sold and a sawmill built on its site. So varied and thorough had
been his training that Mr. Lamb when twenty-two years old was made foreman under S.B. Gardiner for C. Lamb
& son, his eldest brother, Artemus, having been admitted to the firm in 1864. In 1872 he took charge of the boats
furnishing the logs to the Lamb mills and had active charge of the logging when the first steamboat ever emplyed
on the Mississippi for towing log rafts was put into service. This vessel was the "James Means," and was the
forerunner of a valuable fleet of steamboats operated by the firm. For ten years Lafayette supervised this branch
of the business, although when his father and brother were away at times he had general charge of the firm's
affairs. He became a member of the firm of C. Lamb & Sons in 1874, and when the business was incorporated,
four years later, he was made vice-president of the company. Beginning in 1882, Mr. Lamb, though still retaining
charge of the river operations, gave more of his attention to the general details of the lumber business at Clinton,
Iowa, taking his father's place in its management as far as practicable. One by one,the four big sawmills of C.
Lamb & Sons were closed down as the supply of white pine timber diminished, the last mill going out of
commission October 26, 1904. During the forty-odd years Mr. Lamb and his sons carried on business,
approximately three billion feet of white pine lumber was sawed, besides a vast volume of pickets, shingles and
lath. The closing of the last Lamb mill at Clinton did not end the business career of this great family in the valley
of the Mississippi. Chancy Lamb, the founder of the house, died July 12, 1897, and Artemus Lamb, the elder son,
died April 23, 1901, from injuries received in a railroad wreck in Wyoming. Lafayette Lamb, the surviving
brother, is an active and virile man in many lines of business in the middle west, the Rocky mountain district and
on the Pacific coast. He is president and treasurer of C. Lamb & Sons, and also president of the following: Lamb-
Davis Lumber Company, Leavenworth, Washington; Lamb Lumber Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota;
Tumwater Savings Bank, Leavenworth, Washington. He is vice-president of the Mississippi River Lumber
Company, Clinton, Iowa; director of the American Wire Cloth Company, Clinton, Iowa. He is a trustee of the
Weyerhouser Timber Company,Tacoma, Washington and vice-president of the Carpenter-Lamb Company,
Minneapolis, Minnesota; a director of the Chippewa Lumber & Boom Company, Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin;
McCloud River Lumber Company, San Francisco, California; vice-president of the People's Trust & Savings
Bank, Clinton, Iowa; a director of the Clinton Gas Light & Coke Company, and the Iowa & Illinois Railway,
Clinton, Iowa. Mr. Lamb is a stockholder in the following: People's Trust & Savings Bank, Clinton National
Bank, Merchants National Bank and Cromwell Hotel Company, all of Clinton, Iowa; Northern Lumber Company,
Cloquet, Minnesota, and Tampa Hotel Company, Tampa, Florida. He has a one-third interest in one of the
biggest ranches in Colorado, known as the Studebaker-Lamb-Witwer Ranch, which is nine miles west of Gerley
and fifty miles from Denver. It contains four thousand acres and controls eleven miles of riparian rights on the
Platte river. Mr. Lamb married Olivia A. Hufman, of Clinton, August 21, 1866. To them were born two children,
Merrette, wife of Eugene J. Carpenter, of Carpenter-Lamb Company, of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Chancy R.
Lamb of Minneapolis, whis the active factor in the Bacon --- ---- ---. Mr. Lamb became a Mason in 1870, in
Emulation Lodge No. 255. He is a member of Keystone Chapter and received the Scottish Rite degrees in 1871.
Five years later he took the balance of the York Rite degrees in Holy Cross Commandery No. 10, of Clinton. Mr.
Lamb is a member of the Shrine, Knights of Pythias and the Elks. In politics he is a Republican, but never has
taken a leading part in the deliberations of the party. His is a Presbyterian and has given liberally to the church.
Mr. Lamb recently built a beautiful home in Clinton, where he and his wife entertain most generously. He spends
much of his leisure time in company with his friends, cruising up and down the Mississippi river in his houseboat,
"Idler," which is towed by his steamer, "Wanderer." Like other members of this prominent family, Mr. Lamb is
popular with a wide circle of friends in all walks of life.

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Thursday May 31, 1917 p. 1 & 3 Lafayette Lamb, aged 71 years, a resident of
Clinton for 60 years, one of Clinton's pioneer lumber manufacturers and for more than half a century actively
identified with the development of Clinton industrially and financially, passed away at his home, 317 Seventh
avenue, at 5:45 o'clock last night. His death followed an illness of three years' duration, recognized by his family
for many months as fatal. Funeral services are to be held the late home at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon and all
friends are asked to come to the services at the home. The committal services at the family mausoleum in
Springdale cemetery, however, will be private. Friends are asked not to send flowers. C.R. Lamb, a son and wife
will arrive from New York tomorrow. Mrs. E.J. Carpenter, a daughter, and husband, of Minneapolis, have been
here since Tuesday. During recent years, on account of the condition of his health, Mr. Lamb had spent a large
part of his time in other climates. He had returned only two weeks ago from California, where he had spent the
winter. The death of Mr. Lamb has brought grief today into hundreds of Clinton homes, the home of former
business associates and of former employees of C. Lamb & Sons, lumber manufacturers and of other concerns
with which Mr. Lamb was identified. His many years of residence in Clinton had brought him an
acquaintanceship equaled by few, if any, other Clinton residents. Friendships were cemented by Mr. Lamb
through thoughtfulness. He never lost an opportunity to recognize by word or deed, and acquaintance of the years
past. If any of his old friends were ever apparently ignored, it was due to the frailties of the human senses and not
to the heart, for he carefully guarded and endeavored to preserve the friendships of the past with those of the
present. Not only relatives and intimate friends and acquaintances are mourning his death today, however. They
are joined by the city as a whole for Mr. Lamb's interests were so interwoven with those of the community that he
was recognized as one of the city's builders - one of those whose keen foresight and business acumen laid the
foundations in the early days, for the city of the present and that of the future. Preceded in death by his father, the
late Chancy Lamb, founder of C. Lamb & Sons, and his brother, the late Artemus Lamb, who was also associated
in the business, the death of Mr. Lamb marks the passing of the last of the pioneer members of that family of
lumber manufacturers and also the last of all of the pioneer saw mill operators, who established themselves in
Clinton and made of the little community a growing city. Mr. Lamb was identified with and watched the start, the
development and the decline of the lumber business in Clinton. With the end of Clinton's "saw mill" days
approaching, Mr. Lamb sought other fields for the exercise of his business and executive acumen. Not only did
he become closely associated in the management of other lumber manufacturing plants at various places in the
middle west, the Rocky mountain district and on the Pacific coast, but he also became identified with other
Clinton industrial and financial institutions. He was elected to various offices in the management of these
concerns, but retired from active participation in the conduct of the affairs of these firms since his illness became
so acute as to demand all of his strength. Mr. Lamb was the fourth child and second son of Chancy and Jane
(Bevier) Lamb. He was born February 26, 1846, in Carroll county, Illinois, but when he was five years old, his
father moved to Williamsport, Pa., where the family remained a year, moving then to Big Flats, Chemung county,
New York, where the father superintended the milling operations of J.C. Cameron & Co. When Mr. Lamb was
10 years old, his father returned to the middle west, settling in Fulton, Ill., but in the following year, 1857,
established a home in Clinton, which thereafter remained the permanent home of the family. Mr. Lamb's father
purchased a small sawmill and lumber yard in Clinton and Mr. Lamb, although only a boy, was called upon to
assist in its operation. Mr. Lamb's task was to raise the logs upon a rotary carriage as they were hauled into the
mill, thus beginning at the bottom of the ladder in the saw mill industry. His schooling was naturally restricted,
being limited to the winter months when the mill was forced to close on account of ice in the river. Later the
plant was enlarged and a shingle mill added, Mr. Lamb making shingles for his father for five years. In 1862, Mr.
Lamb went into the lumber yard as a tally clerk and a year later became a retail salesman for his father. During
the Civil war period, Mr. Lamb's father also operated a grist mill, with the assistance of his son. The family
weathered the financial stringency of the period by trading lumber to the farmers in exchange for grain and
grinding the latter in the grist mill. LaFayette Lamb finally was given management of the grist mill and operated
it until it was discontinued and a saw mill built on its site. When 22 years of age, Mr. Lamb was made foreman
under S.B. Gardiner of C. Lamb & Son, his elder brother, Artemus having been admitted to the firm in 1864. In
1872 he took charge of the boats furnishing the logs to the Lamb mills and had active charge of the logging when
the first steamboat ever employed on the Mississippi rover for towing log rafts was put into service. This vessel
was the James Mean, and was the forerunner of a valuable fleet of steamboats operated by the firm. For ten years
Mr. Lamb supervised this branch of the business, although when his father and brother were away at times he had
general charge of the firm's affairs. He became a member of C. Lamb & Sons, in 1874, and when the business
was incorporated, four years later, he was made vice president of the company. Beginning with 1882, Mr. Lamb,
though still retaining charge of the river operations, gave more of his attention to the general details of the lumber
business in Clinton, taking his father's place in its management as far as practicable. One by one, the four big
sawmills of C. Lamb & Sons were closed down as the supply of white pine timber diminished, the last mill going
out of commission October 26, 1904. During the forty-odd years the firm carried on the business, approximately
3,000,000,000 feet of white pine lumber was sawed, besides a vast volume of pickets, shingles and lath. The
closing of the last Lamb mill here did not end the business career of this family. Chancy Lamb, the founder of the
house, died July 12, 1897 and Artemus Lamb in 1901. Lafayette, the surviving brother, was an active and virile
man in many line of business in the middle west, the Rocky mountain district and the Pacific coast. Following are
some of the offices and business interests held by Mr. Lamb before failing health made it necessary for him to
relinquish his business activities: He was president and treasurer of C. Lamb & Sons, and also president of the
following: Lamb-Davis Lumber company, Leavenworth, Wash.; Lamb Lumber company, Minneapolis;
Tumwater Savings bank, Leavenworth, Wash. He was vice president of the Mississippi River Lumber company,
Clinton: director of the American Wire Fabrics company, Clinton; vice president of the Mississippi River
Logging company, Clinton. He was a trustee of the Weyerhauser Timber company, Tacoma, Wash., and vice
president of the Carpenter-Lamb company, Minneapolis; a director of the Chippewa Lumber & Boom company,
Chippewa Lumber Falls, Wis., McCloud River Lumber company, San Francisco; vice president of the People's
Trust & Savings bank, Clinton; a director of the Clinton Gas Light & Coke company, and the Iowa and Illinois
railway, Clinton which later became part of the C.D. & M. line. Mr. Lamb was a stockholder in the People's Trust
and Savings bank, the Clinton National bank, Merchants National bank and Lafayette Hotel, Clinton; Northern
Lumber company, Cloquet, Minn., and the Tampa Hotel company, Tampa, Fla. He held a one-third interest in
one of the biggest ranches in Colorado, known as the Studebaker-Lamb-Witwer ranch, which is nine miles east of
Greeley, and 50 miles of riparian rights on the Platte river. Mr. Lamb married Olivia A. Hufman, of Clinton,
August 21, 1866. To them were born two children, Merrette, wife of Eugene J. Carpenter, of Carpenter-Lamb
company of Minneapolis, and Chancy R. Lamb, of New York city. Mr. Lamb became a Mason in 1870, in
Emulation lodge, 255. He was a member of Keystone chapter and received the Scottish Rite degrees in 1871.
Five years later he took the balance of the York Rite degrees in Holy Cross Commandery, 10, of Clinton. Mr.
Lamb was a member of the Shrine, Knights of Pythias and the Elks. In politics he was a republican, but had never
taken part in the deliberations of his party. He was a Presbyterian and gave liberally to the support of the church.
As a mark of respect to an associate for many years, five banks in Clinton will close Saturday afternoon and
remain closed during the funeral of the late Lafayette Lamb. Those closing are the Clinton National, Clinton
Savings, Merchants' National, City National, and People's Trust & Savings bank.
Clinton people mourn today the passing of a man who because of his personal characteristics was termed friend
by hundreds of men and women, some of whom had been friends of his youth, others acquaintances of later years,
yet all pause to pay tribute to the memory of LaFayette Lamb. Words are many, sentiments of appreciation are
voiced in every group of friends with none more earnest nor more sincere than the comment made by A.G. Smith,
president of the City National bank. Mr. Smith said: "The death of LaFayette Lamb is a distinct loss to the
community. During his life-long residence in Clinton he gained countless friends who held him in the highest
esteem. He was known for his liberality and benevolence, and never neglected an opportunity to befriend the
needy. He was one of our most loyal citizens, always being ready to assist in the promotion of local enterprises
and charitable institutions. C.F. Alden, the last surviving member of the first board of directors of the Peoples
Trust & Savings bank, said this morning, "There is nothing too good to be said of Mr. Lamb. We had been close
friends for years. I came to Clinton in the early '70s and have counted Mr. Lamb one of my friends for nearly
fifty years. No words can express my appreciation of him either as a friend or business associate." He then
commented upon the fact that since the founding of the Peoples Trust & Savings bank, January 25, 1893, there
had been many changes in the directorate until he and Mr. Lamb had been the only ones left. The first directors
were Chancy Lamb, Artemus Lamb, LaFayette Lamb, C.F. Alden, E.P. Welles, Daniel Langan, George B. Young,
P.S. Towle and August M. Ingwersen. George M. Curtis, a friend of more than fifty years, today feels most
keenly the passing of a friend with whom he visited Tuesday. His appreciation of his friend comes from a heart
full of emotion, for he says, "It was my privilege to have intimate business and social relations with Mr. Lafayette
Lamb for more than fifty years. I recognized and admired his splendid character and straightforward business
integrity, together with the kind and gentlemanly qualities, all of which he possessed in an unusual degree and
endeared him to the hearts of all who knew him." He added that no one in Clinton knew Mr. Lamb so far back as
he did and his passing would be mourned not only in Clinton, but in other communities where he had been
identified with business activities. "There are thoughts in our hearts never uttered at all - There are words that
cannot find voice." "Again the Death Angel has called one hence whose identification with the early history of
our city and its prosperity makes it a blow that reaches beyond the fireside; that deepens the cloud of sorrow until
its shadows are fallen over our city. "Mr. Lafayette Lamb has been with us, practically, all his active life. His
friends are legion. Unassuming, generous even to a fault, he had gathered a multitude of friends who mourn his
departure with more real heartache than comes to the most of men. "The words of appreciation that have fallen on
my ear since the sad news rapidly spread through our city have seldom lacked some instance of thoughtful
kindness from his hand, some kindly remembrance extended to the speaker and which had made him a friend
forever. These expressions were from all - no conventionalities had limited his kindnesses. He had been favored
with wealth, but a greater and better fortune was a great, sympathetic and manly heart. "If he could have left to us
a parting word, we believe the following lines would have expressed his thought" 'Don't say that if riches you had
You'd make many happy today Right now you can make people glad If only you'll see it that way Be kind t the
ones that you meet, Be gentle considerate and true, Do the most in the home or the street With what has been
given to you.' "And to these feeble words of appreciation we feel that many hearts will respond and share in our
sorrow at his departure." - L.P. Allen.

1946 History of Clinton Lamb Lafayette 98, 155 - 156

Notes for Olivia L. Hufman
Obituary: Clinton Advertiser Friday January 18, 1924 p. 2 Mrs. Lafayette Lamb passed away yesterday
morning in Pasadena, California, after a serious illness of several weeks. Mrs. Lamb's daughter, Mrs. Eugene J.
Carpenter and her son, Chancy R. Lamb, both of Minneapolis, were with her at the time of her death. Olivia A.
Hufman was married to Lafayette Lamb in Clinton, Iowa, August 21, 1866. Two children were born of this
marriage, Merrette and Chancy R. Mr. Lamb preceded Mrs. Lamb in death, passing away in Clinton May 30,
1917. Besides her son and daughter, Mrs. Lamb leaves two grandchildren, Mrs. Folwell Coan, nee Olivia
Carpenter of Minneapolis. Mrs. Louis Lamb Brooks of Lake Forest, Illinois, and three great grandchildren. For
the past few years Mrs. Lamb has spent the summers with her daughter in Minneapolis and the winters in
California. Mrs. Lamb as the companion of the late Lafayette Lamb, one of Clinton's prominent builders, had a
part in the upbuilding of society in Clinton a half-century, and was a prominent leader in women's activities. She
enjoyed the honor of being a member of a family of Colonial and Indian war soldiers and shared the fraternity of
Mr. Lamb's membership in the Masonic order. The body will be brought to Clinton, but the funeral plans have
not been announced.

Burial: Springdale Cemetery

US Census 26 & 27 April 1910 337 Seventh Avenue Dwelling 264 Family 276 Lamb, Olivia age 61 Married
44 years 2 children 2 living b. Pennsylvania

Children of Lafayette Lamb and Olivia L. Hufman were as follows:
+ 24 i Merrette4 Lamb, born 4 Jun 1867 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 2 Dec 1946 in Hennepin,
Minnesota. She married Eugene Joseph Carpenter.
+ 25 ii Chancy Robert4 Lamb, born 9 Nov 1868 in Iowa. He married Florence Bingham.


10. Emma E.3 Lamb (Chancy2, Artemus1), born 30 Jun 1849 in Big Flats, New York; died 4 Jun 1926 in Clinton,
Clinton, Iowa; buried 7 Jun 1926 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married on 25 Dec 1869 in Clinton, Clinton,
Iowa William E. Young, born 16 Nov 1844 in Syracuse, Onandaga, New York; died 16 Dec 1905; buried in
Clinton, Clinton, Iowa, son of Joseph Crassett Young.

Notes for Emma E. Lamb
Obituary: The Clinton Herald Friday June 4, 1926 Mrs. Emma Lamb Young, widow of William E. Young,
passed away at 6 o'clock this morning at her home, 305 Seventh avenue, her death culminating an illness of two
weeks' duration. Funeral services will be held at -- o'clock Monday afternoon at the late residence, with the Rev.
J.M. Duer, pastor of the First Presbyterian church, officiating. Interment will be in Springdale cemetery. Mrs.
Young, who was aged 76 years, 11 months and four days, was a member of the Clinton chapter Daughters of the
American Revolution, and of the Clinton Woman's club. She was especially revered in Clinton because of her
charitable contributions, her local philanthropies for public institutions, especially her gifts to the new Jane Lamb
Memorial hospital, having been extremenly generous. Emma E. Lamb was born June 30, 1849, the daughter of
Chancy and Jane Bevier Lamb, the former a pioneer lumber man of Clinton and owner and operator of the C.
Lamb lumber yard and saw mills, later known as the C. Lamb & Sons mills upon the entry of two sons, Artemus
and Lafayette Lamb, into the business. Born in Big Flats, N.Y., she came west and to Clinton with her parents in
1856. For a time before settling here, her father was engaged in farming near Argo-Fa in Illinois. She was
married December 25, 1869, at the age of 20 years, to William E. Young, who was at that time a member of the
firm of Young-Ewing, a grocery concern. He later became associated with Mrs. Young's father and brothers in
the mills, entering their offices in 1879 in a responsible position, which he held until his death in 1907. She was
the mother of one child, Grace, who was married to M.B. Poole of Chicago. She also preceded her mother in
death, some few years ago. Mrs. Young is the last of a family of six children, Artemus, Lafayette, Augusta
(Ware), Celeste and Merrette. She leaves no immediate relatives with the exception of a granddaughter, Miss
Dorothy Poole, formerly of Chicago, now of Pasadena, Calif. Mrs. Young is known throughout Clinton as a
donor to all worthy causes and has given, perhaps more than any one other person, donations for the benefit of
local institutions and personal aid to many worthy young people of the city for furtherance of education. She
gave the ground upon which the Carnegie library stands, built the nurses' home at Jane Lamb hospital and also
presented a large sum of money to the hospital board at the time of the recent remodeling and extension of the
building. These are only a few of the charitable acts of her life. Her benefactions to Jane Lamb hosptial alone are
estimated at more than a quarter of a million dollars in the last ten years, while the total of her benevolences to
other institutions and individuals has not been estimated. She was ever ready and gave liberally to worthy causes
and to deserving and needy persons. Mrs. Young was associated with the First Presbyterian church and
interested in its activities. She was a member of the Women's club and the Clinton chapter of the Daughters of
the American Revolution, being herself a daughter of a daughter of the revolution, her grandfather on her mother's
side of the family having been an American soldier in the Revolution. She was favored through life with a host of
warm friends and acquaintances owing to her many commendable attributes and her passing will be mourned by
the community at large. During the period of her critical illness and when word of her death was circulated about
the city, numerous tributes to her memory as a woman of extraordinary charity were voiced. Mrs. H.W. Seaman,
president of Jane Lamb hospital board of directors, speaking not only for herself but for the board as a whole,
hearing of Mrs. Young's death said: "We shall certainly miss our friend and benefactor and greatly mourn her
passing. She has always been a most dear friend and truly a good angel at Jane Lamb hospital where she not only
built our nurses' home but also furnished funds at various times for additions to the building besides donating so
much to the recent new addition. Of her we can truthfully say, she was always generously sweet and unassuming
and truly interested in doing good for the benefit of others". "It was a most pleasing characteristic of Mrs. Young,
that whenever she was thanked for some kind act or a donation of cash value, she took the attitude of belittling her
own part in enterprises and showed only a joy in being able to give and do for others, rather than to take the stand
that since she had helped financially, she should be considered first. It was for others always that she thought",
Mrs. Seaman concluded. "As I think back thirty years of more in my connection with the hospital and other
institutions", said E.M. Howes, who as chairman of the board of trustees of Jane Lamb Memorial Hospital
association directed the improvements made possible by Mrs. Young's gift, "the sweet and lovely things that Mrs.
Young has been continually doing for them come to my mind and I remember how many things it has been
possible to do that could not have been done had it not been fo her assistance. "The include practically a new Jane
Lamb hospital, then the nurses' home and constant improvements, year after year that have enabled the hospital to
care for patients in a way it would not have been possible to do without her aid. And as I look back over my life I
can reall many nice things the members of the Lamb family have been doing for Clinton." From Attorney F.W.
Ellis, who has been closely associated with Mrs. Young in her legal and business affairs, The Herald is privileged
to print the tribute that appears in an adjoining column. It is a voicing in one of all of the many tributes given
utterance today in many quarters.
In Memoriam Emma Lamb Young (By F.W. Ellis) Death comes to every home in the land, cold, stern and
inexorable. Neither the might of empires nor the power of wealth can stop its final triumph. It is, however, just
as natural as birth and life. Some one has written, "Death knocks alike at the door of the palace and the cottage
gate." This time His summons came to a quiet home where lived a dear old lady, whose name is a synonym for
charity and kindness. Emma Lamb Young in the beautiful springtime, but in the autumn of life, has gone to her
reward. "Her passing seemed but the fitting close to a harmonious and benignant life. As the inevitable
feebleness of advancing years crept over her the ties binding her to earth were slowly and tenderly loosened and
she drifted peacefully down the stream secure in the certaintly of reaching a safe harbor in the end." "But through
the sun of her youth had long since set, the lovely afterglow with its own soft radiance kept an atmosphere of
warmth and brightness always around her." Mrs. Young was blest with an unusual kind and sympathetic nature
which drew friends about her, whose affection she retained. The trials of humanity, even the humble, had a strong
apeal, and her beneficences poured forth in a stream of love and kindness. Her greatest happiness in life was
helping others of whom she always thought first and of herself last. It is the noblest and most laudable distinction
of the human family, frequently exercised but generally not known until such a rare character has gone into the
great unknown. Her greatest wealth was in her care and thoughtfulness of others. Riches beyond measure she
possessed in the memory of those who knew her, which neither mother rust can corrupt or destroy. "Many
occasions come to all of us, in the ordinary paths of our life, in our home and by our firesides, wherein we may
act as nably as if, all our life long, we led armies, sat in senates or visited beds of sickness and pain. Varying and
almost every hour the occasions will come in which we can subdue our hearts to gentleness and patience, resign
our own interests for another's advantage, speak words of kindness and of wisdom, raise the fallen, cheer the
fainting and sick in spirit and soften and assuage the weariness and bitterness of their mortal lot. Theres is
opportunity enough for these. They cannot be written on the tomb; but they will be written deep in the hearts of
men, of friends, of children, of kindred, in the book of great account, and in their eternal influences on the great
page of the Universe." Time passes and changes the envelope of humanity, but the thought of her we knew is not
changed. Her open mind, warm heart and free hand multiplying her beneficences and goodness, live and blossom
in the

Notes for William E. Young
1911 Wolf's History of Clinton p. 662-663 Among the highly honored and well remembered residents of
Clinton, Iowa, of a past generation, was William E. Young, whose successful and praiseworthy career has been
brought to a close, but whose influence still pervades the lives of those who knew him best, for he was a man who
delighted in doing good to others and assisting his neighbors and friends to succeed while laboring for his own
advancement. He became well and most favorably known throughout the county and is eminently deserving of
conspicuous mention in the history of this locality. William E. Young was a native of the old Empire state, from
whence came so many of the sterling citizens to the new commonwealth of the West. His birth occurred in
Syracuse, New York, November 16, 1844, and when he was eleven years of age he was brought to the West by
his father, Joseph Crassett Young, now deceased, long one of Clinton county's prominent citizens, a full sketch of
whom appears on another page of this work. The Young family has figured conspicuously in the affairs of
Clinton from the year they first settled here, 1835, to the present time, always ready to do their full duty as
citizens and they justly earned the rewards that always come to the diligent and worthy. William E. Young
received such education as he could in the schools of his time and in 1855 he located in Clinton, Iowa, with his
father, whose grocery store he entered as a clerk upon reaching manhood, and soon became familiar with the
business, his courtesy and energy doing much to build up a large trade with the town and surrounding country.
Later he became associated with the late Amos G. Ewing and they successfully conducted a grocery store on
Second street. In the year 1879, Mr. Young entered the employ of C. Lamb & Sons, and was identified with the
firm in a responsible capacity until his death. He was a man of large business interests and was a supporter of his
home city, though his disposition was quiet and reserved and he did not take a prominent part in political or
municipal affairs. He was one of those stanch and sterling citizens who was of inestimable value to the
community. He made friends easily, and thus in his long residence in Clinton came to be known as one of her
most infulential citizens. He had been in failing health for some time prior to his death, but he bore his sufferings
manfully and was never heard to complain. Mr. Young was a member of the Masonic order, blue lodge, chapter
and commandery, and of the Clinton lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of
Pythias. He was a member of the Wapsipinicon club. In all these he was active and prominent. On December
25, 1869, William E. Young was married to Emma E. Lamb, daughter of C. Lamb, who is mentioned elsewhere
in this work. Mrs. Young survives, and she is a favorite with a host of warm friends and acquaintances owning to
her many commendable attributes. She is the mother of one child, a daughter, Grace, born December 29, 1872,
who received a good education and has long been popular in the best social circles. She married M.B. Poole, a
well known citizen here, whose death occurred in April 1907.

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Saturday December 16, 1905 p. 1 William E. Young of 305 Seventh avenue,
one of Clinton's best known residents, died shortly after 4 o'clock this morning. The intelligence of his death was
heard with sorrow and surprise by his many friends, who, though knowing that Mr. Young had been ailing for
years, and had been seriously ill during the past two weeks, were not prepared to learn of his death, which was
very sudden, the members of his family having had no intimation of the approaching end until was close at hand.
Mrs. M.B. Poole of Chicago, daughter of the deceased, was at once notified of her father's death, and arrived in
Clinton today. William E. Young was born in Syracuse, New York, November 16th, 1844, and when he was
eleven years of age was brought to the west by his father, J.C. Young, who survives him and is numbered among
Clinton's old and respected residents today. In the year 1855 the latter settled in Clinton and the decedent had
since been a resident of this city. He attended the local schools as a boy, and upon reaching early manhood
entered his father's grocery store as a clerk. Later he became associated with the late Amos G. Ewing, they
conducing a grocery store on Second street. In the year 1879 Mr. Young entered the employ of C. Lamb & Sons,
and was identified with that firm in a responsible capacity until the time of his death. Mr. Young was afflicted for
years and a great sufferer from rheumatism, but he bore his sufferings manfully and was never heard to complain.
His nature was genial and kind, and he made friends easily; and thus in his long residence in Clinton came to be
one of her best known residents. He was a man of large business interests and was an enthusiastic supporter of
his home city, though his disposition was quiet and reserved, and he did not take a prominent part in political or
municipal affairs; he was one of those staunch and sterling citizens whom Clinton or any city can ill afford to
lose. Mr. Young was a member of the Masonic orders, Blue Lodge Chapter and Commandery, and of the Clinton
lodge of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. He also was a member of the Wapsipinicon club. Surviving him are his
wife and daughter, and his father. The funeral, which friends are invited to attend, will be held from the residence
at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon. Interment will be private. Friends will please refrain from sending flowers.

Burial: Springdale Cemetery

Children of Emma E. Lamb and William E. Young were as follows:
+ 26 i Grace4 Young, born 1873 in Iowa; died 11 Mar 1907; buried in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She
married Marvin B. Pool.

Generation 4

13. Emma Rena4 Lamb (Artemus3, Chancy2, Artemus1), born 6 Dec 1866 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 7 Feb
1945 in Phoenix, Maricopa, Arizona; buried in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married in Oct 1893 Marvin J.
Gates, born 19 May 1863 in Cedar Rapids, Linn, Iowa; died 6 Feb 1905 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried 8 Feb
1905 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa.

Notes for Emma Rena Lamb
Clinton Co. Wills Gates Emma Lamb Book 12 Page 341

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Wednesday February 7, 1945 p. 8 Mrs. Emma Lamb Gates, 549 Fifth Avenue
South, widow of the late Marvin J. Gates, died at 7:45 o'clock this morning in Phoenix, Ariz., following a
prolonged illness. The body will be brought to Clinton for burial in Springdale cemetery, but funeral
arrangements have not yet been completed. Mrs. Gates was the mother of Artemus Gates, assistant U.S. secretary
of the navy for air, and also of Mrs. Laurence A. Murphy, nee Miss Henrietta Gates, and of John N. Gates, both
now of Moline, Ill. During her life time residence in this city, Mrs. Gates always took an active interest in civic
and social affairs of the city, and was the first woman to serve as a member of the board of education of the
Clinton independent school district. She was a member of the First Presbyterian church and held membership in
the Clinton Country club auxiliary, and also was interested in young people and their activities. Mrs. Gates,
daughter of Artemus Lamb and Hanrietta Smith Lamb, was born in Clinton Dec. 6, 1866. Her marriage to Marvin
J. Gates took place in 1892. He preceded her in death in 1905, and a son, Garrett Gates, died some years ago.
Among survivors are four grandchildren, Miss Diane and Miss Cynthia Gates, New York City, and Garrett and
Sheila Murphy, Moline; a sister, Mrs. Clare McCoy, Clinton, and a cousin, Mrs. Fred H. Van Allen, Clinton. Her
daughter, Mrs. Murphy, and her sister, Mrs. McCoy, were at her bedside.

Notes for Marvin J. Gates
Clinton Age 07 Feb 1905 The Passing of Marvin J. GATES Succumbs at His Home Yesterday Afternoon
After Short Illness. Has Been Prominent Business Man of This City for the Past Five Years.
Eleven o'clock yesterday marked the hour of the passing of Marvin J. GATES one of Clinton's prominent business
men. Although Mr. GATES had been ailing for some months it was not thought to be of a serious nature and his
death yesterday came as a sudden shock to the entire city and especially to those who met him on the street
Saturday and conversed with him. A man of sterling business qualities who has for the past five years been
deeply interested in the business welfare of this city and was a prominent figure in the social world, his death is
felt keenly and the entire city extend sympathy to the bereaved members of his family. He was connected with
the American Wire Cloth factory as treasurer of the company; was secretary of the Iowa Granite Brick company;
a director of the Iowa and Illinois Interurban; a member of the Cromwell Hotel company, a director of the
National Papier Mache factory and one of the owners of the Clinton theatre. In other than monetary ways was
Mr. GATES interested in Clinton's welfare. He was a member of the board of trustees of the Clinton public
library, and also a most active member of the Y. M. C. A. building committee, working zealously and untiringly
in the interests of the new building. Unfortunately nearly all of the members of the Lamb family were out of the
city yesterday at the time of his death and are making all haste to return. J. D. LAMB and Mr. and Mrs. R. B.
MCCOY are in Chicago, from which city they will return this evening. G. E. LAMB and F. W. ELLIS are in
Davenport, Mrs. Artemus LAMB and Mr. and Mrs. Lafayette LAMB are in southern California.
Obituary.
Marvin J. GATES was born in the city of Cedar Rapids in the month of May, 1864, and resided in that city the
greater part of his life. He was married in October, 1893, to Miss Emma LAMB, daughter of the late Artemus
LAMB. The young couple made their home in Cedar Rapids until five years ago, when they moved to Clinton.
To this marriage have been born four children, three sons, Artemus, John and Garrett, and a daughter, little
Henrietta. Funeral services will be held at the home at Oakhurst, Wednesday morning at ten o'clock and will be
private. Friends outside of the family are requested not to send flowers.
09 Feb 1905
Yesterday the last sad rites were observed in memory of the late Marvin J. GATES. The funeral services were
conducted by the Rev. Hiram FOULKES after which the remains were laid to rest in the Springdale cemetery.

Children of Emma Rena Lamb and Marvin J. Gates were as follows:
+ 27 i Artemus Lamb5 Gates, born 3 Nov 1895 in Cedar Rapids, Linn, Iowa; died 14 Jun 1976 in
Long Island, New York. He married Alice T. Davison.
28 ii John N.5 Gates, born 1898 in Iowa.
29 iii Garrett D.5 Gates, born 4 Jan 1899; died 9 Sep 1921; buried 13 Sep 1921 in Clinton,
Clinton, Iowa. Notes: Obituary: The Advertiser, Tuesday, September 13, 1921 Funeral
services for Garrett Gates were held at the family home, Oakhurst, this morning at 10:30
o'clock, with Rev. H.J. Rendall, Presbyterian, officiation. Mrs. E.L. Miller and Mrs. H.H.
Hobart were the soloists. Interment was in Springdale cemetery with short services, when the
young man was laid beside the body of his father, the late M.J. Gates. Those attending the
casket were Robert Smith, Marvin Jacobsen, Jack Jewett, F.H. Atkins, C.I. McKone, and
Albert McCoy, assisted by F.H. Van Allen and C.A. Armstrong. Colonel J.W. Dows and
Mrs. E.H. Smith of Cedar Rapids, and Mr. C.B. Mills of Minneapolis were in attendence at
the services. Artemus Gates, brother of the deceased, and his fiance, Miss Alice Davidson, of
New York City, are in the city. John Gates, brother, who is in Oregon, was unable to be
present.
+ 30 iv Henrietta5 Gates, born 1903 in Iowa. She married Laurence A. Murphy.


15. James Dwight4 Lamb (Artemus3, Chancy2, Artemus1), born 25 Jun 1871 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 12
May 1905 in near Bellevue, Jackson, Iowa; buried 15 May 1905 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. He married on 5 Oct
1892 Mollie Ankeny, born 1870 in Iowa; died aft 1924, daughter of Dr. Augustus L. Ankeny and Valerie M.
Perrin.

Notes for James Dwight Lamb
1911 Wolfe's History of Clinton Lamb, James D., 1030 No man has ever lived in Clinton county who left a
more indelible imprint of his sterling characteristics upon the hearts of friends and acquaintances than the late
James Dwight Lamb, who was summoned to close his earthly accounts and take up his abode "in the windowless
palaces of rest" while in the full flush and zenith of his young manhood. His career was one of which any family
should be proud, for it showed what right principles, properly directed, could accomplish and how excellent a
thing it is to live up to hight ideals. Mr. Lamb was born in Clinton, Iowa, June 25, 1871, and was the second son
of the late Artemus Lamb, deceased, who was the founder of the firm of C. Lamb & Sons, one of the largest
lumber milling firms in the Mississippi valley and which made the name of Clinton widely known. This family
has been prominent in all the relations of life in this locality since the pioneer days. Dwight Lamb, as he was
familiary known, enjoyed the advantages of a liberal education, having attended school at Exeter, New
Hampshire, and later at Orchard Lake, Michigan. His tastes were for an active business career and while still a
young man his father gave him a position in the office of mill D, the Chancy mill of the firm of C. Lamb & Sons.
Mr. Lamb learned the business thoroughly and in a few years became manager of this branch of the business,
retaining the active control until the close of the mill. Meanwhile he had become interested in machinery.
Mechanism was not only his hobby, but became his absorbing passion. Beginning with an interest in the Clinton
Separator Works, he developed the business until it grew into the Lamb Boat & Engine Company, of which he
was president and promoter. The business of this firm has traveled far and wide; branch offices have been
established in Chicago, St. Louis, Milwaukee and New York City and through them the Lamb engines and his
latest model, the torpedo stern launch and cruisers, have been sold in many states of the Union. With the advent
of automobiles he took up this branch of mechanism, establishing the first and only garage, for some time,
conducted in the city and in this portion of the state. The winter before his death saw the incorporation of the
Lamb Automobile Company, with J.D. Lamb as president, and the building of a handsome permanent building for
a garage and repair shop. There were other interests in Clinton with which he was more or less actively
identified. These interests in Clinton with which he was more or less actively identified. These interests included
a directorship in the Peoples Trust and Savings Bank, a directorship in the City National Bank, also in the Iowa &
Illinois Railroad Company, of which he was treasurer, and an interest in the Clinton theater. He had a genius for
organization and promoting concerns and he was very successful in whatever he turned his attention to, being a
man of keen observation, a clear, analytical mind and able, with remarkable accuracy, to forecast the outcome of a
present transaction. In social and lodge circles, Mr. Lamb was a prominent figure, being a member of the
Wapsipinicon Club, and he was a thirty-second-degree Mason, belonging to the blue lodge, the Royal Arch
chapter, the Knights Templar, the DeMolay Consistory and also a member of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles
of the Mystic Shrine; he was, in addition, a charter member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. On
October 5, 1892, James D. Lamb was married to Mollie Ankeny, daughter of Mrs. Valeria M. Ankeny and a
descendent of two of the first families of the state. To them were born three children, Celeste, Valeria and
Artemus, the latter being the only male minor of the name of Lamb. The home life of this paractical millionaire
was one of great happiness. He had an ideal home, a beautiful and magnificent residence which he built at
Woodlands, attractive, well kept, elegantly furnished and often the scene of hospitality and a favorite mecca for a
large circle of admiriing friends and acquaintances. The death of this distinguished citizen was a tragic one, he
having been drowned on May 12, 1905, having accidentally fallen off the cruiser "Margaret," a boat which had
just been turned out by the Lamb Boat & Engine Works, the accident occuring on her trial trip on the Mississippi
rover near Bellevue. His death came as a great shock to the people of Clinton, for he was a man whose
personality made itself felt. He was a rich man, but not one of the idle rich, his wealth being turned to good
account. He was an extensive manufacturer, and interested citizen in everything that redounded to the welfare of
Clinton, and he was never too busy to listen to or assist in promoting some public measure benefit. His place in
the industrial world of Clinton and eastern Iowa will be a very hard one to fill. He can be seen by mortal eyes no
longer, but - thanks for the assurance of hope - upon the great ocean of eternity, his life, not in the embrace of
sleep or in the apparent selfishness of rest, will be in activity of service in a higher and nobler sphere. And so
another active, earnest, intellect is stilled; another toiling life ended. Helpless, we pause at its close, and then
attempt to tell the story of the years of labor, ambition and success which marked an eventful career. Those left
behind can only cherish his memory and emulate his virtues.

Obituary: The Clinton Daily Herald May 13, 1905 A wave of suppressed horror swept over the entire city
last evening when the first news reached here of the drowning off the cruiser Margaret of James Dwight Lamb.
Although the details of the disaster did not reach Clinton until some hours after the casualty, the news traveled
from one end of the city to the other with incredible swiftness. Mr. Lamb had joined the party taken out by John
H. Bradley of Dubuque in his new boat which had just been turned out from the docks of the Lamb Boat and
Engine Works, a finished product. A detailed description of the craft, of which the makers were pardonable proud
appeared in the Herald of Friday's issue. J.F. Pethybridge, who was on the board and one of the witnesses to the
tragedy, says that the accident occurred while the boat was running northward about five and one half miles south
of Bellevue. The particular spot is nearly a mile north of the mouth of the Maquoketa river and at the second
signal light north of Sun Prairie. Mr. Lamb had been piloting the boat all the afternoon, the Margaret having left
Clinton at 9 o'clock in the morning and stopping at Sabula for dinner. It was about half past four o'clock. He had
given the wheel on the upper deck over to his pilot, Clyde Welch, the regular man who goes with him on his trial
cruises. Mr. Lamb descended to the lower deck for just a minute or two, returned to the upper pilot house and
asked the pilot which point he steered for at that place. The pilot showed him, and he responded that he steered
for the same place. He then picked up an armed camp chair which was placed near the wheel and walked to one
side evidently intending to sit near the railing. The chair must have tipped when he attempted to sit in it, for the
pilot thought he heard him say "Clyde, I am going," he turned and Mr. Lamb was out of sight. The boat was
immediately reversed, put about and Mr. Lamb was seen to rise for a second only at the surface of the water, lying
on one side and partly out of the water. The chair floated not far away form him, but he was fully 100 feet away
from the boat which had been going up stream at a rapid rate, while the force of the rapid current had carried him
down stream. For some little time the watchers looked about and then started for Bellevue where every boat and
clamdigger available were sent back to continue the search. The men dragged the river at this point and below
until two o'clock this morning, when darkness put a stop to their operations. At daybreak work was resumed. The
rivermen at Bellevue are confident that they will find the body which was lost in a depth of about twenty-five feet
of water, and about a mile below there is a pocket over forty feet deep, which they will search. The Artemus
Gates left Clinton at 8 o'clock last evening and reached the scene of the disaster about midnight. Then the
Chaperon and Summer Girl appeared on the scene and their crew was added to the searching force. This morning
the Gates returned to Clinton at an early hour, bringing the Summer Girl, leaving the Chaperon below Bellevue.
Garrett Lamb, who had started for the northwest, was recalled and came down on a special from north of
Minneapolis, returning via the river to the other boats of the fleet. Lafayette Lamb, who had started with him,
also returned to the city. James Dwight Lamb was born in the city of Clinton June 25, 1871, and was the second
son of the late Artemus Lamb and a grandson of Chancy Lamb, deceased, who was the founder of the firm of C.
Lamb & Sons, one of the largest lumber milling firms in the Mississippi valley and which made the name of
Clinton widely known. As he was familiarly known, Dwight Lamb attended school at Exeter, N.H., and later at
Orchard Lake, Mich. His tastes were for an active business career and while still a young man his father gave him
a position in the office of Mill D, the Chancy Mill of the firm of C. Lamb & Sons. Mr. Lamb learned the business
thoroughly and in a few years became manager of this branch of the business retaining this active control until the
close of the mill. Meanwhile he had become interested in machinery. Mechanism was not only his hobby but
became his absorbing passion. Beginning with an interest in the Clinton Separator Works, he developed the
business until it grew into the Lamb Boat and Engine company of which he was president and promoter. The
business of this firm has traveled far and wide; branch offices have been established in Chicago, St. Louis,
Milwaukee and New York City and through them the Lamb engines and his latest model the torpedo stern launch
and cruisers have been sold in many states in the Union. With the advent of automobiles, he took up this branch
of mechanism establishing the first and only garage conducted in the city and in this portion of the state. The
winter just passed saw the incorporation of the Lamb Automobile Company with J.D. Lamb as president and the
building of a handsome permanent building for a garage and repair shop. There were other interests in the city
with which he was more or less actively identified. These interests include a directorship in the Peoples Trust and
Savings bank, a directorship in the City National bank, also in the I. & I. railway, of which he was treasurer, and
interest in the Clinton theatre and an interest in the Cromwell Hotel company. In social and lodge circles Mr.
Lamb was a member of the Wapsipinicon club and a 32nd degree Mason, belonging to the Blue Lodge, the Royal
Arch chapter, the Knights Templar, the DeMolay consistory and also a member of the Mystic Shrine. He was in
addition a charter member of the B.P.O.E. On the fifth day of October 1892, J.D. Lamb was married to Miss
Mollie Ankeny and a descendent of two of the first families of the state. To them have been born three children,
Celeste, Valeria and Artemus, and this little heir of less than four months of age is the only male minor of the
name of Lamb. The home life of this practical millionaire was one of great happiness. Within the last decade a
beautiful residence on the wooded heights west of the city had been prepared for them, and at Woodlands was an
ideal home. To this home has come a sorrow crushing and overwhelming. Of the family of Artemus Lamb, there
are now left his widow, one son, Garrett E. Lamb and two daughters, Mrs. Marvin J. Gates and Mrs. Russell B.
McCoy. To them all the silent sympathy of the entire community has gone out in this terrible and crushing
bereavement. Throughout this city today there are none but expressions of sorrow and sincere regret at the
untimely taking from its midst of one of its sterling citizens. J.D. Lamb was a man whose personality made itself
felt. He was a rich man, but not one of the idle rich, his wealth was turned to good account. He was a
manufacturer, an interested citizen in everything that redounded to the welfare of this city and he was never too
busy to listen to or assist in promoting some public measure benefit. Down at the Lamb Boat and Engine works,
the hum of busy wheels was stilled this morning and strong workmen walked about with sobs and shaking their
sturdy shoulders and tears falling unchecked from their eyes. That was a testimonial that a manufacturer seldom
receives from the men whom he employs. "He was the salt of the earth," said a business man from Davenport,
who had come to Clinton to see Mr. Lamb on business this morning. "His place in the industrial work of this city
will be a hard one to fill." And all of this tribute comes to a young man who not yet attained the fullness of 34
years of life. There was so much of good possible in his future that Clinton mourns for him sincerely and deeply.
The Clinton Herald May 15, 1905 p. 3 This afternoon at half past two o'clock private funeral services for the late
James Dwight Lamb were conducted at the home at Woodlands. A former rector of St. John's Episcopal church,
the Rev. C.A. Riley, of Madison, Wisconsin, assisted by the Rev. Allen Judd, priest in charge at St. John's
conducted the simple but beautiful and impressive Episcopal burial rites. Then the cortege wended its way slowly
down the hills and on to God's acre, where the final resting place was chosen by his father and grandfather before
him. At noon the principal business houses of the city closed their doors, the banks of the city also closed, many
of the offices until after the hour of interment. This was done in respect to Mr. Lamb's memory. Today in
Clinton is as Saturday, one of general depression. Throughout the city the feeling of loss is intensified, and the
mourning for one of its leading citizens is deep and sincere. This morning from ten until twelve o'clock all friends
of the family and the employees and business associates of Mr. Lamb were received at the house and given an
opportunity to pay their last tribute to his memory. The men from the Lamb Boat and Engine Works went in a
body to show their sympathy and respect to his memory. Mr. Lamb's body was recovered from the Mississippi
river by Ellinghouse Bros. of Bellevue. It was taken from the water, 1,000 feet below where the accident had
occurred and had rested in twenty feet of water. This was at 4:40 p.m. Saturday and Mr. Lamb's watch which had
stopped at 4:41 o'clock showed that twenty-four hours lacking one minute had elapsed. The remains were taken
upon the steamer Chaperon which with Garrett E. Lamb on board had remained at the place and brought at once
to this city. They were viewed by Coroner Hullinger and this morning an inquest was held at which time all the
formalities of the law were met.

Burial: Springdale Cemetery

Notes for Mollie Ankeny
US Census 21 April 1910 Clinton Twp. Bluff Road Dwelling 75 Family 77 Young, Molly A. age 40 Married
(2) 1 year 3 children 3 living b. Iowa Own Income

Children of James Dwight Lamb and Mollie Ankeny were as follows:
31 i Celeste5 Lamb, born 1901 in Iowa. Notes: US Census 21 April 1910 Clinton Twp. Bluff
Road Dwelling 75 Family 77 Lamb, Celeste age 9 b. Iowa
32 ii Valeria5 Lamb, born 1904 in Iowa. She married Jack Thornton. Notes: US Census 21
April 1910 Clinton Twp. Bluff Road Dwelling 75 Family 77 Lamb, Valeria age 6 b. Iowa
33 iii Artemus5 Lamb, born 1905 in Iowa. Notes: US Census 21 April 1910 Clinton Twp. Bluff
Road Dwelling 75 Family 77 Lamb, Artemus age 5 b. Iowa SS Death Index ARTEMUS D
LAMB 20 Jan 1905 15 Jan 1998 (V) XX958 (U.S. Consulate: EL SALVADOR (SAN
SALVADOR)) (none specified) 554-14-1086 California


16. Clara Augusta4 Lamb (Artemus3, Chancy2, Artemus1), born 30 Apr 1874 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 3
Mar 1955 in Tucson, Pima, Arizona; buried 7 Mar 1955 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married in 1899 Russell
Belknap McCoy, born Nov 1871 in Ohio; died 1922; buried in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa, son of Albert Russell
McCoy and Frances Fannie Congar.

Notes for Clara Augusta Lamb
US Census 7 June 1900 SD 2 ED 9 Sheet 9B Second Ward 402 5th Avenue Dwelling 183 Family 192
McCoy, Claral b. Apr. 1874 age 26 Married 1 years 0 children 0 living b. Iowa
US Census 21 April 1910 Clinton Twp. Bluff Road Dwelling 72 Family 74 McCoy, Clara age 35 Married 11
years 2 children 2 living b. Iowa

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Saturday March 5, 1955 p. 8 Funeral services for Mrs. Russell B. McCoy, 80,
of 434 1/2 6th Ave. S., who died Thursday at Tucson, Ariz., are planned for 11 a.m. Monday at the Bragonier-Fay
funeral home. Dr. Bruce McCullough of the First Presbyterian church will officiate. Burial will be in Springdale
cemetery. Friends may call at the funeral home beginning at 1 p.m. Sunday. The former Clara Lamb, daughter of
Artemus and Henrietta S. Lamb, was born April 30, 1874, in Clinton. She attended Wells college, Aurora, N.Y.
and was married to Russell B. McCoy, April 26, 1899. Mrs. McCoy was a charter member of the Clinton county
chapter, American Red Cross, and a member of the former board of lady managers of Jane Lamb hospital and the
Agatha circle. She also served on the Salvation Army board for many years. During World War I she was active
in canteen work and was in charge of classes for rolling bandages. She was also active in home service during
World War II. Surviving are a son, Albert R. McCoy, Cincinnati, Ohio; two granddaughters, Mrs. J.F. (Jane
McCoy) Daschbach, Grand Detour, Ill., and Mrs. Crawford L. (Katherine) McCoy, Lewiston, Idaho. Her
husband, a son, Lafayette, and a grandson, Crawford L. McCoy, preceded her in death.

Notes for Russell Belknap McCoy
US Census 7 June 1900 SD 2 ED 9 Sheet 9B Second Ward 402 5th Avenue Dwelling 183 Family 192
McCoy, Russell b. Nov. 1870 age 29 Married 1 years b. Iowa Lawyer
US Census 21 April 1910 Clinton Twp. Bluff Road Dwelling 72 Family 74 McCoy, Russell B. age 38 Married 11
years b. Illinois Lawyer

Children of Clara Augusta Lamb and Russell Belknap McCoy were as follows:
+ 34 i Albert R.5 McCoy, born 1902 in Iowa; died 1957. He married Dorothy Jane Noble.
35 ii Lafayette Lamb Pudge5 McCoy, born 15 Feb 1909 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 6 Mar
1922 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried 8 Mar 1922 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. Notes: US
Census 21 April 1910 Clinton Twp. Bluff Road Dwelling 72 Family 74 McCoy, Lafayette L.
age 1 b. Iowa Obituary: The Clinton Herald Tuesday March 7, 1922 p. 6 Death came into the
home of Mr. and Mrs. Russell Belknap McCoy at Breezy Point yesterday afternoon, taking
therefrom the younger son, Lafayette Lamb McCoy, known to every one in the city as
"Pudge," a lovable cherry chap. He had been ill for two weeks with an abscess in the ear and
was apparently recovering; Sunday morning septic pneumonia developed, so rapidly that
neither science nor nursing could do aught to stay its ravages and he passed away at 6:20
o'clock Monday, March 6. He was born February 15, 1909, at Breezy Point, was until his
illness a student in the eighth grade classes in the Junior High school and had been entered for
Hotchkiss Academy, Connecticut, in the fall. Although but 13 years of age very recently and
stalwart for his years, "Pudge" was an inveterate reader and student and it was necessary to
divert his attention from books to music and out of door sports. He loved athletics, coasting,
skiing, skating and was one of the happiest of the boys and girls who daily visited the
municipal rink. Yet with all his boyishness he had the heart and manner of a gentleman,
courteous to his elders, kindly, and so thoroughly a comrade with his school boy friends that
he was considered a pal by hundreds of lads whom his parents will never know. He was just
a real American boy whose passing the community mourns, because of his personal charm
and his great possibilities. Funeral services will be at the home tomorrow afternoon at 2:30
o'clock, to be conducted by the Rev. James Magnus Duer of the First Presbyterian church.
Burial will be in Springdale cemetery.


21. Celeste "Nettie"4 Ware (Augusta3 Lamb, Chancy2, Artemus1), born Dec 1870 in Iowa; died 24 Mar 1926;
buried 26 Mar 1926 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married in May 1899 Frank Walcott Ellis, born 4 May 1865
in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 14 Feb 1949 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; buried 16 Feb 1949 in Clinton, Clinton,
Iowa, son of Judge Lyman A. Ellis and Mary Buckley.

Notes for Celeste "Nettie" Ware
US Census 13 June 1900 SD 2 ED 9 Sheet 19 Second Ward 318 6th Avenue Dwelling 409 Family 435 Ellis,
Celeste b. Dec. 1870 age 29 Married 0 years 1 child 1 living b. Iowa
US Census 30 April 1910 Clinton Twp. 318 Sixth Avenue Dwelling 425 Family 445 Ellis, Celeste age 40 Married
11 years 1 child 1 living b. Iowa

Obituary: The Clinton Advertiser, Friady March 26, 1926 p. 6 Mrs. Frank W. Ellis was laid to rest in
Springdale cemetery this afternoon after funeral services at the home, 318 Sixth avenue, conducted by Rev.
Thomas Horton, D.D., rector of St. John's Episcopal church. Mrs. H.H. Hobart, soprano and Donald Leslie, tenor,
accompanied by Mrs. J.A. Lubbers, sang "Crossing the Bar." Serving as pallbearers were Ben Reter, H.B.
Dewell, K.D. Slocum, L.M. Jefferies, E.O. Work, R.M. Long, H.R. Boles, W.W. Heldt. Here for the funeral from
out of town were: Mrs. Jane Wainwright, Louisville, Ky. Dr. and Mrs. Lyman M. Ellis, Chicago, Mrs. Mercedes
Cottle, New York City.

Notes for Frank Walcott Ellis
US Census 13 June 1900 SD 2 ED 9 Sheet 19 Second Ward 318 6th Avenue Dwelling 409 Family 435 Ellis,
Frank W. b. May 1865 age 35 Married 0 years b. Iowa
US Census 30 April 1910 Clinton Twp. 318 Sixth Avenue Dwelling 425 Family 445 Ellis, Frank W. age 44
Married 11 years b. Iowa

The Clinton Weekly Age Vol. 26 No. 24 Friday June 12, 1896 p. 3 Frank Ellis came in from the east Monday
evening.

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Monday February 14, 1949 p. 18 Frank W. Ellis, 83, dean of Clinton attorneys,
president of the Clinton Street Railway company and a leader in civic and Masonic affairs for many years died at
3 a.m. today in Jane Lamb hospital, where he had submitted to major surgery on Thursday. Funeral services will
be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday in the Scottish Rite temple, where Rose Croix services will be conducted. The Rev.
R.T. Dickerson, pastor of St. John's Episcopal church, will officiate at funeral rites. Burial will be in Springdale
cemetery. The body reposes in the Bragonier-Fay funeral home. Mr. Ellis, who lived at 960 North Fourth street,
was honored by the Clinton County Bar association last May on the occasion of the 60th anniversary of admission
to the Iowa bar. He had studied law in the firm of Ellis and McCoy, of which his father was a member, during the
years of 1886 to 1888 and was admitted to the bar May 8, 1888. He practiced law in Denver, Colo., for about
four years before returning to Clinton and becoming a partner with his father in the law firm of Ellis and Ellis. He
subsequently was affiliated with the firms of Barker, Wllis and McCoy and of Ellis and McCoy and maintained a
private practice in more recent years. In 1898 he was named city attorney and served two years in this office. He
was a past president of the county bar association and a member of the Iowa State Bar association. Despite his
heavy professional duties, Mr. Ellis always found time to take an active part in civic affairs. During World War I
he was one of the leaders of the Liberty Bond dirves. He helped organize the Clitnon Community Federation and
at one time served as president of this group. For three terms he also headed the Clinton Commercial club,
predecessor of the Clinton Chamber of Commerce. Mr. Ellis was intensely interested in sports. When a student
at the University of Minnesota he participated in both baseball and football. He is credited with having the first
set of gold clubs in Clinton county. Throughout the years he had been active inthe affairs of the Clinton Country
club. Mr. Ellis also was a charter member of the Treadway Rod and Gun club and the Sagamon Shooting club
near Beardstown, Ill. In late years his primary civic interest was Jane Lamb Memorial hospital, in which he was a
trustee and the vice-president. Mr. Ellis had been a prominent figure in Masonry. He held the honorary Thirty-
Third degree of Scottish Rite, masonry; was a member of Emulation lodge 255, A.F. and A.M.; DeMolay
consistory and coordiante bodies; Royal and Select Masters of Iowa, York Rite; Royal Arch Masons of Iowa;
Hold Cross Commandery No. 10 K.T.; Kaaba Temple, Shrine, Davenport. Mr. Ellis was a life member of Moose
lodge and a charter member of Clinton lodge 199; B.P.O. Elks, and the Clinton Rotary club. He was a member of
St. John's Episcopal church. Mr. Ellis's memory of early days in Clinton had not been dulled by the passage of
years. He always had a wealth of information at his finger tips regarding major events of by-gone years, and was
always willing and anxious to use that information in guiding younger people in the community activities and
personal affairs. Mr. Ellis was born May 4, 1865 in Clinton, the son of Lyman A. and Mary Buckley Ellis. He
was graduated from Clinton high school and also attended the University of Minnesota. On May 10, 1899 he was
married to Miss Celeste Ware who preceded him in death on March 24, 1926. On Dec. 31, 1927 he married
Hazel G. Arp, who survives. One daughter by his first marriage, Jane Ellis, died Feb. 20, 1919. In later years
when his former residence became the home of the June Van Meter post, American Legion, it was named in
honor of his daughter, hence Jane Ellis Memorial home. He was preceded in death by the following brothers and
sister, Daniel, George, Lyman, Charles and Mrs. Garrett E. Lamb. In compliance with an oft-expressed wish of
the deceased, friends desiring to express their sympathy are asked to send their floral offerings or equivalent in
money the local hospitals.
Wednesday February 16, 1949 p. 10 Funeral services for Frank W. Ellis, 83, dean of Clinton county attorneys,
were held today in the Scottish Rite temple with the Rev. R.T. Dickerson officiating. Rose Croix services were
conducted by Wisemaster F.C. Bowersox. Burial was iin Springdale cemetery. The body had lain in state in the
temple since mid-morning. Honorary pallbearers were E.J. Curtis, C.A. Armstrong, W.T. Oakes, W.H. Iten, H.H.
Hobart, I.J. Derflinger, Bruce Townsend, Victor Sorenson, F.H. Van Allen, C.L. Bell, Dr. C.D. Grant, C.Y.
Hancock, Dr. F. O. Kershner, David Ogden, E.H. Christy, Dr. J. R. Jowett and R.W. Armstrong. Active
pallbearers were Charles F. Curtis,Thomas Oakes, Louis Iten, Robert Bickelhaupt, George M. Curtis, John Van
Allen, Charles Bell and David Clizbe. Attending from out of the city were: Earl Ellis of Idaho Springs, Colo.,
Robert D. Ellis, Pueblo, Colo., and Mrs. Lyman Ellis, Chicago, Ill. Municipal and district courts and the law
offices of the city closed at noon today and members of the Clinton County Bar assiciation attended the funeral in
a group.

Children of Celeste "Nettie" Ware and Frank Walcott Ellis were as follows:
36 i Jane5 Ellis, born 10 May 1900 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 20 Feb 1919. Notes: US
Census 13 June 1900 SD 2 ED 9 Sheet 19 Second Ward 318 6th Avenue Dwelling 409
Family 435 Ellis, Jane b. May 1900 age 0/12 b. Iowa US Census 30 April 1910 Clinton Twp.
318 Sixth Avenue Dwelling 425 Family 445 Ellis, Jane age 9 b. Iowa Obituary: The Clinton
Herald Thursday February 20, 1919 p. 6 Miss Jane Ellis, only child of Mr. and Mrs. Frank
W. Ellis, passed away this afternoon at 1:35 o'clock after a comparatively brief illness with
spinal meningitis. Born in Clinton May 10, 1900, she had during her few years of life
become known to the people of the city because of her wonderfully sweet disposition and
charm of character. Acts of love, charity and kindness seemed an integral part of her nature,
and when the great war came her influence and her money were given to the work of the
American Red Cross society, and with these she gave herself, working zealously long hours
daily, whether in her home in Sixth avenue, or at the seaside in the long summer days. The
crowning act of her beneficence is one that has brought cheer to thousands of enlisted men,
who passing through Clinton, have received comforts and good cheer from the Red Cross
canteen service, its home in the cheery little house now placed near the Northwestern depot, a
--- as a child played happily without a thought of war or sorrow. The people of Clinton have
been enriched through the life of this sweet young girl and they will sorrow with the bereaved
parents.


24. Merrette4 Lamb (Lafayette3, Chancy2, Artemus1), born 4 Jun 1867 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 2 Dec 1946
in Hennepin, Minnesota. She married on 30 Apr 1894 Eugene Joseph Carpenter, born 1866 in Illinois, son of
J.E. Carpenter and Olivia (---).

Notes for Eugene Joseph Carpenter
1880 US Census
J. E. CARPENTER Self M M W 45 NY Manf. Sash. B. &MA MA
Olivia CARPENTER Wife F M W 40 MD Keeping House MD PA
Albert CARPENTER Son M W 18 IL Clerk At Factory--- ---
Samuel CARPENTER Son M W 17 IL At School --- ---
Eugene CARPENTER Son M W 14 IL At School --- ---
Maude CARPENTER Dau F S W 7 IA At School --- ---
Fred CARPENTER Son M S W 4 IA --- ---
Mary CAROLL Other F W 21 IRE Servant IRE

Children of Merrette Lamb and Eugene Joseph Carpenter were as follows:
+ 37 i Olivia5 Carpenter, born 21 Aug 1897 in Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota; died 13 Nov
1993 in Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota. She married Folwell Wells Coan.


25. Chancy Robert4 Lamb (Lafayette3, Chancy2, Artemus1), born 9 Nov 1868 in Iowa. He married on 30 Oct
1891 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa Florence Bingham, daughter of James A. Bingham.

Notes for Chancy Robert Lamb
LAMB Chancy Robert 10/30/1891 Married today to Florence Bingham, dau of James A. Bingham of Henry
W. Kin
LAMB Mary A. 09/01/1891 Death-Frederick, Dakota-07/28-39y
LAMB Mrs. Isabella 01/20/1888 Death-Fri.-Wife of Emory at daughter Mrs. Geo. Chalker-65y
LAMB Peter 10/09/1891 Death-Charlotte-10/02/72y
LAMB Robert 09/29/1891 Marriage to Florence Bingham
BINGHAM Florence 09 29/1891 Marriage to Robert Lamb of Clinton-Daughter of J. A. & Chancy-19/28
BINGHAM Florence E. 10/30/1891 Married to Chancy Robert Lamb

Children of Chancy Robert Lamb and Florence Bingham were as follows:
38 i Louise5 Lamb. She married (---) Brooks.


26. Grace4 Young (Emma E.3 Lamb, Chancy2, Artemus1), born 1873 in Iowa; died 11 Mar 1907; buried in
Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. She married Marvin B. Pool, born 21 Apr 1869 in Janesville, Rock, Wisconsin; died 15
Apr 1950 in California; buried 19 Apr 1950 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa.

Notes for Grace Young
Burial: Springdale Cemetery

Notes for Marvin B. Pool
Clinton Morning Age Tuesday October 11, 1898 p. 4 Mr. and Mrs. M B. Pool and Mrs. W.E. Young are
home from their extended trip in the east, reporting a most enjoyable time.

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Monday April 17, 1950 p. 12 Marvin B. Pool, former Clinton merchant, who
later became a director of the Chicago National bank and was a national director of the department of supplies in
Washington, D.C., died during the weekend in California of a heart attack. The body will be returned to Clinton
for burial in Springdale cemetery Wednesday. Mr. Pool was born in Janesville, Wis., Aug. 21, 1869. He started
in the retail merchandising business in Clinton in 1888 and in 1900 associated with Butler brothers, Chicago. He
retired from active business in 1940. He was a leader in the movement which culminated in the forming of the
Industiral club of Chicago. Out of this same movement the Chicago Morris plan was organized. It later became
known as the Personal Loan and Savings bank of which Mr. Pool was executive committee chairman and director.
At the time of his death he was director of the Chicago National bank. As a member of the American Red Cross
he served on the requirements committee of the War Industries board during World War I. He was a member of
the Chicago club, Commercial club, Onwentsia Society of Colonial Wars and governing member of the
Glenwood School for Boys. Surviving are his widow, a son Philip, and a daughter, Dorothy - the daughter of
Grace Young Pool of Clinton, who died in 1907.

Children of Grace Young and Marvin B. Pool were as follows:
39 i Dorothy Grace5 Pool, born 1895; died 31 Jan 1964 in Pasadena, Los Angeles, California;
buried Feb 1964 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa. Notes: The Clinton Herald Friday January 31,
1964 p. 15 Death of Emma Lamb Young Heir Brings Fortune to Clinton Parks System
Dorothy Pool Dies in Pasadena, Calif. A fortune of three quarters of a million dollars
reverted back to Clinton today with the death of Dorothy Pool, 69 year-old granddaughter and
direct heir of Emma Lamb Young, who died here in 1926. Miss Pool, who spent her long life
under guardianship as an incompetent, was the only direct heir of Mrs. Young. Under the
terms of Mrs. Young's will, the bulk of her estate was to be held in trust for her
granddaughter, and then would revert at her death to the Clinton Park system and to various
other local organizations. Miss Pool died early today in Las Encinas Sanitarium in Pasadena,
Calif., where she had been hospitalized for many years. The body will be brought to Clinton
for interment in the family lot in Springdale cemetery, with the Snell-Smith funeral home in
charge of arrangements. Word of Miss Pool's death was received today by the City National
Bank, which has held the Young estate in trust. Miss Pool was the daughter of Marvin and
Grace Young Pool. He mother was the only daughter of William E. and Emma E. Lamb
Young. Under the terms of Mrs. Young's will, Miss Pool has been receiving the income of a
$600,000 trust, now estimated at about $750,000. Bank officers said today that Miss Pool's
death terminates certain portions of the trust, and that the Clinton Park Board and various
charitable organizations of Clinton would receive the estate. Definite information was not
available today as to the beneficiaries and the amounts they would receive. However in the
most recent court action concerning the Young fortune (the Albert McCoy trust in 1955-58)
interested parties named included the YMCA, YWCA, Associate Benevolent Society, First
Presbyterian Church and Jane Lamb Memorial Hospital. All had been named for initial
bequests in Mrs. Young's will. Clinton Herald Saturday February 1, 1964 p. 5 Private
graveside services are tentatively scheduled for early next week for Dorothy Pool, 69 year old
prime heir of the Emma Lamb Young estate. Specific funeral data has not been completed.
The body is being returned here from Pasadena, Calif. for burial in the family lot in
Springdale cemetery. The death of Miss Pool Friday terminates certain portions of a huge
trust set up for her in the Emma Lamb Young will. The latter died in 1926. An estimated
three quarters of million dollars will revert back to the city under will stipulations to be spent
for "acquisition, maintenance and improvement of the public parks" of Clinton. Miss Pool
was a granddaughter of Mrs. Young and the only remaining direct heir. An annual report on
the Young estate is scheduled to be filed with the District Court by the end of March. The
procedures in handling the remainder of the estate will be outlines by the Court.

Generation 5

27. Artemus Lamb5 Gates (Emma Rena4 Lamb, Artemus3, Chancy2, Artemus1), born 3 Nov 1895 in Cedar
Rapids, Linn, Iowa; died 14 Jun 1976 in Long Island, New York. He married Alice T. Davison, born 6 Sep 1899;
died Jun 1983.

Notes for Artemus Lamb Gates
The Clinton Advertiser Monday December 20, 1915 p. 6 Artemus Gates, who "made" the Varsity team at
Yale last season, is home from New Haven to spend the Christmas holidays. The Clinton student enjoys quite a
distinction in his achievement of making the varsity team during his sophomore year, and in being awarded the
"Y." He played in the game against Princeton and Harvard as well as in the preliminary contests and came
through the season without serious injury. He was one of the lightest, as well as the youngest men on the
"varsity" eleven this year.

The History of Clinton 1976 The Almanac p. 536 Gates, Artemus Lamp, born on Nov. 3, 1895, in Cedar
Rapids, son of Marvin S. and Emma Rena Lamb Gates; educated Clinton schools until 1910, Hotchkiss School
until 1914, and Yale University (BA 1918, MA 1942); married Alice T. Davison; two adopted daughters; died
June 14, 1976, on Long Island, N.Y., after a lengthy illness. In 1919, after illustrious service in World War I (see
The History), Gates joined Liberty National Bank in New York. Several years later it merged with New York
Trust. In 1929 at the age of 33, he became one of the nation's youngest bank presidents. In 1941, President
Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Gates to the post of assistant secretary of the Navy for air. In July 1945,
President Truman named him under secretary of the Navy, in which post he served until December 1945. In
accepting Gate's resignation from the government service, President Truman wrote, "You have earned the right to
return to private pursuits...it was under your direction that the naval air arm played a major role...in the
Atlantic...and in driving to ultimate victory in the Pacific..." Upon his return to private life, Gates opened offices
at 110 E. 57th St., New York city, serving as consultant. He served as a director of Time, Inc., Union Pacific
Railroad Co., and as a trustee of the Mutual Life Insurance Co. He also served as a director of the Boeing Co.,
Middle South Utilities, Inc., Safeway Stores, Abercrombie & Fitch Co., and Servo Corp.

SS Death Index ARTEMUS GATES 03 Nov 1895 Jun 1976 11560 (Locust Valley, Nassau, NY)(none
specified) 130-09-8673 New York

Notes for Alice T. Davison
SS Death Index ALICE GATES 06 Sep 1899 Jun 1983 11560 (Locust Valley, Nassau, NY)(none specified)
053-38-3456 New York

Children of Artemus Lamb Gates and Alice T. Davison were as follows:
40 i Diane6 Gates adopted.
41 ii Cynthia6 Gates adopted.


30. Henrietta5 Gates (Emma Rena4 Lamb, Artemus3, Chancy2, Artemus1), born 1903 in Iowa. She married
Laurence A. Murphy.

Children of Henrietta Gates and Laurence A. Murphy were as follows:
42 i Garrett6 Murphy.
43 ii Shelia6 Murphy.


34. Albert R.5 McCoy (Clara Augusta4 Lamb, Artemus3, Chancy2, Artemus1), born 1902 in Iowa; died 1957. He
married on 19 Jun 1926 in Dixon, Illinois Dorothy Jane Noble, daughter of Henry T. Noble.

Notes for Albert R. McCoy
US Census 21 April 1910 Clinton Twp. Bluff Road Dwelling 72 Family 74 McCoy, Albert R. age 8 b. Iowa
MARRIAGE: The Clinton Herald Wednesday June 16, 1926 p. 6 Announcement was made today that Albert
McCoy, son of Mrs. R.B. McCoy of Clinton, will be married in Dixon, Ill., Saturday afternoon to Miss Dorothy
Jane Noble, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Noble of Dixon. The ceremony will take place at three o'clock at
the home of the parents of the bride, with the Rev. Prentiss Case officiating at the Presbyterian wedding service.
The affair will be a quiet one with only relatives and intimate friends of the bride and bridegroom present.
Following the ceremony, the young couple will leave for a honeymoon trip to Wisconsin by motor. They will
make their future home in Clinton.

Children of Albert R. McCoy and Dorothy Jane Noble were as follows:
44 i Jane6 McCoy. She married (---) Daschbach. Notes: The Clinton Herald Monday February
3, 1958 p. 11 Interested parties in the Emma Lamb Young estate were represented today at a
district court hearing before Judge Clay LeGrand concerning distribution of a $100,000 trust
fund. The trust fund was left by Mrs. Young to her nieces Clara M. McCoy, and at the latter's
death, went to her son, Albert M. McCoy, who died last year. Judge LeGrand presided
during the suit then brought by McCoy's daughter, Jane Daschbach of Grand Detour, Ill., and
ruled that she inherit the principal of the trust fund. Today's suit concerns the distribution of
the trust. The trustee, City National Bank, holds that Mrs. Daschbach is entitled to about
$96,000, representing the original trust, less the amounts awarded by the court to Albert M.
McCoy's estate after his death. Mrs. Daschbach claims she is entitled to the accumulated
trust, which amounts to about $130,000. Attorneys representing Robert Smith, an heir of
Mrs. Young, and the Clinton park board, which is residuary legate of the estate, also were
present. Judge LeGrand took the case under advisement after heavy arguments.


37. Olivia5 Carpenter (Merrette4 Lamb, Lafayette3, Chancy2, Artemus1), born 21 Aug 1897 in Minneapolis,
Hennepin, Minnesota; died 13 Nov 1993 in Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota. She married on 20 May 1922 in
Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota Folwell Wells Coan, born 13 Nov 1894 in Clinton, Clinton, Iowa; died 24
Apr 1946 in Medford, Jackson, Oregon, son of William Folwell Coan and Mary Alice Wells.

Notes for Folwell Wells Coan
US Census 6 & & June 1900 SD 2 ED 9 Sheet 9 Second Ward Clinton, Iowa 327 Fifth Avenue Dweling 176
Family 186 Coan, Folwell b. Nov 1894 age 5 b. Iowa At school

Obituary: The Clinton Herald Thursday April 25, 1946 p. 14 Folwell W. Coan, 51, son of the late William
Folwell Coan, Clinton banker and capitalist, died suddenly of a heart attack last night in Medford, Ore., Clinton
friends were advised today. Mr. Coan, whose home was in Minneapolis, Minn., was in the lumber business. He
was attending to business on the West coast at the time of his death. Mrs. Coan, the former Olivia Carpenter, of
Minneapolis, and a granddaughter of the late Lafayette Lamb of Clinton, had accompanied her husband to the
coast, but had returned home for Easter. Besides the widow, Mr. Coan is survived by two sisters, Mrs. H.J.
Rendall and Mrs. F.L. Smith, both of Morrison, Ill., and three children, Gene, Olivia and Patricia. Mr. Coan's
father was closely identified with banking interests here for many years and was cashier of the Clinton National
bank until his death. Mrs. Rendall said today that plans for her brother's funeral are not completed but tentatively
have been set for Tuesday in Minneapolis.

Children of Olivia Carpenter and Folwell Wells Coan were as follows:
45 i Eugene Carpenter6 Coan, born 11 Aug 1923 in Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota.
46 ii Olivia Lamb6 Coan, born 25 May 1925 in Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota.
47 iii Patricia Wells6 Coan, born Mar 1927 in Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota.