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John Henry Mills

LOCKE, MILLS

Posted By: Debra Anderson (email)
Date: 9/13/2004 at 23:59:18

Pg 611, HISTORY OF DALLAS COUNTY, IOWA 1879 , Union Historical Company, 1879
MILLS, J. H., farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. Redfield; born in Wayne county, Indiana, in 1847; came to this county in 1856; owns 80 acres of land, and has under his supervision 240 acres; has held office of school director; he enlisted in the 39th Iowa Infantry in the late war, and was afterward transferred to the 7th Iowa, and mustered out with that regiment; he married Miss S. A. Duck, September 15,1867; have three children: Roscoe R., Charlie C., Milton D
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Pg 719-721, A Memorial and Biographical Record of Iowa
Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1896
Pg 719-721, A Memorial and Biographical Record of Iowa
Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1896
John H. Mills is one of the most popular and highly esteemed residents of Dallas county, and has been prominent in political and journalistic affairs. He was born in Wayne county, Indiana, October 31, 1847. His father, Milton L. Mills, was a native of Tennessee, born near Knoxville, in June, 1814. In that year his parents removed to Economy, Indiana, where the grandfather, Moses Mills, engaged in the dry-goods business with a fair measure of success until his death in 1828. Milton then at once took his father's place in the store, looking after the interests of his widowed mother until 1832, when he was united in marriage with Miss Matilda Locke, who was at that time visiting her brother in Indiana. Her father, John Locke, was a prominent horse dealer of Tennessee and owned a large number of slaves. His wife bore the maiden name of Sarah Dolen and was a daughter of John Dolen, who came from Ireland to Tennessee when a child of five years. At the advanced age of ninety-five Mr. Locke lost his mind, and was taken to the home of his grandson, Mr. Mills, in East Linn, Iowa, where he died may 10, 1870 at the age of ninety-seven years. The father of our subject was a member of the Friends' Church, and died in Redfield, Iowa, in April, 1889. His wife passed away December 1, 1887, having been idenditied with the Methodist Episcopal Church for fifty-five years. The subject of this review attended the district schools of East Linn during his early childhood. His parents removed to Dallas county in May, 1856, locating on section 23, Linn township. There he remained until Christmas Day, 1864, when he ran away from home, walking to Des Moines, where he arrived in the evening. This unfilial act, however, was prompted by patriotism. His parents believed him too young to enter the service, but on that memorable Christmas night he joined Company H, Thirty-ninth Iowa Infantry, which was sent from Des Moines to New York city, and there boarded a steamer that sailed for Savannah, Georgia. He joined Sherman's army there January 10, 1865, and a week later the troops started in pursuit of General Johnston, whom they overtook in the Carolinas, forcing him to surrender at Raleigh. Mr. Mills then marched with his company to Washington, District of Columbia, where he was transferred to Company C, Seventh Iowa Infantry, for the term of his old regiment had expired. After participating in the grand review in Washington he went with the Seventh Iowa to Louisville, Kentucky, where, on the 12th of July 1865, he was honorably discharged. On the 1st of August, following, Mr. Mills once more arrived at his home, after an absence of about eight months, and entered actively upon the duties of farm life. He carried on agricultural pursuits until May, 1889, when he removed to Redfield, where he has since made his home. His father died about two weeks later, naming John as executor of the estate. When the business connected therewith was settled up, at the urgent request of many friends, he purchased the Redfield Star, a small sheet of 225 subscribers, and changed its name to Redfield Clipper. In less than eighteen months it was made the official paper of Dallas county, and had a very large patronage. He continued to edit and publish this until March 1, 1894, when he sold to C.G. Brown. His journalistic career was a very successful one, and his ability for this line of work was very evident. Mr. Mills has always taken quite an active part in political affairs from the time of attaining his majority. At the age of twenty-eight he ran for the nomination, on the Republican ticket, for the office of Sheriff of Dallas county, and lost the nomination by only seven votes. On the 1st of March, 1884, he was appointed to the railway mail service by Iowa's noted Senator, W.B. Allison, with headquarters at Weiser, Idaho. Subsequently he was transferred to the Chicago & Northwestern road, and ran from Cedar Rapids to Council Bluffs. Later on he was on the run from Des Moines to Fonda, and while thus employed Grover Cleveland entered the executive chair, and he was in consequence obliged to give up his position. When in Linn township he served as School Director for a period of twelve years; was also Constable and Town Assessor, and is at present a member of the School Board at Redfield. In everything pertaining to the upbuilding and welfare of the community he takes a deep interest. On the 15th of September, 1867, Mr. Mills was united in marriage with Miss S.A. [Sarah Ann] Duck, of Linn township, Dallas county, and to them have been born six sons, as follows: Roscoe R., Claude C., Milton L., George M., Paul V. and Clipper R., the last mentioned being named for the paper which his father formerly published. Mr. Mills and his wife own 250 acres of valuable land in this county, ninety acres of which is underlaid with as fine coal and stone as can be found in this section of the State. It is now being operated for these commodities, a railroad has been built to the place, and there is a large stone crusher which was in active operation during the summer of 1894. Mr. Mills is now engaged with his son, R.R. Mills, in stock-raising. His career is in many respects exemplary, and his is widely known as an upright, honorable man. In manner he is exceedingly pleasant and genial, with a kind and encouraging word for all, and is a whole-souled gentleman, whose circle of friends is limited only by the circle of his acquaintance.


 

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